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Author Topic: Leather pattern for goggle backing?  (Read 6182 times)
JonnyPhoenyx
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« on: July 02, 2010, 09:19:04 pm »

hello all.
I'm making a pair of DIY steampunk goggles and came upon an issue I didn't really think about:
how can I make the leather backing of goggles that support them around the eyes? (I have no earthly idea what they're called)

Here's a pic of what I'm talking about:


the leather piece behind the frames. I have a rough idea of how to do it, but I'd rather be more sure of what I'm doing before blowing through all my leather reserves with "tests".
Any ideas or links to patterns out there?
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arcwelder
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« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2010, 09:50:31 pm »

They're called cups.

Cheap cloth is great for testing patterns. You should probably do this at least once even if a pattern turns up.
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Mr. Boltneck
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« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2010, 11:45:29 pm »

I usually use a strip of paper or thin card, cut to have the same length as the circumference you require, to mock this up; this then becomes a pattern. This also works for metal cups as well. The procedure I tend to follow is to assume that the ends are going to be the skinnier bit closest to the nose, so mark the ends with a pencil for your minimum cup depth. For one thing, this means that my seam/solder join is as short as possible. The minimum that you use is sort of up to you—narrow to have the lens near your face, deeper to move it away. Then right around the middle of the strip, mark the maximum distance. This only has to be your current best guess, as you are working with paper. Then from the minimum-depth marks at the ends, draw a smooth curve to the maximum mark in the middle—this will look sort of like the classic Gaussian "bell curve" or like a gentle sinusoid running between two minima. Then cut out the shape, tape the ends together, and see if it's what you wanted. Check against your lens-holder, and your face, and in the mirror if needed. Trim as desired. Don't worry if it is not symmetrical: when you cut the actual cup material, just flip the pattern to make the cup for the other side.
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Reckless Engineer
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« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2010, 12:04:35 am »


A cut up toilet roll tube made my first ever pattern many moons ago.

Then trace to leather or brass ect.




After some work-


then abit more work-




Same principles apply for brass too
 Wink
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Miss Groves
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« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2010, 01:48:29 pm »

Mr.Reckless Engineer might i be so rude as to ask where you get your brass mounts and glass?
those goggles are so beautiful.
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JonnyPhoenyx
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« Reply #5 on: July 03, 2010, 04:32:52 pm »

"cups" duly noted. Thanks guys! Guess I had brain fart and didn't even think about using another material.

On roughly the same subject, I've seen several pairs of goggles (only pics) that have this "pasta strainer" like piece attached to the side of the cups.


I'm making a pair very similar to these. I found the washer part that houses the lens at a hardware store. Does anyone know what the gold part on the side of the cup is and would it be something I could make at home or buy at home depot?
( I thought of a sink stopper grate, but the only ones I could find were to thick to be bent to the curveture of my eye.)
« Last Edit: July 03, 2010, 05:02:34 pm by JonnyPhoenyx » Logged
H. MacHinery
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« Reply #6 on: July 03, 2010, 05:13:03 pm »

"cups" duly noted. Thanks guys! Guess I had brain fart and didn't even think about using another material.

On roughly the same subject, I've seen several pairs of goggles (only pics) that have this "pasta strainer" like piece attached to the side of the cups.


I'm making a pair very similar to these. I found the washer part that houses the lens at a hardware store. Does anyone know what the gold part on the side of the cup is and would it be something I could make at home or buy at home depot?
( I thought of a sink stopper grate, but the only ones I could find were to thick to be bent to the curveture of my eye.)



If you are up to bending brass, the DIY stores sell brass door kickplates that would do for several pairs of goggles.  If you want the ventilated look, trace out the pattern, drill holes where yo want them, and then bend around a pipe of the correct diameter.
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Reckless Engineer
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« Reply #7 on: July 03, 2010, 05:17:48 pm »

Mr.Reckless Engineer might i be so rude as to ask where you get your brass mounts and glass?
those goggles are so beautiful.

Nothing rude about your question at all Grin I machine my brass rings from solid brass bar, This allows me to make them perfect for the job and keep the weight down whilst looking good Wink The lenses are also made from scratch and are all cut by hand from sheet perspex. Everything is made from raw materials and made for the goggles so they weigh less than the plastic welding goggles often converted. The weight of some goggles has always been a problem in the past with of the off the shelf brass plumbing parts people use.

Thankyou for your kind words  Grin
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Miss Groves
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« Reply #8 on: July 03, 2010, 07:48:54 pm »

wow
having looked at the brass plumbing rings and other alternatives i can say that they weigh quite a bit, so turning is an obvious solution when you think about it. hard work though i imagine, i never worked at anything larger than jewellery so the largest i've worked with would be about an inch square cut from brass sheet.

i like the way that the screws are done as well, i think it gives character, and i honestly thought that the glass was glass and not perspex and of course that would keep the weight down as well.
I have to say that you put a lot of thought into those.
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Reckless Engineer
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« Reply #9 on: July 03, 2010, 08:20:23 pm »

Thankyou Roll Eyes The bolts are my fav too lol. I first used them as i ran out of epoxy which i used to use to attach the leather to the brass and ever since then ive used bolts instead so they look good and serve a purpose and remove all glue from my goggles Grin 

Its a bit of hard work turning the rings as its 2inch billet with most of it being drilled out then bored to size. I used to make them on my cnc lathe and could make 1 ring every 24 seconds now on my manual it takes me the best part of a day to make a pair hance the reason i will only be making around 20 more pairs as they are not cost effective to manual machine.
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JonnyPhoenyx
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« Reply #10 on: July 05, 2010, 01:26:05 am »

Thanks for all the incites guys! I think I'm going to take something called a "tea infuser" and cut/paint/bend it to what I need.
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Gryphon
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« Reply #11 on: July 05, 2010, 08:46:24 pm »

If the tea strainer idea doesn't work out (not saying it won't, it's a great idea, but just in case) call your local welding shop or metal supply outfit and see if they have any perforated sheet metal.  If you are Stateside, McMaster-Carr stocks it, but their minimum order quantity is rather more than needed for a pair of goggles.  I've used thier mild steel and stainless steel perf stock in the past to make faceplates for SCA rapier helmets.  Perf brass might be a little harder to locate.  If you look in the welding supplies section of most larger hardware outlets, they will usually have decoratively-patterned light-gauge perf aluminum in stock, as well as sheet brass in various thicknesses.  Be careful handling those edges, however, because sheet metal can be SHARP before it's deburred!

Welcome to BG, BTW....
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ebilwabbit
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« Reply #12 on: March 22, 2011, 07:35:04 pm »

I know this reply is very late, but I found the topic via google, so I bet someone else will in the future!

Here's a link to a very simple freeware CAD program that will draw a truncated cone (or cylinder) of any dimensions -- and you print out the pattern in actual size.  Just supply the base and top radius (diameter divided by pi 3.141), the length of the barrel, and then you can fiddle with the angle of the base (face touching part) and the top opening (lens touching part) so it wraps to the slope of your face and still points forward. 

This also works wonders for making the upright portion of sloped top hats since that too is a truncated cone.

http://shareapp.net/cone-layout_download/
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