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Author Topic: Acrylic leather dye vs. Traditional dyes  (Read 9968 times)
theviewfinderlife
Gunner
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United States United States


« on: July 11, 2010, 04:06:57 am »

Which is better?  I'm slowly planning several projects, but when the topic of goggles came to minnd I started looking into leather dyes for the colors I started thinking about.  I was presented with two options and no idea which is the better way to go.  I wasn't sure if it varied based upon color of dye, original treatment of the leather, etc. 

So, I come to you ladies and gents in order to find out from fellow makers, what advice I may draw from your experiences.

I'm new btw, so I've been pretty quiet thus far and read many threads on various projects to get me in the mindset for a series I'm constructing plot lines for as I work the initial novel.

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theviewfinderlife
Gunner
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United States United States


« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2010, 04:46:37 am »

Sorry, but could a moderator please move this to the general tactile board?  I mistakenly put it in the how to forum. 

Thanks in advance, I'll try not to let it happen again.
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Dorian Ambrose
Guest
« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2010, 10:46:52 am »

Acrylic leather dye is basically just paint. It sits on top of the leather and doesn't really dye it.
If you wan't a result like this:
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
, Acrylics are the way to go. Or if you want "extreme" colours like bright yellow/pink/white etc.

If you want something that still looks like leather, go with the traditional dyes. Remember to finish the leather with grease, wax, oil ect. if using the traditional dyes. The surface of the leather is still "open" and will otherwise dry out.
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theviewfinderlife
Gunner
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United States United States


« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2010, 03:08:45 pm »

thank you so much for your quick response and information.  I'll have to do more research on leather.
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Narsil
Immortal
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



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« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2010, 07:41:20 pm »


The two main options are oil based and spirit based dyes. Generally the oil based ones tend to give a more even and denser colour and the spirit based ones tend to be a bit more subtle.

There are also a few worthwhile water based stains like VanDyke crystals and iron soaked in vinegar which are very good for distressed looking finishes but can be a bit unpredictable.

I'd always suggest that you experiment with dying on scraps before you try out a new finish on a finished article and bear in mind that recycled leather with probably need treating with a deglazer to remove all traces of wax etc.
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A man of eighty has outlived probably three new schools of painting, two of architecture and poetry and a hundred in dress.
Lord Byron
JingleJoe
Zeppelin Overlord
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The Green Dungeon Alchemist


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« Reply #5 on: July 12, 2010, 08:11:30 pm »

Sorry, but could a moderator please move this to the general tactile board?  I mistakenly put it in the how to forum. 

Thanks in advance, I'll try not to let it happen again.
No this is the perfect kind of post for the how to section, I have told the mods on several occasions to add to the description something like "Questions regarding making things answered here too"  But they have not yet, so don't worry about it, this is just the kind of post for the how to section Smiley

You may be asking yourself "What does this lowly regular member know of forum topics?" But I was once a moderator myself, I started this very section of our forums Smiley
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Green Dungeon Alchemist Laboratories
Providing weird sound contraptions and time machines since 2064.
theviewfinderlife
Gunner
**
United States United States


« Reply #6 on: July 13, 2010, 06:13:02 am »

having been a mod for other forums, i know the feeling.  it just felt like it sorta belonged and also didn't.

as for lowly regular member, you're talking to a deckhand =p
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Hardwick Steam Impl. Co.
Gunner
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United States United States


You can find me in the lab...


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« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2010, 11:15:54 pm »

I've used oil and solvent based leather dyes for a long time. My experience is that the oil dyes will give more even, deep penetrating, rich color. Alcohol based dyes yield brighter, but less even color. They both have their uses. Both can be applied by daubber, brush, woolskin, and airbrush for different effects. Keep in mind that the starting leather color will have a tremendous impact on the resultant finished color.

My cardinal rule: Multiple applications while still wet for deeper penetration and more even color. Multiple applications while allowing for complete drying in between will result in greater color saturation.
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Dr. Emiel Kozlowski, at your service.
Zwack
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States

And introducing the wonderful Irish (Mrs Z).


« Reply #8 on: August 08, 2010, 05:53:11 pm »

I have been absent myself for a while... Life is hectic in a bad way right now...

Anyway, There are large numbers and styles of Leather finishes available depending on just what you are trying to achieve and where you have available to you to purchase the finish. 

As previously mentioned Acrylic is a paint, and can crack and peel just like a paint under the wrong circumstances. 

The original leather will make a difference, as will what you are planning on doing with it...

The more information that we have the easier it is for us to point you in the right direction.

If you want simple... You can purchase pre-distressed, tanned, dyed leather that may be all you need.

Z.
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"At least those oddballs are interesting" - My Wife.
I'm British but living in America.  This might explain my spelling.
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