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Author Topic: Bestiarum vocabulum  (Read 19267 times)
Rogue
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« Reply #25 on: July 19, 2010, 03:30:06 am »

I have a stone-cast fossil of a baby Draco Cheesy

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« Reply #26 on: July 19, 2010, 05:26:38 am »

A little angry, looks this D. maleficus...
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Dr Fidelius
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« Reply #27 on: July 19, 2010, 02:05:23 pm »

But Roadkill (marvelous name, by the way -- is it Dutch?), Dracos are Imperially Protected species, and the fines which are levied for molesting one are astronomical.  They breed very slowly, have suffered massive habitat loss, and the European species have never fully recovered from Medieval hunting practices.

If you are caught pestering any Draco species, the Daughters of Cadwaladr Society will be on you like verdigris on copper.
« Last Edit: July 20, 2010, 12:04:00 am by Dr Fidelius » Logged

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« Reply #28 on: August 04, 2010, 10:13:39 pm »

Aye, the Daughters have been at my doorstep one too many times, but I've developed a deterrent. They seem to be agitated by a strong magnetic field, I'm guessing because their scales have been shown to have minute amounts of metal. And don't worry- The dragons that I've studied have all either died of natural causes or been studied at a distance.

As for the name- It's derogatory among sailors for someone that rides in a steam-carriage rather than a dirigible.
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« Reply #29 on: August 04, 2010, 10:32:38 pm »

Yes, haven't you ever heard the phrase Aaaaargh!  You'll make no friends among the Roadkill ?
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Roadkill
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« Reply #30 on: August 04, 2010, 10:51:27 pm »

Yes, don't remind me. While you have your heads in the clouds, I'm mucking about in caves and jungles, finding things you all never would have dreamed be on the ground. For example, did you know the flying trees you all have spoken of have ancestors in the plains? They float about, dropping seedpods which pop into a fluffy white mass upon landing. they absorb carbon dioxide much like other plants, but store the oxygen they produce inside a green, tough-skinned balloon. Many believe these 'Flying tumbleweeds' volved into the huge floating forests which I have yet to have the pleasure of seeing.
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« Reply #31 on: August 06, 2010, 03:38:44 am »

OH! I must simply take you up to one of my treeballs sometime. Fall is a good time as the aircats are off their breeding cycle at that time and much easier to deal with. Also in the fall the dirigible slugs turn colors for their breeding cycles and you can see all kinds of slimy little blimps floating around in marvelous colors.
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« Reply #32 on: August 09, 2010, 12:03:27 am »

Honestly, I would love it. It'd be a nice change from these humid, toxic jungles I've been in for the past few months. The plants give off a natural ambient radiation, so I have to take this vile treacle every night, and I swear it makes me sicker than the radiation ever would.
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« Reply #33 on: August 09, 2010, 12:11:24 am »

Also in the fall the dirigible slugs turn colors for their breeding cycles and you can see all kinds of slimy little blimps floating around in marvelous colors.

 Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy
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Picaroon
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« Reply #34 on: August 19, 2010, 05:19:07 am »

Amber colored gas serpents, the species of succinum sol serpentis. Those coronal loops on the sun a dozen or so times bigger than the Earth are made even more sinister. Already unsettling is the idea of celestial structures of monstrous size and temperature, but to make them active participants in this game of life is truly disturbing. What’s more is that I’ve recently heard of aubadian astronomers observing through their deep onyx tinted lenses, gigantic, diamond-esque eyes peering hungrily towards Earth.
« Last Edit: August 19, 2010, 10:33:58 am by Picaroon » Logged

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« Reply #35 on: January 14, 2011, 07:49:36 am »

... Already unsettling is the idea of celestial structures of monstrous size and temperature, but to make them active participants in this game of life is truly disturbing. What’s more is that I’ve recently heard of aubadian astronomers observing through their deep onyx tinted lenses, gigantic, diamond-esque eyes peering hungrily towards Earth...

Do you mean an astronomical sized living creature? Oh wait!  Could this be the evidence you seek?

http://www.ibtimes.com/articles/100586/20110113/green-blob-hubble-nasa-sicence-earth-milky-way-galaxy-universe-stars-hanny-s-voorwerp-ic2947-space.htm

Is this green phosphorescent mass, known as Hanny's Voorwerp, evidence of the horrible deities described in the Necronomicon?  One can only imagine the sort of eldritch mysteries which lie in the vast dark domains of Azathoth, the blind-idiot ruler of the skyes.

EDIT: My apologies for bringing this old thread back to life.  The war god Nyarlathotep made an offer I couldn't refuse, you see, and as part of the contract I had to invoke my powers of necromancy, so this is what happens if I want to travel inter-dimensionally to other worlds

(For those of you left in the dark like this:  Huh  I gave reference to the Dreams in the Witch House by H.P. Lovecraft)  Grin
« Last Edit: January 14, 2011, 08:03:11 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
darkshines
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« Reply #36 on: January 14, 2011, 09:26:11 am »

Real dragons? Tongue

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« Reply #37 on: January 14, 2011, 03:56:18 pm »

The revival of this thread reminds me to tell you all about something I found a while back.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Horror_of_the_Heights

you can actually find the story in it's entirety online. An interesting read. It seems that Holmes creator beat us to the idea by a good bit of time.

The explanation of the science of why such things might exist proved facinating and helped inspire plot elements in one of my NaNoWriMo stories.

If I ever end up making a dragonology style book of creatures of steampunk these ideas will play a part.
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« Reply #38 on: January 16, 2011, 10:32:49 am »

The revival of this thread reminds me to tell you all about something I found a while back.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Horror_of_the_Heights

you can actually find the story in it's entirety online. An interesting read. It seems that Holmes creator beat us to the idea by a good bit of time.

The explanation of the science of why such things might exist proved facinating and helped inspire plot elements in one of my NaNoWriMo stories.

If I ever end up making a dragonology style book of creatures of steampunk these ideas will play a part.


Ha.  A stratospheric ecosystem.  That's interesting, that can be so Steampunk if adapted.  I just randomly picked the statosphere for my brief stories because I'm an aero engineer not for any other reason...seems I hit it on the nail  Grin


Real dragons? Tongue



A photo of two peculiar dragon-shaped objects taken from a plane flying over Tibet’s Himalayas piqued many users’ interest when displayed on a Chinese website. The photographer is an amateur...


That's an interesting picture.  The ice does look like reptilian figures.  These must be glacier "conveyour belts."  Ice Dragons?  Grin
« Last Edit: January 16, 2011, 10:42:11 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Dr Fidelius
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« Reply #39 on: January 17, 2011, 02:28:54 am »

Orms, or wyrms from Niflheim, land of the Ice Giants.

Dammit, now I have to work some real Norse mythology into Steampunk.
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« Reply #40 on: January 17, 2011, 04:35:13 am »

*cough* it's Cthulhu *cough*
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« Reply #41 on: January 17, 2011, 08:57:14 am »

Orms, or wyrms from Niflheim, land of the Ice Giants.

Dammit, now I have to work some real Norse mythology into Steampunk.

Much smaller, but, how about other species of Drakes or Wyverns, for example?
« Last Edit: January 17, 2011, 09:05:03 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Dr Fidelius
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« Reply #42 on: January 17, 2011, 01:23:04 pm »

Orms, or wyrms from Niflheim, land of the Ice Giants.

Dammit, now I have to work some real Norse mythology into Steampunk.

Much smaller, but, how about other species of Drakes or Wyverns, for example?

They are great, but those Tibetan dragons are clearly ground-huggers.  It's hard to get a scale (ha-ha) but they look to me as if they were frost serpents.
Now, if they were furred serpents they would be from Fafhrd's home town.
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« Reply #43 on: January 17, 2011, 01:55:21 pm »

Size matters. Breeding (as mentioned by Darwin or forced by humans) can bring wonderfull creatures.
Everyone knows Kraken are an evolutionairy breed of big octopusses with bigger octopusses who breed with bigger octo.... etc. Somewhere in the deep forests of dark Africa, there are pigmee-elephants. Fullgrown bulls grow up to about the size of a chihuahua. Because of their small appearance they are as fast as a hare. Although harmless, they are just as vicious as the bigger "normal" elephant. In the mind of the pigmee-elephant, they are the same size as a mamouth, making them fearless.
(need a latin name)

An extinct tribe of native americans, forcebreed big ragdoll cats untill the cats were twice the size of an average male lion. These ragdoll mountainlions soul perpose was to keep the native americans warm during the harsh winters of North America. Their layed back, non violent nature, made them great pets. The tribe was extinct, but the ragdoll mountainlions still roam the mountains of North America. (need a latin name)
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« Reply #44 on: January 17, 2011, 02:10:18 pm »

Size matters. Breeding (as mentioned by Darwin or forced by humans) can bring wonderfull creatures.
Everyone knows Kraken are an evolutionairy breed of big octopusses with bigger octopusses who breed with bigger octo.... etc. Somewhere in the deep forests of dark Africa, there are pigmee-elephants. Fullgrown bulls grow up to about the size of a chihuahua. Because of their small appearance they are as fast as a hare. Although harmless, they are just as vicious as the bigger "normal" elephant. In the mind of the pigmee-elephant, they are the same size as a mamouth, making them fearless.
(need a latin name)

Loxodonta minimus, common name Mimmoth.

An extinct tribe of native americans, forcebreed big ragdoll cats untill the cats were twice the size of an average male lion. These ragdoll mountainlions soul perpose was to keep the native americans warm during the harsh winters of North America. Their layed back, non violent nature, made them great pets. The tribe was extinct, but the ragdoll mountainlions still roam the mountains of North America. (need a latin name)

Felis magnivestis, also known as the Blanketcat
« Last Edit: January 17, 2011, 02:11:49 pm by Dr Fidelius » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #45 on: January 18, 2011, 05:50:02 am »

Size matters. Breeding (as mentioned by Darwin or forced by humans) can bring wonderfull creatures.
Everyone knows Kraken are an evolutionairy breed of big octopusses with bigger octopusses who breed with bigger octo.... etc. Somewhere in the deep forests of dark Africa, there are pigmee-elephants. Fullgrown bulls grow up to about the size of a chihuahua. Because of their small appearance they are as fast as a hare. Although harmless, they are just as vicious as the bigger "normal" elephant. In the mind of the pigmee-elephant, they are the same size as a mamouth, making them fearless.
(need a latin name)

Loxodonta minimus, common name Mimmoth.

Ha, ha, ha, ha!  Which naturally explains the existence of matching miniature predators, like my South African Pigmy Lion (a.k.a. "Piranha Lion"), the ubiquitous Micropanthera leo I wrote about in the first page!  Ha, ha!

An extinct tribe of native americans, forcebreed big ragdoll cats untill the cats were twice the size of an average male lion. These ragdoll mountainlions soul perpose was to keep the native americans warm during the harsh winters of North America. Their layed back, non violent nature, made them great pets. The tribe was extinct, but the ragdoll mountainlions still roam the mountains of North America. (need a latin name)

Felis magnivestis, also known as the Blanketcat

In the Americas would that creature come from the Mountain Lion a.k.a Cougar a.k.a. Puma (Puma concolor) line?
« Last Edit: January 18, 2011, 06:03:19 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
bicyclebuilder
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« Reply #46 on: January 18, 2011, 08:26:54 am »

When it comes to mythical creatures I'm kind of an atheïst. A more logical Darwinian explaination seems to be more convincing than just staying:"because I say so" and "it is written".
Jackalopes and unicorns are actually regular rabbits and horses with the papillomavirus. It grows hornlike tumors around the head area. (look it up, it's real)
Two headed creatures get born every day. Same goes for one eyed creatures and albinos. Their survival chance is slim, but they are scientifically explainable.
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« Reply #47 on: January 18, 2011, 11:30:20 am »

All right then,  not a mythical creature but one from science:

I just read that Japanese researchers want to clone a mammoth specimen in two years from the DNA of a preserved carcass found in Russia.  They plant to implant the mammoth cell nuclei into elephant cells, and naturally use an elephant as surrogate: http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20110117/wl_asia_afp/japansciencemammoth_20110117104445

Loxodonta minimus, common name Mimmoth.

EDIT: Also, please note that there was a real Pygmy Mammoth!  I just found out.  It's called Mammuthus exilis.   Grin Ha, ha!  Although I really don't know how "small" it was.  The "Mimmoth" may need a different taxonomy (Note Loxodonta or Elephas is used for Elephants, Mammoths belong to a different genus, Mammuthus).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mammoth
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elephant
« Last Edit: January 18, 2011, 11:50:10 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #48 on: January 19, 2011, 07:57:35 am »

Loxodonta minimus, common name Mimmoth.

EDIT: Also, please note that there was a real Pygmy Mammoth!  I just found out.  It's called Mammuthus exilis.   Grin Ha, ha!  Although I really don't know how "small" it was.  The "Mimmoth" may need a different taxonomy (Note Loxodonta or Elephas is used for Elephants, Mammoths belong to a different genus, Mammuthus).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mammoth
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elephant


The Common Mimmoth (Micromammuthus vulgaris) is not related to either the Pygmy Mammoth (Mammuthus exilis) or the Sardinian Dwarf Mammoth (Mammuthus lamarmoræ). Recent investigation suggests that the Common Mimmoth is not a natural creature at all, but rather may be an escaped experiment in genetic engineering. Although it appears to have considerable DNA in common with Mammuthus primigenius (the Woolly Mammoth), it also shares markers with one or more unidentified non-Proboscid species, so it is extremely unlikely that Mammoths and Mimmoths could ever interbreed, even without the obvious existential and mechanical obstacles.

EDIT: I should probably point out that, so far as I know, the original concept of the Mimmoth belongs to Kaja and Phil Foglio, who seem like really cool people who likely won't mind if we take the idea and run with it so long as we give credit where it's due.
« Last Edit: January 30, 2011, 07:08:33 am by von Corax » Logged

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« Reply #49 on: January 19, 2011, 10:50:50 am »

Quote
... so it is extremely unlikely that Mammoths and Mimmoths could ever interbreed, even without the obvious existential and mechanical obstacles.

Ha, ha, ha, ha!  ROFL!  Grin That reminds me of a very dirty Mexican joke involving an elephant and a monkey, which I will not repeat here!

Quote
The Common Mimmoth (Micromammuthus vulgaris) is not related to either the Pygmy Mammoth (Mammuthus exilis) or the Sardinian Dwarf Mammoth (Mammuthus lamarmoræ)

So I take it neither the processes of allopatric speciation, or insular dwarfism  were involved in the emergence of  Micromammuthus vulgaris Grin  Escaped experiment?  I wonder who is responsible then...  not that wretched Dr. Moreau!
« Last Edit: January 19, 2011, 11:07:35 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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