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Author Topic: Master Corsetry Thread (Post A Review!)  (Read 65148 times)
Crescat Scientia
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« Reply #350 on: October 26, 2015, 08:45:35 pm »

Can I ask you guys a quick question about corsets? What types of corset would you recommend to someone who has asthma? (If any)
I had a look around on the web and asked a company who sells corsets for some advice. It was suggested to me that I stick to under-bust corsets (less pressure on my lungs, easier to get out of if i need to etc.). I wore one as part of a cosplay to comic con and my chest seemed fine all day. I was wondering whether there are any other women on here who have asthma and were corsets too and if there are do you find certain styles more comfortable than others? any advice would be helpful before I buy one for my steampunk costume.

I can't comment from personal experience (in tems of health issues), but I would say it would be prudent to take care. In the BBC programme 'Hidden Killers In The Victorian Home' the presenter had physiological measurements taken as she walked up an down stairs in a tight-laced corset, and it recorded her blood pressure, heart rate and breathing rate all shot up significantly.

I suppose it depends just what you want from the corset. If it is simply for appearance rather than body shaping (as some of us require; my poor ones have to be pretty robust...), what about a fashion corset? They aren't meant to be tight-laced; just a snug fit and so should not restrict breathing.

Yours,
Miranda.

The main thing is how you breathe in a corset. 

In tight-laced corsets you can't easily breathe by expanding your diaphragm.  The corset holds your stomach in too much.  You need to breathe by lifting your shoulders, which is less efficient (as anyone knows who plays a musical instrument or sings).

It is, of course, possible to wear a gently shaped corset not tightly laced and still look terrific.
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Moneaky
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« Reply #351 on: October 26, 2015, 11:35:34 pm »

Can I ask you guys a quick question about corsets? What types of corset would you recommend to someone who has asthma? (If any)
I had a look around on the web and asked a company who sells corsets for some advice. It was suggested to me that I stick to under-bust corsets (less pressure on my lungs, easier to get out of if i need to etc.). I wore one as part of a cosplay to comic con and my chest seemed fine all day. I was wondering whether there are any other women on here who have asthma and were corsets too and if there are do you find certain styles more comfortable than others? any advice would be helpful before I buy one for my steampunk costume.

I know Steampunk is all about the Victorian, but an  18 th century style might be more forgiving to the diaphragm. Unlike the 19th century "egg timer" shape the 18th century aimed for A shape more akin to an upside down cone, which means a straight side front seam giving space under the bust where the rib cage expands. Otherwise if I was making one for someone who struggled with their breathing I would consider some kind of discreet elastic side panels or even something as simple as elastic lacing. And always with a front busk fastening so you could release yourself in a hurry!


I can't comment from personal experience (in tems of health issues), but I would say it would be prudent to take care. In the BBC programme 'Hidden Killers In The Victorian Home' the presenter had physiological measurements taken as she walked up an down stairs in a tight-laced corset, and it recorded her blood pressure, heart rate and breathing rate all shot up significantly.

I suppose it depends just what you want from the corset. If it is simply for appearance rather than body shaping (as some of us require; my poor ones have to be pretty robust...), what about a fashion corset? They aren't meant to be tight-laced; just a snug fit and so should not restrict breathing.

Yours,
Miranda.

The main thing is how you breathe in a corset. 

In tight-laced corsets you can't easily breathe by expanding your diaphragm.  The corset holds your stomach in too much.  You need to breathe by lifting your shoulders, which is less efficient (as anyone knows who plays a musical instrument or sings).

It is, of course, possible to wear a gently shaped corset not tightly laced and still look terrific.
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Prof. Cecily
Snr. Officer
****
Spain Spain



« Reply #352 on: April 21, 2016, 12:11:42 pm »

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen.
I've bought a number of corsets over the last 18 months and have yet to assess them here.
Corset story, Orchard corset, Restyle, Rebel Madness and a Spanish independent corsetier have received my money with...mixed results.

I'll post up my reactions to these purchases as an exercise in clearing my own thoughts on the subject.

I remain yours,
Prof. Cecily

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Mme. Ratchet
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United States United States


« Reply #353 on: April 25, 2016, 10:06:00 am »

Following
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Stella Gaslight
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« Reply #354 on: June 13, 2016, 09:30:21 pm »

I just got a timeless trends corset in their new hourglass shape and It feels amazing. I went for the same size I have in their standard and that was a mistake it is a little big, especially with me losing a bit of weight, so I am going to exchange it for a smaller model.  It may just be my body shape but it fits like a dream.  It doesn't rub at my armpits and it is flexible in all the right places. I really want to get one to replace my green one now.


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« Reply #355 on: July 28, 2016, 08:15:49 pm »

Love this  posting! Thanks for posting!
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #356 on: July 28, 2016, 11:00:21 pm »

Dear ladies and gentlemen. As a novice to the world of corsetry, I have found it an educational experience.  I did get to learn about the value of steel boning early on,  and have successfully integrated a corset into a costume.  

But I just wanted to ask a question and make a quick comment. What is your preferred method for tightening/lacing a corset?  Tieing to the back has proven to be a bit challenging.

A couple of days ago, I had the idea of using a "drawstring lock" used for laundry bags and sleeping bags.  You insert the two loops of lacing (4 strings wide) through the eye of the lock,  sliding the lock at first while tightening, and that later frees your fingers while you adjust the lacing,  finally pulling individual strings one by one to do the final tightening. A bow is easy to tie on top of the lock. I don't know if I can,  but I think I'm going to patent a similar device  Cheesy

http://www.strapworks.com/mobile/product.aspx?ProductCode=PCLCSBARREL&gclid=CJW_q4CTl84CFRc9gQodZ-IN0A

Has anyone ever heard of a similar device used for corsetry?
« Last Edit: July 29, 2016, 12:18:12 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

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