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Author Topic: Aging wood, best method so far.  (Read 5492 times)
Professor Damien Tremens
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« Reply #25 on: May 31, 2010, 07:13:21 am »

Suggestion for finding old wood panels: Your local frame shop, especially the higher end ones.

I work in a fairly high end frame shop, and we get in old art in frames several times a month that are
being totally redone. Occasionally these old frame will have wood slats on the back side holding the art
in place. It's usually reasonably flat and not warped, usually 1/4" thick or so, and has a nice patina of
rough sawn wood with dirt and aged wood going for it.
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tophatdan
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I'm not Steampunk, I Live Steampunk....


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« Reply #26 on: August 04, 2010, 02:29:40 am »

an old woodworking trick that i was shown was that if you replaced an old board with a new one or placing new construction next to old and need it to match, meltonian shoe polish... it comes in dozens of colors so you can match anything and i swear with a little rubbing and buffing you can match almost any finish, making new look old and visa versa...
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you gotta love livin babe, cause dyin is a pain in the ass -----
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polyphemus
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« Reply #27 on: August 08, 2010, 08:18:33 pm »

One method for making those random knocks is called 'chaining'
You hit it with chains.
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Polphemus Pomfret
"Don't be silly. He wouldn't write,"Aaarrgghhh!"
"Perhaps he was dictating."
Birdnest
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« Reply #28 on: August 16, 2010, 07:06:04 pm »

my two cents ...

When we need to cover up fresh sawn ends and such on real antique timbers (usually some kind of hardwood) we use a mix of Iron Permanganate, coffee grounds and vinegar to replicate the original patina.  As for bashing in the wood, none of my antiques are dented much, and the patina is a blackened effect from years of human skin funk, or a yellowing (amber tint) of the original varnish - not much wearing around the edges though. Hardwood doesn't really dent much in the real world, unless the piece is really mistreated. As for softwood, place it in the trunk of your car for a month or two (or a clothes dryer for a faster effect!) to dent it in all the right places.

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Onward ho!
Birdnest
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« Reply #29 on: August 16, 2010, 07:08:13 pm »

sorry ... mis-behaving back woods internet is stalling, causing double posts.

sigh.
« Last Edit: August 16, 2010, 07:10:06 pm by Birdnest » Logged
Arvis
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Never underestimate the power of a hairless monkey


« Reply #30 on: August 18, 2010, 03:50:52 am »

 I have Abe Lincoln's axe!
It's only been through tweelve handles and three heads.  Roll Eyes
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DAG-NABBIT...I cut it and cut it and cut it... an it's STILL TOO SHORT!
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