The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
October 20, 2017, 10:52:54 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Brassgoggles.co.uk - The Lighter Side Of Steampunk, follow @brasstech for forum technical problems & updates.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: etch/cut all the way through  (Read 1259 times)
hardlec
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


Solutions do not need Problems


« on: June 29, 2010, 06:26:45 pm »

I have seen the contraption on photo-etch fail. 

I want to use the etching process to cut small parts, such as gears, for decoration.

I can use a program to draw the master, and then photo-copy the master.  I can use a thermal transfer to put a toner resist on the metal.  by using a 1/32 inch drill I can make register points on front and back and index the resist to make nearly identicle front and back.

Up to now I have used the same etching solution used for circut boards, found at radio shack.  It does not work well.

Will the electric etcher work to cut all the way through?  (I plan to use almost paper thin brass or copper.)
Logged

Whatever happens we have got
The Maxim gun and they have not;
Technology is no substitute for Valor
Both are true.
Narsil
Immortal
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom



WWW
« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2010, 06:34:24 pm »


Yes, this is a fairly well established method for making small parts for model making etc.

The main limitation is that the etch eats away more or less equally in all directions so it tends to undercut the mask in thicker materials and the back side will be less well defined than the front. However in very thin sheet this isn't a major problem, especially if you can get a good registration system working.
Logged







A man of eighty has outlived probably three new schools of painting, two of architecture and poetry and a hundred in dress.
Lord Byron
jringling
Time Traveler
****
United States United States


convicted Rogue and Vagabond…long story…


WWW
« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2010, 07:26:45 pm »

I use the electrolytic method for 2 sided etching often. I do not usually have to turn the plate I am etching, as any exposed surface etches well. You could also set up a dual anode tank, one for each side of the work piece. I have found that finer exposed lines etch quicker than wider lines, so try to keep your "cut" lines very thin. If the piece I am making has an intricate outline, I face the etched design away from the anode and face the "blank" side with only cut lines very close to the anode.

Follow the link in my signature to my deviant art site to see my results. Most of the ATCs with mixed metals are made this way. The swing-wig bee I made was also etched and cleaned with a file.

Last thing... I usually do not let the cut line etch all the way through, but stop it short. I then use smooth jawed pliers to work the metal back and forth until it breaks free.
Logged

arcwelder
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


Reverse the polarity!


« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2010, 12:57:36 am »

The main limitation is that the etch eats away more or less equally in all directions so it tends to undercut the mask in thicker materials and the back side will be less well defined than the front. However in very thin sheet this isn't a major problem, especially if you can get a good registration system working.

Haven't tried this, but it seems like a solution would be to pause the etch at intervals and coat the side areas which have been revealed. Not sure what with...
« Last Edit: July 01, 2010, 01:44:06 pm by arcwelder » Logged

Mad repairman for the ship of the damned.

hardlec
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


Solutions do not need Problems


« Reply #4 on: June 30, 2010, 03:47:19 pm »

The miniature in the "Star Blazers Fleet Battle Systems" game come with a "sheet" of photo-etched parts.  The sheet is 40mmx40mm and about .7mm thick.  The individual parts are cut out with wire cutters, a little filing or sanding, and glued to the models.  The result was clean, crisp antennea and such.

The scale I am looking at is "sheets" about business card sized, and about business card thick, again to add details to models and costumes and such.

I'm sure I could make an electric etcher, probably start with a 1/2 pint mason jar or something of similar size. 

Will "toner transfer" work?  Sharpie pen?  These are both the techniques I used in the past, but that was years ago.
Logged
jringling
Time Traveler
****
United States United States


convicted Rogue and Vagabond…long story…


WWW
« Reply #5 on: June 30, 2010, 05:05:58 pm »

I use the toner transfer. I have had no luck with a sharpie, not even for touch-up.
Logged
jringling
Time Traveler
****
United States United States


convicted Rogue and Vagabond…long story…


WWW
« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2010, 12:31:56 pm »

I have an "etch through" project in the next week or so. I will try to take good pictures of my process and post them here...
Logged
arcwelder
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


Reverse the polarity!


« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2010, 01:45:36 pm »

I use the toner transfer. I have had no luck with a sharpie, not even for touch-up.

Latex paint? You'd have to let it dry. Toner is heat-fixed IIRC, which ... well, theoretically something should be able to serve this function, it's just a matter of finding out what, and finding whether the utility is worth the trouble.
Logged
jringling
Time Traveler
****
United States United States


convicted Rogue and Vagabond…long story…


WWW
« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2010, 02:26:27 pm »

I use a paint pen. It is a pain to use as it cuts the green foil and toner, so you have to put it on heavy and make sure it dries completely, but it works. The sharpie slows the etch, but does not completely cover the metal. I'll use a sharpie if I want to add some faint details.
Logged
hardlec
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


Solutions do not need Problems


« Reply #9 on: July 02, 2010, 04:08:57 pm »

I am looking at getting a simple silk screen "kit." 
It is possible to photo-transfer images on to the silk screen. 

I am considering using a silk-screen to apply resist.  This is mainly due to the fact that I want to use the silk screen to apply maps to cloth, for another reason entirely.

Has anyone used this technique and what is the recommended resist? 

I am going to keep a look out for a laminator.  This seems a good tool to have, but I want to check the 50 or so thrift stores in my area first.

(No, they do not have a lot of old clocks with gears, sorry.)
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.047 seconds with 17 queries.