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Author Topic: Must Have Tools  (Read 5049 times)
hardlec
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« on: July 24, 2010, 03:49:05 pm »

I would like to start a thread of tools recommended for people.  What works, what doesn't, and how to start a steampunk workshop.
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hardlec
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Solutions do not need Problems


« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2010, 04:01:14 pm »

Bench Vice:  this is bolted securely to a workbench and is very secure.  A bench vice an hold a project securely.  It is a good idea to have soft covers for the jaws, to avoid marring the work.
Anvil and Anvil stand.  My particular anvil stand is a piece of 4x4 that is "tall" enough to get my small anvil to about waist level.  The 4x4 itself touched the floor, and I have added "legs" for balance.  I can strike metal on my anvil and the force goes into the ground.  A small anvil can rest on a bench, but hitting anything on it will bounce everything on the bench all over
SET of ball peen hammers.  Never used for framing, the surfaces kept polished, the right weight hammer, and a hammer in good condition it essential to any metal working project.
Torch:  A source of heat.

Dremel Moto-tool.  Easily the most versatile thing I own.
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akumabito
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« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2010, 08:03:15 pm »

Hand-drill... I just found one at an online auction for 5 euros.. yay for 60 year old tech!
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JingleJoe
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« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2010, 11:03:29 pm »

It really all depends on what you want to make (If I had a gear for every time I'd said that I'd have several whole clocks by now)

No use to tell people they need an anvil if they want to do leatherwork or woodwork.


However for the sake of the thread lets say that people wish to make things from metal and wood, then I'd say an essential tool is a pair of pliers! Lots of different kinds; chunky ones, pointy ones, flat-surfaced ones.
Knives are very useful too.
One tool I use as much as any other is the simple bradawl

One can be made very simply from a sharpened nail and a handle.
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« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2010, 12:04:16 am »

A pencil and ruler. You need them no matter what you make! without them in my opinion your off to a bad start lol.

A decent set of drills(to go with said above mentioned drill) in 0.1mm increments having the right size hole makes a massive differance to fit and finish Wink
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tophatdan
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« Reply #5 on: July 25, 2010, 03:09:03 am »

a floor mount band saw
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
i dont know how any workshop could survive without one of these... i just bought my third unit, i have owned one for 10 years + and i will always keep one around... its a must have no matter what you are doing...
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Vagabond GentleMan
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« Reply #6 on: July 25, 2010, 03:36:20 am »

I LOVE this type of thread!  The question has popped up a couple of times.

And I have my own personal bias!  Woot!

Alright, there are three tools that are the absolute necessities for any human being doing anything.

First:  The cutting edge.  Whether that be sharp pocket knives, exacto knives, chisels, saws, hatchets, etc.

Second:  Fire.  Whether that be cigarette lighters, welders, blowtorches, a kiln, a hearth, a forge, etc.

Third:  Cordage.  Things to bind things to other things.  Cords, ropes, twine, thread, duct tape, etc.

These three tools, the oldest human tools, are the tools upon which ALL civilization is built.  Application of some combination of these three tools has built everything around you.
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« Reply #7 on: July 25, 2010, 03:41:12 am »

I LOVE this type of thread!  The question has popped up a couple of times.

And I have my own personal bias!  Woot!

Alright, there are three tools that are the absolute necessities for any human being doing anything.

First:  The cutting edge.  Whether that be sharp pocket knives, exacto knives, chisels, saws, hatchets, etc.

Second:  Fire.  Whether that be cigarette lighters, welders, blowtorches, a kiln, a hearth, a forge, etc.

Third:  Cordage.  Things to bind things to other things.  Cords, ropes, twine, thread, duct tape, etc.

These three tools, the oldest human tools, are the tools upon which ALL civilization is built.  Application of some combination of these three tools has built everything around you.

I have to add one thing to VG's list:

You NEED some sort of Force Application Device, FAD for short... a rock, chunk of wood, leather mallet, or a BAH (Big ass hammer)... something to put things in their place...

One of my father's best bits of advice: If it don't fit, force it. If it still don't fit, get a bigger hammer.
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Narsil
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« Reply #8 on: July 25, 2010, 11:43:22 am »

The hard part is where to start, which really depends what sort of stuff you want to make. For general metalwork I'd suggest the following as a pretty versatile tool kit.  

Marking and measuring

-Steel ruler 300mm
-tape measure
-scriber
-engineer's square
-centre punch and dot punch
-vernier callipers
-internal and external leg callipers and dividers

Stock removal

-A good quality set of engineer's files, I'd suggest 8" or 10" files in round, half round and flat in second cut smooth and bastard cuts.
-good quality needle files
-Piercing saw (jewellers saw)
-hacksaw frame and decent blades
-ball pein hammers, say 2lb and 1/2 lb, soft faced hammer (nylon, rawhide, copper etc) are also useful
-angle grinder with cutting grinding and flap disks
-assorted abrasives; wet&dry paper, emery cloth, small oilstones, diamond files
-power drill, a pillar drill is an extremely useful, albeit rather expensive tool if you're on a tight budget and should probably be your first major investment. Look for solid construction (preferably cast iron), a broad speed range and the ability to take Morse taper shanks. A cross slide vise is an extremely useful accessory.
-drill bits, for steel cobalt high speed steel twist drills are best, there are various different types available for wood and other materials

General

-workbench and vise
-toolbox
-sockets, wrenches, screwdrivers etc
-3-in-1 oil, WD40
-assorted clamps
-gas torch



« Last Edit: July 25, 2010, 11:47:51 am by Narsil » Logged







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Kathy_Davidson
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« Reply #9 on: September 20, 2010, 09:25:22 pm »

Perminant markers.

It seems really simple but people tend to forget them. As well as the obvious I've used then to black out raw leather edges, add definition/shading after heavey duty crafting is done. A neat outline can do wonders sometimes.
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architect
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« Reply #10 on: September 20, 2010, 10:03:29 pm »

a pedestal to mount tools or work pieces on. should have a plate on top about an 1/8th inch thick. plenty strong enough for just about anything steampunk and still light enough for one person to pick them up and haul them around.

http://boatingsavings.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/Swivl-Eze-Fixed-Pedestal.aspx?a=674097&kwtid=557334&pm2d=CSE-BSV-3-GOOGLE

two heights available.
you can find table bases that are built almost exactly like this but with a wider base plate. I tore one off of a table that had been wet and ruined the top as it was some sort of chip board. so if you keep your eyes open you should be able to get a number of them all for free or next to nothing.
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greensteam
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« Reply #11 on: September 20, 2010, 10:19:32 pm »

Depends on your means: if somewhat impoverished, buy any tools available from local £1 / $1 store, Charity/thrift shop jumble/yard sale. Whatever it is will come in useful at some point. The tools in the local £1 shops here are not too bad although the variety on offer is highly variable. Currently some cute wee shifters (adjustable spanners) and tiny pliers.

I would say my two top tools in terms of how much I use them would be my Glue gun and stanley knife

I have two tool boxes:
One for everyday and for taking to events: small cheap n nasty plastic box, I think meant for fishing kit. This has small hammer, spanner, stanley knife, hacksaw, punch, hand drill and bits, pliers and snips. the removable tray has paintbrushes, pencil, ruler, fixings, glue, paints and wee odds and ends that might be useful. 
The other go-nowhere box is a big old metal ammo chest for my electric tools, planes, saws, crowbar, brace, chisels, lump hammer etc etc.
Floating between the two are my set of screwdrivers and the gluegun.

 
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Wormster
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« Reply #12 on: September 20, 2010, 10:27:24 pm »

HMMMM,

most valuable tool in the toolbox: the Mk 1 EYEBALL, without it nothing will ever get made.

Also a decent set of marking out tools: Steel edge, squares, calipers, compasses, dividers, french curves, punches, oh the list is endless!
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greensteam
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« Reply #13 on: September 20, 2010, 10:28:51 pm »

HMMMM,

most valuable tool in the toolbox: the Mk 1 EYEBALL, without it nothing will ever get made.

Also a decent set of marking out tools: Steel edge, squares, calipers, compasses, dividers, french curves, punches, oh the list is endless!
Useful nae doot, but many craftspeople dont have functioning eyes and still manage to make things.
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Philbyy
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« Reply #14 on: October 11, 2010, 08:25:17 pm »

May I ask the same question, slightly rephrased?

I'd like to start doing some craftwork, although I'm new to steampunk AND crafting. What are the tools I'd need for simple repurpose makes, with mimimal or basic fabrication? I have no tools as of yet, I want to build up some sort of basic list. What I've guessed/ noted that I'd need so far:

-Cutting mat or moveable worksurface
-Craftknife or similar
-Gluegun and some alternative adhesive
-Masking tape, pencil/marker pens, ruler
-Materials

Is there anything I've missed? Also, any suggestions for basic projects? I currently have an idea for a steampunked change jar... niether ambitious or actually getting anywhere, but I'd rather be reasonably prepped than just sink money into a rushed project.

Thoughts?
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greensteam
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« Reply #15 on: October 11, 2010, 08:39:45 pm »

I would say that sounds a reasonable starting point Philbyy. You will quickly find you need ways to cut heavier stuff and to hold things while you cut them, so your santa list to loved ones for them to buy for you should include:
Table vice (folding workmate type bench if you have the space0
Large hacksaw
Sets of screwdrivers, large and miniature. for taking apart the junk folks have chucked out, so you can cannibalise the bits.
G-clamps and/or molegrip
metallic paints
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Philbyy
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« Reply #16 on: October 11, 2010, 10:21:21 pm »

Aha! I shall compile a formal list and go shopping on saturday!  Grin

I think some of the larger objects- Table vice and hacksaw particularly- my dad should have for his DIY gear, I should be able to borrow them for now. Same for the large screwdrivers, small ones I may have to buy myself. I should also get a FAD if I'm thinking of getting into things- for 'Pressured Prying' of course, no blunt smashing... A small hammer, maybe.

Thanks Greensteam! Smiley
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Kathy_Davidson
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« Reply #17 on: October 12, 2010, 08:36:23 am »

You are most welcome Sir. Let us know how your endever turns out and if you have anything to add to the list Smiley
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hardlec
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Solutions do not need Problems


« Reply #18 on: November 14, 2010, 03:44:58 pm »

In a time when some folks are uprooted and have to start over:  what do you need to start?
There are other scenarios, of course.  What are you trying to do? well that's important too.

Hot melt glue:  I do not like this as a glue, it is too easy to just pop the parts apart.  I find it makes a great "clamp"  After gluing with something else, I use hot glue to hold the parts together.  I can then pop the hot glue off later.
Hot melt glue can also be used to make small details, it can be painted fairly easily. 
Useful stuff, I just don't use it to glue anything.

If you had one torch, what would it be?  I'd keep my bernz-o-matic oxy-fuel, as it is the most versatile.  I can heat, braze and solder with it.
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Wolf410
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« Reply #19 on: December 10, 2010, 09:00:34 am »

If your like me and into restoration then i have to say that a bottle of Brasso tarnish remover is a must

Also i would say a good wood and hack saw for modification
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Kathy_Davidson
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« Reply #20 on: December 12, 2010, 09:21:16 pm »

Oh, an Bostick Glue. The purple one that you have to be over 18 to get cos it' full of nasty solvants. It works so well because it's so bad for you (on a personal note: try not to get any in your mouth, I did (don't ask) and it really burns). That stuff can stick just about anything. They do a leather glue as well (no, i don't work for a glue company Tongue). I go through tubes of the stuff on a regular basis and have been known to walk several miles in order to get more so I can finish my project.
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The-Geared-Gentlemen
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« Reply #21 on: December 20, 2010, 07:13:16 am »

As a Tech for my sonar system and a bit of a jack of all trades when it comes to boat building I highly recommend a good set of screw drivers in all kinds of sizes, goggles to keep your eyes safe and a first aid kit. I know the last two are not tools but trust me metal or wood chips in the eyes or under the skin suck and should be avoided. If not avoided then have the stuff on hand to deal with them quickly. Oh and a hammer and duck tape. Trust me I have fixed everything from leaks to electronics with those two things.
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Judicator
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« Reply #22 on: December 20, 2010, 02:33:16 pm »

It really all depends on what you want to make (If I had a gear for every time I'd said that I'd have several whole clocks by now)

No use to tell people they need an anvil if they want to do leatherwork or woodwork.


However for the sake of the thread lets say that people wish to make things from metal and wood, then I'd say an essential tool is a pair of pliers! Lots of different kinds; chunky ones, pointy ones, flat-surfaced ones.
Knives are very useful too.
One tool I use as much as any other is the simple bradawl

One can be made very simply from a sharpened nail and a handle.
Excuse my ignorance, but what are knives good for? And how do you make the bradawl?
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bicyclebuilder
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« Reply #23 on: December 20, 2010, 03:33:25 pm »

Like JingleJoe mentioned: It really all depends on what you want to make.
I like to work with wood, so for me it's woodworking tools. Saws, hammers, nails, woodglue, dremel, clambs.
I suggest you just start your project with whatever tools you think you need. And don't forget your personal safety. Wear goggles. They don't just look good, they protect your precious eyes to.
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« Reply #24 on: January 25, 2011, 02:57:05 am »

Before I had these I thought I got along just fine. Then I got a set and would never be without them again! They really should have a pouch on my belt. They are Felco C3 wire-cutters. They cleanly cut up to 1/8" music wire without any drama. I use stainless-steel TIG wire to fabricate loops and hangers for items and that wears into normal wire-cutter jaws. Not these, they also cut coat-hangers, nails, bicycle spokes, and any non-ferrous stock with aplomb. Snip! Felcos are expensive new but do show up on eBay cheap. Indeed, there is one up currently for $10, Buy-It-Now.

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