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Author Topic: Bestiarum vocabulum  (Read 19048 times)
bicyclebuilder
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« Reply #50 on: January 19, 2011, 11:10:10 am »

Darn, you think you've made up a fictive creature, turns out it's real!
Okay, okay, what if there were horse-like creatures with black and white stripes. Now, no way those creatures are alive anywhere on earth!
Or birds as big as a yeti, unable to fly because they have to small wings.
Or earthbound birds who appears to wear a tuxeto. Now that's to silly to be true... right?  Grin
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« Reply #51 on: January 19, 2011, 11:15:56 am »

Keep trying, keep trying.  You'll get one that hasn't been made yet.  MWA,HA,HA,HA,HA!  (I was watching the short of that very bad Marlon Brando remake of "The Island of Dr. Moreau."  But I'll leave you here, since It's about 4 AM here, and I have to catch some Z's  Grin
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« Reply #52 on: January 24, 2011, 11:08:48 am »

Another thread just reminded me that we have missed the mythical creature which was used as the symbol of Singapore.  The Merlion or Singa-Lautis the top half of a lion and the bottom half of a fish... The original name of Singapore was the "Lion City" (Kota Singa), and hence this was chosen as a symbol.  Any taxonomic names you can suggest for this creature?

From Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merlion

The Merlion at Mount Faber (Photograph released to the public domain by the author)
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bicyclebuilder
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« Reply #53 on: January 24, 2011, 11:59:36 am »

I saw:"is it true" last weekend on Discovery Channel. They wanted to unveil pictures and sightings of the skunk ape in the Everglades. At one point the interviewer was talking to two "experts". One claimed to have documented a skunk ape on video. This guy was so convinced, he agreed to take a polygraph test. It turned out he wasn't telling the truth.  Undecided
The other guy had a peice of hair, claiming it to be from the skunk ape. It was examened by a expert in determing animals. He said the hair was not from any known species from that area.  Huh
After watching the show, I was thinking it could be a real creature. The everglades are big enough to give shelter to an unknown species. If I would have to try and find a skunk ape, I would send a couple of dirigibles with heatseaking camera's. You know, those camera's the police uses to find villains.

For some reason, I like cryptozooligy, but I want it to be (sort of) explained. For instance, the Merlion. What if you was the first person who saw a seal or a sealion? The merlion would fit the discription, wouldn't it? (Don't want to rain on your parade, J. Wilhelm.)

Back to the expert on the Skunk ape that got caught: I understand you want to make a buck and you truely believe the Skunk ape is real. But why would you make a fake video and claim it to be real AND take a polygraphtest? If I would have to exploid an area that supposed to have a cryptid, I would leave the truth somewhere in the middle. Stick to stories by eye witnesses and undecided documentation. Fake-or-real artifacts. Keep it "magical".
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« Reply #54 on: January 24, 2011, 12:19:20 pm »

For some reason, I like cryptozooligy, but I want it to be (sort of) explained. For instance, the Merlion. What if you was the first person who saw a seal or a sealion? The merlion would fit the discription, wouldn't it? (Don't want to rain on your parade, J. Wilhelm.)

Ha, ha!  Don't worry I have an umbrella.  I don't really take it that seriously given that the creatures come together with stories about ray-guns  Wink

I saw:"is it true" last weekend on Discovery Channel. They wanted to unveil pictures and sightings of the skunk ape in the Everglades. At one point the interviewer was talking to two "experts"...

I saw the same program.  It took me very little time to know it was one of the poorest scams I have ever seen.  I didn't even finish watching the program it was that bad.  It's kind of sad that "educational" TV channels have turned to pseudo science more and more, specially after 2003 or so.  Honestly, I don't miss cable TV at all.  The Public Broadcasting Service stations (air broadcast) in the US still keep their programming with more or less good science and nature shows.  As to the why...well they had their two hours of fame...sort of like that moronic family who claimed their son was carried away by a model UFO balloon that his father had built.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2011, 12:20:51 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
bicyclebuilder
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« Reply #55 on: January 24, 2011, 12:33:30 pm »

For some reason, I like cryptozooligy, but I want it to be (sort of) explained. For instance, the Merlion. What if you was the first person who saw a seal or a sealion? The merlion would fit the discription, wouldn't it? (Don't want to rain on your parade, J. Wilhelm.)

Ha, ha!  Don't worry I have an umbrella.  I don't really take it that seriously given that the creatures come together with stories about ray-guns  Wink

I saw:"is it true" last weekend on Discovery Channel. They wanted to unveil pictures and sightings of the skunk ape in the Everglades. At one point the interviewer was talking to two "experts"...

I saw the same program.  It took me very little time to know it was one of the poorest scams I have ever seen.  I didn't even finish watching the program it was that bad.  It's kind of sad that "educational" TV channels have turned to pseudo science more and more, specially after 2003 or so.  Honestly, I don't miss cable TV at all.  The Public Broadcasting Service stations (air broadcast) in the US still keep their programming with more or less good science and nature shows.  As to the why...well they had their two hours of fame...sort of like that moronic family who claimed their son was carried away by a model UFO balloon that his father had built.

Ah, the boy who cried: "Wolf" "You guys said that, um, we did this for the show." Priceless, or should I say, pricy?
I have a theory about pseudo science and showing it more frequently on tv. It could be, because the public is being prepaired for the unknown. Aliens, unknown creatures and events. When pseudo science is accepted by the public, it can be introduced in real life. #Puts on tin foil hat and looks towards the sky#  Grin
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« Reply #56 on: January 24, 2011, 07:49:52 pm »

For some reason, I like cryptozooligy, but I want it to be (sort of) explained. For instance, the Merlion. What if you was the first person who saw a seal or a sealion? The merlion would fit the discription, wouldn't it? (Don't want to rain on your parade, J. Wilhelm.)

Ha, ha!  Don't worry I have an umbrella.  I don't really take it that seriously given that the creatures come together with stories about ray-guns  Wink

I saw:"is it true" last weekend on Discovery Channel. They wanted to unveil pictures and sightings of the skunk ape in the Everglades. At one point the interviewer was talking to two "experts"...

I saw the same program.  It took me very little time to know it was one of the poorest scams I have ever seen.  I didn't even finish watching the program it was that bad.  It's kind of sad that "educational" TV channels have turned to pseudo science more and more, specially after 2003 or so.  Honestly, I don't miss cable TV at all.  The Public Broadcasting Service stations (air broadcast) in the US still keep their programming with more or less good science and nature shows.  As to the why...well they had their two hours of fame...sort of like that moronic family who claimed their son was carried away by a model UFO balloon that his father had built.

Ah, the boy who cried: "Wolf" "You guys said that, um, we did this for the show." Priceless, or should I say, pricy?
I have a theory about pseudo science and showing it more frequently on tv. It could be, because the public is being prepaired for the unknown. Aliens, unknown creatures and events. When pseudo science is accepted by the public, it can be introduced in real life. #Puts on tin foil hat and looks towards the sky#  Grin

I think you are overlooking something. Has it occured to you that you and much of the rest of society have been played the fool. With all the religious fervor back in the olden days and burning folk at the stake and all, maybe things are not as they seem.

Facing religious zelots out to kill all those who oppose the is it any wonder we desided to go into hiding and 'discover' the sciences. We all know that the sciences have a place in the world and have long existed but the notion that they explain everything... preposterous.

Protons and neutrons and such, ha.

Think on it for a moment and you will realise that it just makes sense. Persecuted wizards and witches 'disappeared' and soon afterwards there are folk coming out with these new scientific proceedures and discoveries that make wonderouss things happen and change our world.

You are sitting in front of a shoe box made of an assortment of metals and resinous compounds, with a chart of letters in an unusual order which when touched can be used to scry across the world and send messages. It's magic and the makers of majic have placated societal mistrust and religious bias by naming it something else and giving it an image of lagitimacy.

Go on, 'split an atom', I dare you. Go get me a handfull of martian soil, or evolve a fish into a 'dinosaur'.  Grin
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« Reply #57 on: January 25, 2011, 01:44:14 am »

Quote
I think you are overlooking something. Has it occured to you that you and much of the rest of society have been played the fool. With all the religious fervor back in the olden days and burning folk at the stake and all, maybe things are not as they seem...

...Think on it for a moment and you will realise that it just makes sense. Persecuted wizards and witches 'disappeared' and soon afterwards there are folk coming out with these new scientific proceedures and discoveries that make wonderouss things happen and change our world.


Then cower in fear, you puny creatures.  For I am the great Wizard of Dunn!  With the Box of CATIA and the Oracle of FLUENT at my side I can dream up and then build a flying mechanical bird which will fly so fast you will not be able to hear it coming!   Grin

And as the great Wizard of Dunn I shall embark on my next project:  the resurrection of Ancient Greece's Great Chimera of Apulia

From Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Chimera_Apulia_Louvre_K362.jpg
The Chimera (Image released to the Public Domain by the author)
« Last Edit: January 25, 2011, 01:48:40 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
bicyclebuilder
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« Reply #58 on: January 25, 2011, 07:08:02 am »

When it comes to "the unknown" I feel something like Mulder and Scully. I try to believe that there is "something" there but on the other hand, I want proof.
I know the proof would be a huge impact to society, just like the discovering of the earth being a big ball. Back in the days of witch hunt and prosecuting infidels, change was a big nono. Nowadays we have so many religians and unbelievers living together, there is no "peer pressure". If you want to believe there is a big green pinguin watching over us from outer space, nobody will stop you.
It seems the one thing we all believe is science. There is air we breathe, the moon is a globe rotating around us and we are revolving around the sun. That's proven scientifically.
If you, without any doubt, can prove there are (lets say) yeti's living in the Himalayas, no one will not believe you. But there is a catch, if you proof it's existence, it might be hunted (to kill or take pictures).
I know not all has been scientifically explained yet, but give it time and it will be.

Back on topic: I think the Black Dog should be added. Wikipedia has a big article about these ghost dogs. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yeth_hound#Devon.27s_Yeth_Hound
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« Reply #59 on: January 25, 2011, 09:01:58 am »

Along the lines of  the X-files stories... Like saying that the inspiration behind Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles and H.P. Lovecraft's Hounds of Tindalos are inspired on legends of the Black Dog or Ghost Dog that may be true (although with a much simpler explanation)?  On another thread we did expound on the subject of the Chupacabra being or not being a mangy Coyote.  Grin

Toy Vault's "Hound of Tindalos" plush toy http://www.toyvault.com/cthulhu/oop.html
« Last Edit: January 25, 2011, 09:09:49 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #60 on: January 25, 2011, 08:19:54 pm »

I saw:"is it true" last weekend on Discovery Channel. They wanted to unveil pictures and sightings of the skunk ape in the Everglades. At one point the interviewer was talking to two "experts". One claimed to have documented a skunk ape on video. This guy was so convinced, he agreed to take a polygraph test. It turned out he wasn't telling the truth.  Undecided
The other guy had a peice of hair, claiming it to be from the skunk ape. It was examened by a expert in determing animals. He said the hair was not from any known species from that area.  Huh
After watching the show, I was thinking it could be a real creature. The everglades are big enough to give shelter to an unknown species. If I would have to try and find a skunk ape, I would send a couple of dirigibles with heatseaking camera's. You know, those camera's the police uses to find villains.

For some reason, I like cryptozooligy, but I want it to be (sort of) explained. For instance, the Merlion. What if you was the first person who saw a seal or a sealion? The merlion would fit the discription, wouldn't it? (Don't want to rain on your parade, J. Wilhelm.)

Back to the expert on the Skunk ape that got caught: I understand you want to make a buck and you truely believe the Skunk ape is real. But why would you make a fake video and claim it to be real AND take a polygraphtest? If I would have to exploid an area that supposed to have a cryptid, I would leave the truth somewhere in the middle. Stick to stories by eye witnesses and undecided documentation. Fake-or-real artifacts. Keep it "magical".
I didn't see the show you're talking about, but, considering the ecological mess that the Everglades has become thanks to escaped/released non-native animals, the "skunk ape" could very well be a real animal- possibly an orangutan or similar species. I doubt it'd be an unknown species. I lived in southern Florida; the Everglades really aren't that big, and have been fairly thoroughly explored. If there were enough "skunk apes" for a stable breeding population of large primates, someone would have found one by now. Also as far as I know, there aren't any primate species native to North America(I could be wrong on this though).
« Last Edit: January 25, 2011, 08:22:00 pm by Aleister Crow » Logged

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« Reply #61 on: January 29, 2011, 02:44:55 am »

The earth-dwellers Drillerius Maximus live up to 90 feet below the surface. They hatch from their eggs at surface level, where the earth-maggots wriggle to a comfortable 10 feet in the ground. After 10 years of maturation, they turn into brown earth drillerworms. These worms live for 40 years before burrowing to 90 feet, where they spend the rest of their lives. At 1000 years old, they lay eggs on the surface and die of the pressures.
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« Reply #62 on: August 21, 2011, 08:52:45 am »

There are some interesting creatures there, like the "ant-lion."

"The offspring of an ant and a lion, or the lion of ants" (!). Ha ha! Mechancally impossible?

The mediaeval observer my have been fooled by another creature.  The closest I know would be the "South African White Pigmy Lion" (Micropanthera Leo).  A diminutive cat a mere 12 inches in length, but actually a member of the Panthera genus (Felidae Family), with orange fur, the full grown adult resembles a kitten, but with with a full blond mane, and tail puff like the common Lion.

They hunt in prides of 50-100 members.  Their hunting method is unique, as they surprise and climb on their prey, charming it to death.  Then they consume the carcass in it's entirety.  Because of this feature of their behaviour, they are also known as "Piranha Lions.". I'll see if I can fetch a picture of a specimen....

Hello, ladies and gentlemen...  just necromancing this thread in the light that I found a photo of Admiral Wilhelm's -possibly daughter? ( ...As the character J. Wilhelm Dunn is an admiral by 1889...) holding a specimen of the White Pigmy Lion.

In any case, here's a photo of an adult female Micropanthera leo, on the lap of a character I'll refer to as Lady Priscilla Dunn:

(From the website of : "kelliebob" at milkshk.com)
« Last Edit: August 21, 2011, 08:56:08 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #63 on: August 21, 2011, 09:49:48 am »

dear me, do I see a bare leg? Are you showing dirty pictures again?  Grin
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« Reply #64 on: August 21, 2011, 11:10:59 am »

Oh! It's the uncontrollable youth I tell you! There's no reigning them in!
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« Reply #65 on: August 21, 2011, 05:09:19 pm »

I had something akin to the White pygmy lion for nearly nine years.  He was as described, minus the ruff & tail-tuft.  Got up to 18+ pounds.  His name was Wellington, & he was a marvelous creature.
« Last Edit: August 26, 2011, 10:52:58 pm by Will Howard » Logged

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« Reply #66 on: August 26, 2011, 04:15:37 pm »

"Professor Wormbog collected beasties."

An august tome (and my son's favorite book)

http://www.amazon.com/Professor-Wormbog-Search-Zipperump-Zoo/dp/157768687X#_
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« Reply #67 on: March 20, 2012, 06:51:04 am »

Here is another specimen for the Steampunk Bestiary:

The Vegetable Lamb of Tartary, Ovis hirsutum (A.K.A. "hirsute sheep of Tartary"), one of the invasive species originating from the release of Dr. Moreau's specimens into the wild.

EDIT:  Ladies and gentlemen, I have found more information on the Ovis hirsutum.  Apparently these creatures are born green and the wool turns from green to yellow and red before turning white after reaching maturity. The Sheep of Tartary are said to remain attached to the vine through most of their lifetime, so there is no need to shepherd the creatures.  The milk of this creature is also infused with color, and after maturity the flesh of the adult is comestible, and said to be as tender and succulent as that of young lamb (hence the name "lamb" which implies a young specimen).



I'd suggest the following taxonomy:

Kingdom:    Plantae
Phylum:            Chordata angiosperma
Class:            Mammalia eudicots
Order:            Malvales artiodactyla
Family:            Malvales bovidae
Genus:            Gossypium ovis
Species:       Ovis hirsutum

Actual source according to Wiki:

Quote
Lee, H. 1887. The Vegetable Lamb of Tartary: a Curious Fable of the Cotton Plant, to Which Is Added a Sketch of the History of Cotton and the Cotton Trade. S. Low, Marston, Searle & Rivington, London. (Redrawn from Johann Zahn's Specula Physico-Mathematico-Historica Notabilium ac Mirabilium Sciendorum, in Qua Mundi Mirabilis Oeconomia,...Norimbergae, 1696)


I would ask you fine ladies an gentlemen if you have ever heard of this species, and please do tell if you have ever seen one of these varietals...  I would be willing to organize an expedition in search for such a creature.  The potential economic benefits of such a plant (meat, milk-products and wool!) would be enormous in our economy!


I find myself at your service,
The Most Hon. J. Wilhelm
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« Last Edit: March 20, 2012, 08:44:32 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
bicyclebuilder
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« Reply #68 on: March 29, 2012, 10:06:15 am »

Can we add Gigantopithecus or bigfoot to the list? Or is this a real extinct specimen?
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« Reply #69 on: March 29, 2012, 01:01:22 pm »

Can we add Gigantopithecus or bigfoot to the list? Or is this a real extinct specimen?

Extinct? No.... Why I had tea with a yeti family just last week.. The lady of the cave made the tastiest little
cucumber sandwiches and served an impressive selection of fine cheeses... Fine brandy and cigars in the parlor after.... rather nice evening.
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« Reply #70 on: March 29, 2012, 06:31:59 pm »

Which Gigantopithecus?
G. megapodes, the Sasquatch of the North American PAcific rain forests?
G. yeti, of the highlands of Nepal and Tibet?
G. yowie, of south-eastern Australia?
G. odiferous, the "Skunk Ape" of the American swamplands?
G. otaku, of mother's basements everywhere?
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« Reply #71 on: March 29, 2012, 08:01:42 pm »

Here is another specimen for the Steampunk Bestiary:

The Vegetable Lamb of Tartary, Ovis hirsutum (A.K.A. "hirsute sheep of Tartary"), one of the invasive species originating from the release of Dr. Moreau's specimens into the wild.

Medieval Beastiaries called this "Barrometz, or the Plant Lamb" & the legend is believed to be based on descriptions of the cotton plant, of all things.
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« Reply #72 on: March 30, 2012, 01:04:22 am »

I'd like to recomend tracking down a copy of Skull Island: The World of Kong. Came out a few years ago to coincide with the movie and is chock full of artwork and descriptions of  all sorts of odd and dangerous creatures.

 https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=Skull+Island:+The+World+of+Kong&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.,cf.osb&biw=1920&bih=915&wrapid=tlif133306559397610&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&ei=afd0T_T1GKLJiQLJn6SnDg
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« Reply #73 on: March 30, 2012, 03:20:50 am »

Which Gigantopithecus?
G. megapodes, the Sasquatch of the North American PAcific rain forests?
G. yeti, of the highlands of Nepal and Tibet?
G. yowie, of south-eastern Australia?
G. odiferous, the "Skunk Ape" of the American swamplands?
G. otaku, of mother's basements everywhere?



All of the above, I think...
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« Reply #74 on: March 30, 2012, 07:00:22 am »

Which Gigantopithecus?
G. megapodes, the Sasquatch of the North American PAcific rain forests?
G. yeti, of the highlands of Nepal and Tibet?
G. yowie, of south-eastern Australia?
G. odiferous, the "Skunk Ape" of the American swamplands?
G. otaku, of mother's basements everywhere?



All of the above, I think...

Yep, that pretty much sums them all up.
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