The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
December 18, 2017, 11:35:38 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Brassgoggles.co.uk - The Lighter Side Of Steampunk, follow @brasstech for forum technical problems & updates.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Removing solder  (Read 1899 times)
Kevin C Cooper Esq
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Asymetry is the bane of my life


WWW
« on: May 19, 2010, 08:24:25 pm »

Is there a way to eradicate all traces of solder from the exterior of a metal tube, without resorting to abrasive methods. I've removed as much as possible by heating and wiping.
Logged

Silent Theatre
Officer
***
United Kingdom United Kingdom



WWW
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2010, 08:41:48 pm »

Sorry, you beat me to it.I was going to suggest heating it and some kind of abrasion.I use a nail file to de-sharpen pointy bits.
Sorry to not be of any help.
Logged

Narsil
Immortal
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom



WWW
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2010, 08:44:57 pm »


What sort of solder is it and what material is the tube ?

Sometimes solder can eat into the surface of the base metal which makes it all but impossible to remove completely.
Logged







A man of eighty has outlived probably three new schools of painting, two of architecture and poetry and a hundred in dress.
Lord Byron
sidecar_jon
Snr. Officer
****


« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2010, 09:04:09 pm »

I agree with Narsil, part of solders properties are that it gets in intimate contact with the base metal and abrasion is the only way to get it off and remove part of the surface. Chances are any sort of chemical attack will dissolve the base metal more redily than the solder too.
Logged

Kevin C Cooper Esq
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Asymetry is the bane of my life


WWW
« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2010, 07:30:26 am »

It's an old brass garden tool, no idea about the solder.
Logged
sidecar_jon
Snr. Officer
****


« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2010, 01:14:30 pm »

Its probably lead solder then....don't eat it!

You can get "solder wick" or "De soldering sticks" meant for electronics, they might work but are really meant for smaller amounts.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solder_wick
« Last Edit: May 20, 2010, 01:18:23 pm by sidecar_jon » Logged
Kevin C Cooper Esq
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Asymetry is the bane of my life


WWW
« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2010, 01:29:24 pm »

I stopped eating solder ages ago, I don't think anything will shift what's left, I'll have to cover it with ornamentation. Or stick some cogs on! Don't tell Jinglejoe.
Logged
Captain Shipton Bellinger
Master Tinkerer
***
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Why the goggles..? In case of ADVENTURE!


WWW
« Reply #7 on: May 20, 2010, 04:26:50 pm »

If you've abraded the solder down to the level of the base metal and a patch is still showing, you could try pickling it.

All sorts of acid are used for pickling, but the safest, gentlest on your work, and easiest to dispose of is probably Vitex Safety Pickle. I've had some success with this, but abrasion is still more effective.  Undecided

Best of luck.

Logged

Capt. Shipton Bellinger R.A.M.E. (rtd)

JingleJoe
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
United Kingdom United Kingdom


The Green Dungeon Alchemist


WWW
« Reply #8 on: May 21, 2010, 12:10:44 am »

I stopped eating solder ages ago, I don't think anything will shift what's left, I'll have to cover it with ornamentation. Or stick some cogs on! Don't tell Jinglejoe.
Ha ha ha Tongue

Try putting miracle grow on the solder for a few hours - that turns it copper coloured, haven't done this myself but I have heard stories.
Logged

Green Dungeon Alchemist Laboratories
Providing weird sound contraptions and time machines since 2064.
phang
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States



« Reply #9 on: May 21, 2010, 12:59:51 am »

Solder wick. 'course depending on how much solder you are talking about you may need a good deal of wick.
Logged

N=R* x f(p) x n(e) x f(l) x f(i) x f(c) x L

So? Where is everyone?
Capt. Stockings
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States



WWW
« Reply #10 on: June 04, 2010, 08:06:22 am »

I've used a brass wire brush to turn solder brass-colored before. you might want to try that.
Logged

WillRockwell
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Revisiting history until we get it right


WWW
« Reply #11 on: June 04, 2010, 06:29:16 pm »

I always keep a solder sucker within reach, they jam up and frequently have to be broken down for cleaning, but are essential in removing excess solder. Also, once the solder is melted you can just whack the metal against something and all the solder will fly off....just be sure to stay upwind.
Logged

Dr cornelius quack
Rogue Ætherlord
*
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Arrant Carney. Phmebian Cultural Attache.


« Reply #12 on: June 04, 2010, 11:33:27 pm »

I've used the copper braided shield conductor from coaxial cable as solder wick in the past.

Only goes so far in getting the stuff off though.

A very light abrasive might be the only solution.

One suitably odd combination for brass polishing is and old, well worn pan scourer and a bottle of brown sauce. It cleans tarnished brass a treat.

Maybe masking the areas that are not solder coated and a light electro-chemical etching bath might work, effectively de-plating the solder from the area.
Logged

Such are the feeble bases on which many a public character rests.

Today, I am two, separate Gorillas.
Professor CaT Pardus
Deck Hand
*
United States United States



« Reply #13 on: June 13, 2010, 10:24:36 am »

You can try a heat gun on high, honestly nice easy way to get the solder liquid and then use the solder wick. With some things you can use the heat gun to basically blow the solder around but doesn't always work. If you don't want to invest in a heat gun or have other tools on hand etc. here two other ways.

1.  Desoldering pump (solder sucker)

    * Set the pump by pushing the spring-loaded plunger down until it locks.
    * Apply both the pump nozzle and the tip of your soldering iron to the joint.
    * Wait a second or two for the solder to melt.
    * Then press the button on the pump to release the plunger and suck the molten solder into the tool.
    * Repeat if necessary to remove as much solder as possible.
    * The pump will need emptying occasionally by unscrewing the nozzle.


Solder remover wick
2.  With solder remover wick (copper braid)

    * Apply both the end of the wick and the tip of your soldering iron to the joint.
    * As the solder melts most of it will flow onto the wick, away from the joint.
    * Remove the wick first, then the soldering iron.
    * Cut off and discard the end of the wick coated with solder.

good luck
Logged
Hardwick Steam Impl. Co.
Gunner
**
United States United States


You can find me in the lab...


WWW
« Reply #14 on: August 06, 2010, 11:06:06 pm »

If you are down to the last micron or two of solder left on the base metal, you will require an acid or abrasive. There is actually a molecular "intermetallic" bond between the solder and base metal.

I don't have any experience with acids, other than glass etching paste (might be worth a try). On the abrasive side, I would try sandblasting. If you use a fine grit you should be able to quickly remove the solder without seriously abraiding the surface of the base metal. You can then polish by your usual methods.

Alternatively, if you have enough patience you may find that steel wool is a bit more gentle and will require fewer polishing steps.
Logged

Dr. Emiel Kozlowski, at your service.
Oneiros
Zeppelin Captain
*****
England England


Lord of Glancairn


« Reply #15 on: August 08, 2010, 03:22:52 pm »

I've been in the electonics assembly industry for the last 18 years, and as far as I know, once a metalic area has been contaminated with solder, you'll never remove 100% of it.
Logged

What really matters is what you do with what you have. - H. G. Wells
Miles (a sailor)Martin
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


Just a head full of random thoughts


« Reply #16 on: September 24, 2010, 12:42:06 am »

As Oneirios said  once a part has ben solderd or brazed it is impossible to get all of the bonding metal out of the area. .all you can do is abrasivly remove the area contaminated if you are trying to weld it up. any remnant solder or brazing  in the area will ruin a weld 
Logged

Who you calling old, Sonny boy? Just because my birth certificate is on birch bark there isn't any reason to be calling names.
machinist for hire/ mechanic at large
Warning : minstrel with a five string banjo
Dr cornelius quack
Rogue Ætherlord
*
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Arrant Carney. Phmebian Cultural Attache.


« Reply #17 on: November 23, 2010, 10:12:08 pm »

A useful tool for removing small areas of excess solder is a 'fibre glass pencil' (RS part no. 514-868)
http://uk.rs-online.com/web/search/searchBrowseAction.html?method=searchProducts&searchTerm=514-868&x=11&y=17

Very gentle abrasive action and able to work on a small area.
Here's some results.

Before.

After.

Basically works like a microscopic needle gun and takes off the softer material preferentially, leaving the base metal with a light polish.


Apply all the usual precautions for working with raw fibre glass when using this one or you end up itching for days.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2010, 10:15:32 pm by Dr cornelius quack » Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.171 seconds with 18 queries.