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Author Topic: Master Corsetry Thread (Post A Review!)  (Read 65122 times)
Madam Aurantia
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« Reply #25 on: August 15, 2010, 05:27:36 am »

These are just awesome!
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Siddons, the Incompable
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« Reply #26 on: August 19, 2010, 07:33:07 pm »

A query for the more experienced corset-makers here. 

Does it matter if you insert the grommets before or after closing up the bottom edge of your corset? 
I've gotten to these last two stages, but I'm waiting for my trim to arrive from e-bay, so I was wondering if I can stick in the grommets, then close it all up; or if this will cause some hideous disaster to occur, and my fledgling corsets to spontaneously combust?

Many thanks (in anticipation)
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lady joanna
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« Reply #27 on: August 19, 2010, 07:50:42 pm »

Shouldn't be a problem so long as you leave enough allowance for the trim. I've done this myself in similar circumstances and it's also useful for doing a fitting before you put the boning channels on. Smiley
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Elisa Johnstone
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United States United States


Meleus flecti quam frangi.


« Reply #28 on: August 21, 2010, 01:58:29 am »

Reposting this from another thread by request.  It's a video about corsets, who wore them and how, and includes a variety of styles.  It's from Victoriana magazine, and lasts a little over 5 minutes.

http://www.victorianamagazine.com/archives/5841
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Elisa Johnstone
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Meleus flecti quam frangi.


« Reply #29 on: August 21, 2010, 03:54:55 am »

Anyone have a suggestion for a pattern?  I am quite short-waisted, and my bottom half is two to three sizes larger than my top half, so the patterns at the fabric store don't work.  I am horrible at adjusting fitted patterns.  I am looking for something underbust.  Help, please?
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Thistle
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« Reply #30 on: August 21, 2010, 06:37:58 am »

I have, from my younger days, one of those shop bought corsets, boned and fits beautifully but not very great to look at. It`s covered in a blue satin-y material, hooks and eyes front and lacing back. I was wondering if anyone can tell me if it would be ok to cover it in a nicer fabric (without pulling it to bits first otherwise I`d ruin it) please, and if so, does anyone have any tips? Smiley
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Lyca
Snr. Officer
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England England



« Reply #31 on: August 21, 2010, 02:18:13 pm »

Anyone have a suggestion for a pattern?  I am quite short-waisted, and my bottom half is two to three sizes larger than my top half, so the patterns at the fabric store don't work.  I am horrible at adjusting fitted patterns.  I am looking for something underbust.  Help, please?


I can't really suggest any patterns for you as I don't use them, but have you tried drafting your own? The give a much better fit, and it's a lot easier to make an underbust pattern than an overbust! There are a lot of "how to draft an underbust corset pattern" tutorials online- this one is very good; detailed and it's very easy to follow, you might try it if you're stuck:

http://katafalk.wordpress.com/2010/06/24/underbust-pattern-tutorial/

Also, with regards to patterns, here's all the posts from the LJ Corset Maker's community that are tagged "choosing a pattern". Lots of people reviewing certain specific patterns on there, you might find just the one you're looking for!

http://community.livejournal.com/corsetmakers/tag/advice|choosing%20pattern

I have, from my younger days, one of those shop bought corsets, boned and fits beautifully but not very great to look at. It`s covered in a blue satin-y material, hooks and eyes front and lacing back. I was wondering if anyone can tell me if it would be ok to cover it in a nicer fabric (without pulling it to bits first otherwise I`d ruin it) please, and if so, does anyone have any tips? Smiley


I can't really think of any east way to cover your corset - especially without taking it apart. You could perhaps dye it, or sew some ebellishments like lace or sequins on? That might be easier. Also, what is the front fastening? If it's a busk, it's a corset, but if it's hooks and eyes, it's more likely to be a boned bodice- check the boning too, lots of them use plastic. If you want it to look better, you could try replacing the boning with steel if it isn't already; just open the top of the casing, slide out the old boning and replace with steel (you can buy pre-cut lengths online), then sew up the end. If it laces up the back, make sure there are flat steel bones either side of the grommets;  if there aren't, you can sew a channel and insert boning yourself quite easily- the channels at the back are just straight lines.
Also, if it fits you perfectly, you have a ready made corset pattern right there! You could try taking it apart, then tracing the pieces to get the pattern. You could also look at the seams whilst you're taking it apart, to see how it's sewn. Good luck!
« Last Edit: August 21, 2010, 02:21:06 pm by Lyca » Logged
Thistle
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« Reply #32 on: August 21, 2010, 02:42:55 pm »

Thank you very much for responding, Lyca. It has hooks and eyes up the front so it will be a boned bodice then. Smiley I also think the boning is plastic...the garment didn`t cost me too much from Ebay  Wink but I do like the idea of embellishing it instead of trying to cover it altogether. I used to make my own bellydance costumes so know where I am with embellishments! Cheesy
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Lyca
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England England



« Reply #33 on: August 21, 2010, 03:12:51 pm »

Thank you very much for responding, Lyca. It has hooks and eyes up the front so it will be a boned bodice then. Smiley I also think the boning is plastic...the garment didn`t cost me too much from Ebay  Wink but I do like the idea of embellishing it instead of trying to cover it altogether. I used to make my own bellydance costumes so know where I am with embellishments! Cheesy

You're welcome thistle! I think that it would look lovely if you add a bit of lace to it in places, like in this photo:
http://pics.livejournal.com/gleamnight/pic/000f8eta
Or perhaps along the top of the bust, like here:
http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v74/sapphorama/Edwardian%20Worth%20gown/Edwardian%20corset%202/
(There are a few photos of the corset during construction in that album, so it might help you get more of an idea about how and where to add the lace) You could also use beaded fringe instead of lace, that might be nice.
This one with sequins on the front is fabulous too, you could recreate this quite easily:
http://www.veldalauder.co.uk/corsets/popup/burlesque4.jpg
and
http://www.veldalauder.co.uk/assets/graphics/jewel-girl.gif

At the moment it might just be an off-the-rack bodice from ebay, but with a bit of extra effort, you can make it comething unique and amazing!
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Angelica Needle
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« Reply #34 on: August 21, 2010, 04:54:15 pm »

I spent some time with Sharon of Harlots & Angels the other day, and cannot thank her enough for her advice. I've just ordered a second corset from her Wink

I have, from my younger days, one of those shop bought corsets, boned and fits beautifully but not very great to look at. It`s covered in a blue satin-y material, hooks and eyes front and lacing back. I was wondering if anyone can tell me if it would be ok to cover it in a nicer fabric (without pulling it to bits first otherwise I`d ruin it) please, and if so, does anyone have any tips? Smiley

I hope she won't mind, but Sharon mentioned an idea about fitting poppers to the front of a corset so you could add a front panel, and change them as you like. Perhaps you could do something like that to yours?
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AlegrahEredschtadt
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States



« Reply #35 on: August 22, 2010, 12:31:35 am »

Ohh, I shall ask a question. Rose, thank you for jogging my mind. I've a not-so-wonderful quality corset that's become a bit of a disappointment, but I need to be able to lace it without the seams splitting any further. I've basting stitched them so they wouldn't split when I had to wear it for a few hours. Any ideas of a way I can re-enforce them until I buy a new one? I figure my next will be tight-lacing quality so it lasts.

Still awaiting an answer. Tongue
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Lyca
Snr. Officer
****
England England



« Reply #36 on: August 22, 2010, 04:56:09 am »

Ohh, I shall ask a question. Rose, thank you for jogging my mind. I've a not-so-wonderful quality corset that's become a bit of a disappointment, but I need to be able to lace it without the seams splitting any further. I've basting stitched them so they wouldn't split when I had to wear it for a few hours. Any ideas of a way I can re-enforce them until I buy a new one? I figure my next will be tight-lacing quality so it lasts.


Still awaiting an answer. Tongue


Are you able to take the corset apart, and re-sew the parts that are under strain? It's probably ripping due to a combination of things. Firstly, cheaper corsets tend to use the standard, pressed open, topstitched seam- where all the pressure is put on a single line of stitching rather than on the actual fabric. The thread quality is often poor too. Secondly, if it's off the rack (ie. not custom drafted), it's likely not to fit properly - and put undue strain on different parts of the corset, rather than having the force of lacing transferred equally around the garment. I think your best bet in this case is to try to take apart the seams that are buckling, and re-sew them together with a stronger seam; ie, a flat felled seam, or lapped seam. There are detailed discussions and instructions about which seams are the strongest and best to use here:
http://community.livejournal.com/corsetmakers/tag/construction|seams
You might also think about making it a little bigger (adding centre back or centre front panels in contrasing fabric?) and not lacing so tightly, as there's only so much strain something not built to tightlace can take.
Another thing that might help keep it together for longer is adding a waist tape - this will take the pessure of the seams where the strain is greatest- use twill or grosgrain, and sew very firmly around the inside of the smallest part off the waistline.
If you aren't able to do these things, you can also try whipstitching VERY firmly with a good extra strong buttonhole thread over the top of the split seam, making horizontal stitches to catch the fabric either side of the stitch line. This will be very visible; you then cover the entire seam with a decorative bone casing (you could use bias binding, or a strip of ribbon) to both hide your stitching and strengthen your seam - like the black stripes in this example here: http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v495/doc__holliday/corset%20stuff/greycorset5.jpg .
I would then repeat this procedure over all the seams that are being put under pressure, if they're all sewn in the same way, to avoid further splitting in the future.
Hope this helps!
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Thistle
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« Reply #37 on: August 22, 2010, 07:08:33 am »

Lyca, thanks so much for those links...I`ve now got some amazing ideas to work from. Smiley
Thanks also, Angelica Needle, that is a brilliant idea and even has given me a notion of wondering if the popper idea would work for a bustle Cheesy I have a velvet skirt I want to make a bustle for, and am now wanting to try making a couple of interchangable ones, and fixing them on with strong poppers might work. (or might not, but I`d give it a go anyway)
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lady joanna
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« Reply #38 on: August 22, 2010, 05:25:38 pm »

i wrote a huge reply for elisa and thistle, then my internet crashed!

it was basically what lyca said.

with no disrespect to the lady at harlots and angels, i can't see how poppers would work as they wouldn't hold against the strain of a corset??? they would perhaps make a feature if you made a placket over the busk for them Smiley
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Elisa Johnstone
Gunner
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United States United States


Meleus flecti quam frangi.


« Reply #39 on: August 22, 2010, 06:29:45 pm »

I can't really suggest any patterns for you as I don't use them, but have you tried drafting your own? The give a much better fit, and it's a lot easier to make an underbust pattern than an overbust! There are a lot of "how to draft an underbust corset pattern" tutorials online- this one is very good; detailed and it's very easy to follow, you might try it if you're stuck:

http://katafalk.wordpress.com/2010/06/24/underbust-pattern-tutorial/


Thank you!  I read through the tutorial last night, and most of it made more sense than I expected.  But there were still a few spots that I wasn't sure about.  May I message you directly if I get stuck?

Also, what is this coutil fabric I keep seeing mentioned?  I'm wondering if it goes by a different name here in the States, or if our fabric shop just doesn't carry it.  What might be a good substitute?

Would French seams work instead of felded ones?  I can get my mom to teach me to feld if necessary, but I already know French.  I'm not planning to tightlace at this point, but may move that direction at some point.
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AlegrahEredschtadt
Zeppelin Captain
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United States United States



« Reply #40 on: August 22, 2010, 08:09:35 pm »

Ohh, I shall ask a question. Rose, thank you for jogging my mind. I've a not-so-wonderful quality corset that's become a bit of a disappointment, but I need to be able to lace it without the seams splitting any further. I've basting stitched them so they wouldn't split when I had to wear it for a few hours. Any ideas of a way I can re-enforce them until I buy a new one? I figure my next will be tight-lacing quality so it lasts.


Still awaiting an answer. Tongue


Are you able to take the corset apart, and re-sew the parts that are under strain? It's probably ripping due to a combination of things. Firstly, cheaper corsets tend to use the standard, pressed open, topstitched seam- where all the pressure is put on a single line of stitching rather than on the actual fabric. The thread quality is often poor too. Secondly, if it's off the rack (ie. not custom drafted), it's likely not to fit properly - and put undue strain on different parts of the corset, rather than having the force of lacing transferred equally around the garment. I think your best bet in this case is to try to take apart the seams that are buckling, and re-sew them together with a stronger seam; ie, a flat felled seam, or lapped seam. There are detailed discussions and instructions about which seams are the strongest and best to use here:
http://community.livejournal.com/corsetmakers/tag/construction|seams
You might also think about making it a little bigger (adding centre back or centre front panels in contrasing fabric?) and not lacing so tightly, as there's only so much strain something not built to tightlace can take.
Another thing that might help keep it together for longer is adding a waist tape - this will take the pessure of the seams where the strain is greatest- use twill or grosgrain, and sew very firmly around the inside of the smallest part off the waistline.
If you aren't able to do these things, you can also try whipstitching VERY firmly with a good extra strong buttonhole thread over the top of the split seam, making horizontal stitches to catch the fabric either side of the stitch line. This will be very visible; you then cover the entire seam with a decorative bone casing (you could use bias binding, or a strip of ribbon) to both hide your stitching and strengthen your seam - like the black stripes in this example here: http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v495/doc__holliday/corset%20stuff/greycorset5.jpg .
I would then repeat this procedure over all the seams that are being put under pressure, if they're all sewn in the same way, to avoid further splitting in the future.
Hope this helps!



That's very, very helpful! One thing I noticed as well is that the seam around the busk isn't very well done and the fabric's pulling away. I'm honestly appalled by the workmanship on my corset. I might take it up with a friend of mine that does amazing sewing to see if she can help me with it. Or simply loan me one when I need one until I have the funds to buy another. :/
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Eleanora
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« Reply #41 on: August 22, 2010, 10:10:41 pm »

Elisa- coutil is a tough, nonstretchy (woven) fabric used for the base of a corset. It's likely that a fabric store won't have it, unless the store does specialty items. You can order it on the internet, and for substitutes, something like canvas or twill might work.
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Flynn MacCallister
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« Reply #42 on: August 23, 2010, 06:41:47 am »

Elisa- coutil is a tough, nonstretchy (woven) fabric used for the base of a corset. It's likely that a fabric store won't have it, unless the store does specialty items. You can order it on the internet, and for substitutes, something like canvas or twill might work.

I've got this very vague memory that someone (Vienna, perhaps?) got away with using non-stretch denim.
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Angelica Needle
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« Reply #43 on: August 23, 2010, 08:47:42 am »


with no disrespect to the lady at harlots and angels, i can't see how poppers would work as they wouldn't hold against the strain of a corset??? they would perhaps make a feature if you made a placket over the busk for them Smiley
that's what I meant.  Sorry for not being clear Smiley
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Elisa Johnstone
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Meleus flecti quam frangi.


« Reply #44 on: August 24, 2010, 05:11:25 pm »

My favorite supplier of re-enacting fabrics has metal boning, but is asking if I want 1/4" straight, 1/4" spiral steel, or 1/2" straight.  I don't know how to answer.  Would I want spiral on the sides but straight in the front and back?

Also, she doesn't have coutil, but does have cotton "drill" for corsets.  Would that work?  About how much would I need of it?

Many thanks for your patience with my many questions!  I *will* conquer this project, even if it does scare me a bit...
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Madam Aurantia
Deck Hand
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United States United States


« Reply #45 on: August 24, 2010, 07:52:09 pm »

I'm very excited. I've been wanting to make corsets for money for some time, and am FINALLY working on my first commission! If the client allows, I'll post a pic of the piece when it's all finished.

I'm currently in the midwest, in an area with lots of Goth and Fetish elements in the underground. But there are no resources for the laced crowd. I think I may have a chance here!
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lady joanna
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« Reply #46 on: August 25, 2010, 02:47:03 pm »

coutil is a very strong cotton fabric which can be plain or patterned, used on it's own or as a lining for fashion fabrics.  You could substitute it for heavy canvas or bridal interlining. I have used all three with success.

As for seams, I'm not sure why you feel you would need to do french seams??? The majority of seams on a corset are covered by boning channels to reinforce them - therefore a basic flat fell with the seam allowance cut away is the least bulky.  Obviously this is just the method I use and I have not had a chance to read through your instructions  Smiley
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bittersweet
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« Reply #47 on: September 02, 2010, 04:43:57 pm »

I haven't made any corsets yet, but I do plan to make some in future. Currently I use coutil for reconstructing bras from undergarments into belly dance costumes. I found a coutil supplier in the US that doesn't cost a fortune. Most coutil I've seen online costs around $30(US) a yard, but I just bought 3 yards of coutil for $11.90(US) a yard from tutu.com. Tutu.com is a ballet supplier that makes professional tutus and they use coutil in the bodices. They also have some different bonings, fasteners, and the like.

Here is where the coutil is listed.

http://www.tutu.com/fab_lining.html

Boning is here.

http://www.tutu.com/notions.html
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Then recoiling say excuse me
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ForestB
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Lady of the copper frogs


« Reply #48 on: September 03, 2010, 03:08:38 am »

I second the tutu.com recommendation! Their prices (and shipping rates) are reasonable and their shipping was timely..I will order from them in the future..
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Siddons, the Incompable
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Acctress chanteuse racconteur & amiable companion


« Reply #49 on: September 04, 2010, 06:40:42 am »

Anyone know where I can quickly get some aglets in the UK?  
I have some from Vena Cava *somewhere* in my house, but dashed if I can find them.  
VCD have their upsides, but unfortunately, fast delivery isn't one of them, and I'm worried that if I order more from them, they won't get here in time.
Any suggestions welcome  Smiley

EDIT: Panic over .... the aspersions upon VCD made my aglets pop out of hiding  Grin
« Last Edit: September 04, 2010, 07:20:29 am by Siddons, the Incompable » Logged
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