The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
December 13, 2017, 12:15:44 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Support BrassGoggles! Donate once or $3/mo.
 See details here.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Steampunk idioms  (Read 9503 times)
fmra
Snr. Officer
****

Dollmaker


« on: March 01, 2007, 07:17:42 pm »

OK, so don't bite me for saying these are steampunk, but they do easily fit within the (mostly nonexistant) steampunk jargon.  Since my hobby is linguistic in nature, I figured we could gather idioms (or create them) for the jargon of a steampunk "culture"/genre/community/interest.

to slip a cog / to slip a gear - Lose one's ability to reason soundly or make correct judgments
to get your brain in gear - to make yourself start thinking clearly and effectively
to get in/into gear - to start to work effectively and with energy
to be in high gear - at the highest level of operation
to shift/switch gears - to suddenly change what you are doing

build/get/work up steam - to get enough energy, support, or enthusiasm to do something effectively
(at) full steam - as fast as possible
full steam ahead - with all possible energy and enthusiasm
let off / blow off steam - to do or say something that helps you to get rid of strong feelings or energy
pick up steam - to start to be much more effective or successful
run out of steam - to suddenly lose the energy or interest to continue doing what you are doing
under your own steam - without help from anyone else
(all) steamed up - angry or upset

a cog in the machine/wheel - one part of a large system or organization

as bold as brass - with too much confidence
get down to brass tacks - to start talking about the most important or basic facts of a situation
the top brass - the people with the highest rank in an organization, especially an army

be as regular as clockwork - it happens at exactly regular times
go/run/work like clockwork - it happens exactly as it was planned, without any problems
like clockwork - if something happens like clockwork, it happens at regular times

a train of thought - a series of connected thoughts

prime the pump - to do something in order to make something succeed
Logged

Tempus Rerum Imperator.

"But that's not steampunk hjghahkahjkfdsahjklfdsa!!!!!11one11" -- Anachronist

20,000 leagues below Chuck E' Cheese
Jake of All Trades
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


Brass addict, inventor, and scoundrel with a heart


WWW
« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2007, 08:53:39 pm »

Nice work!  Don't forget about this whole mess: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brass_monkey_%28colloquial_expression%29...
Logged

"...it's a form of fiction, and as such, while there may be times when it's considered a worthy vehicle for pointing out some of society and individual flaws - I still want a side that will let there be lighthearted adventures in the clouds, on mars, or under the sea."
--Tinkergirl
kiskolou
Snr. Officer
****

Subpelin Underlord


« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2007, 02:34:11 am »

My little brother never stops singing that song...
Logged

"There will always be a lost world for you here..." - Atterton




Your reality sir, is lies and balderdash and i am delighted to say i have no grasp of it whatsoever!
Tel Janin
Guest
« Reply #3 on: March 03, 2007, 08:53:49 am »

Brass monkey! That funky monkey!

I'm done.
Logged
VonBlimp
Guest
« Reply #4 on: March 03, 2007, 09:49:57 am »

I do enjoy a good idiom, so here are a few more:

A spanner in the works – Faced with a problem forcing one to stop and resolve the issue before continuing.
    Alternatively: Throwing a spanner in the works – To willingly/knowingly sabotage someone.

Running (smoothly) on tracks – Something or some one are proceeding smoothly, with no problems.

Derailed – To be distracted or “loose track” of an idea or project.

Several cogs short of a watch – A person that is (considered to be) mad/insane.
     Note: Anything can work with this formula. "Several [component] short of a [object containing
              previously mentioned component]"
 
Right, this one is purely invented, and do sound somewhat odd, but who knows, it might fit the bill:

Blimp for brains / Blimp head – A person considered to be a fool/simpleton. Modern day equivalent: Airhead.
« Last Edit: March 03, 2007, 10:09:28 am by VonBlimp » Logged
Jake of All Trades
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


Brass addict, inventor, and scoundrel with a heart


WWW
« Reply #5 on: March 03, 2007, 06:44:06 pm »

Blimp for brains / Blimp head – A person considered to be a fool/simpleton. Modern day equivalent: Airhead.

Ha!  I love it!
Logged
VonBlimp
Guest
« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2007, 03:44:17 pm »

Thank you sah, always nice to know that ones contributions are appreciated. Speaking of which, here is another one:

Blow a valve – To over exert one self, or, alternatively, to become enraged.
Logged
Sir Andrew
Guest
« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2007, 04:11:50 pm »

A spanner in the works – Faced with a problem forcing one to stop and resolve the issue before continuing.
    Alternatively: Throwing a spanner in the works – To willingly/knowingly sabotage someone.

A small note, pardon my nitpicking, but over in the U.S.A, it's "Throwing a monkey wrench in the works."
Logged
VonBlimp
Guest
« Reply #8 on: March 04, 2007, 05:00:39 pm »

A spanner in the works – Faced with a problem forcing one to stop and resolve the issue before continuing.
    Alternatively: Throwing a spanner in the works – To willingly/knowingly sabotage someone.

A small note, pardon my nitpicking, but over in the U.S.A, it's "Throwing a monkey wrench in the works."

Hmm. I do wonder if that then is a cultural/linguistic difference between GB and the US, or if I have heard wrong... I have heard the monkey wrench, true, but I seem to remember hearing equally many say spanner. Sadly we did not cover this saying in last years US/UK culture studies, so I have no idea. anyone out there know anything about this?
Logged
Jake von Slatt
Officer
***

Brunelian Contraptor


WWW
« Reply #9 on: March 04, 2007, 08:22:11 pm »

"Now you're cooking with gas!"
Logged

The Industrial Revolution . . . This time it's personal.
Fredrik von Drak
Deck Hand
*

« Reply #10 on: March 06, 2007, 10:12:56 pm »

Strange as a wooden watch.
Logged
S.Sprocket
Administrator
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Industria Proficiscor In!


« Reply #11 on: March 06, 2007, 10:45:08 pm »

in the US you don't normally call it a "spanner" unless it is very large. for example able to gap 3-4 inches. (about 10 centimeters)

Most people don't even know that unless they are a mechanic. most just call it a "wrench" regardless.  Normally if it's the kind you can adjust the gap on it's called a "cresent wrench"
Logged

"It's what a cove knows that counts, ain't it Sybil?  More than land or money, more than birth.  Information. Very flash." -Mick Radley

"Teaching boys to bake cakes? That's no way to maintain an industrial empire." --Fred Dibnah
OHebel Wring
Snr. Officer
****
The world is only 80 days away.


WWW
« Reply #12 on: March 06, 2007, 10:51:29 pm »

I get into these "American vs English" arguments quite frequently.


for a REAL laugh, ask the Brits what a fanny-pack is.


 Grin
Logged

“The world is full of obvious things which nobody by any chance ever observes. “
-Sherlock Holmes
Adml. Etherington
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States

Airship Pirate


« Reply #13 on: March 06, 2007, 10:56:25 pm »

I get into these "American vs English" arguments quite frequently.


for a REAL laugh, ask the Brits what a fanny-pack is.


 Grin
I dont know this one, so, any brit present, what is a fanny-pack to you?
Logged

The walls between art and engineering exist only in our minds.
 - Theo Jansen
S.Sprocket
Administrator
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Industria Proficiscor In!


« Reply #14 on: March 06, 2007, 10:56:37 pm »

that's a pack of cigarettes isn't it?
Logged
OHebel Wring
Snr. Officer
****
The world is only 80 days away.


WWW
« Reply #15 on: March 06, 2007, 11:02:21 pm »

They'll wake up in a few hours.
Logged
fixed_expression
Guest
« Reply #16 on: March 07, 2007, 12:14:55 am »

When Americans say Fanny-pack they mean this, right?

http://www.crazeone.com/MYSPACE/FANNY-PACK-1.gif

As far as I'm aware, we call that a "bum-bag" which is a name I've always hated personally, and would preclude me from wearing them even if they weren't patently absurd.

If there's an alternate British meaning to the words "fanny-pack" I'm not sure what it is...but if it exists, it's probably nsfw because we traditionally have a different meaning for the word fanny.
Logged
Tinkergirl
Brass Goggles Curator
Founders
Zeppelin Captain
********
United Kingdom United Kingdom


WWW
« Reply #17 on: March 07, 2007, 12:22:55 am »

Fanny-pack = bum-bag.  And no - one would not use the word fanny in polite company in the UK.
Similarly, the British slang of a cigarette - a fag - is guaranteed to raise a few eyebrows elsewhere.

Mind you, I still have to suppress a smirk when the Americans refer to pants.  I mean, pants!  When I was over in the US, someone commented to someone stood beside me: "Oh!  I've never seen you in pants before!"  Instant-double-take.  Oh, right - trousers.  I see.

As for idioms, generally I'll use spanner rather than monkeywrench.  Unfortunately, to call someone a spanner isn't the most complimentary of terms.  "You complete spanner!" would most likely be what you'd call someone when they messed up once again.  Also, in Scotland at least, to be "Steaming" means to be quite inebriated and definitely not fit to drive.
Logged
S.Sprocket
Administrator
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Industria Proficiscor In!


« Reply #18 on: March 07, 2007, 12:28:04 am »

You Steaming spanner! Don't make me pull a fag from my pants and put it in your fanny-pack!!
Logged
Otto Von Dieselbowser
Guest
« Reply #19 on: March 07, 2007, 01:09:20 am »

Quote
You Steaming spanner! Don't make me pull a fag from my pants and put it in your fanny-pack!!

I'm not even sure if that is physically possible??!! Undecided

Here in Oz the UK nomenclature seems dominant (depending on the subject)

If i need to loosen some nuts and bolts, depending on their size I might use one of my smaller spanners...
they have a circle on one end and a crescent on the other, like this...    o---c

Otherwise if its bigger or I haven't got the right size I'd get out my Shifting Spanner or "Shifter" for short, with the adjustable size opening.

BUT... As a valve / tube radio collector I notice that the UK and US have different numbering systems corresponding to the same kind of Valve. And although we use the UK expression "valve" more than "tube" we use the US numbering/identification system.
eg. We'd more likely be looking for a replacement 6V4 than a EZ80.
Logged
S.Sprocket
Administrator
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Industria Proficiscor In!


« Reply #20 on: March 07, 2007, 01:12:29 am »

the item you drew out 0----C i still a wrench here in the states... we're not very creative Cheesy
Logged
Jake of All Trades
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


Brass addict, inventor, and scoundrel with a heart


WWW
« Reply #21 on: March 07, 2007, 01:17:19 am »

Annnnnyway... What about "that really grinds my gears"?  I don't think it's been said, has it?
Logged
Otto Von Dieselbowser
Guest
« Reply #22 on: March 07, 2007, 01:27:36 am »

Quote
Annnnnyway... What about "that really grinds my gears"?  I don't think it's been said, has it?

Yup, that's a good one.
And sorry for getting off topic. That really "get's me steamed" when people do that.
Smiley
Logged
Jake of All Trades
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


Brass addict, inventor, and scoundrel with a heart


WWW
« Reply #23 on: March 07, 2007, 01:35:15 am »

And sorry for getting off topic.

No no, I enjoyed it  Grin
Logged
Kabuki
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


My physician claims there is something wrong...


WWW
« Reply #24 on: March 07, 2007, 09:23:36 pm »

By the same token...  "That lubes my gears/cogs/sprockets..."  Though it might be taken in an off-color manner.  Depending mostly upon the tone in which it is said. 
Logged

The only thing more important that squashing one's foe, is doing so with style and panache... - Jake of All Trades


Join the fun here: http://www.b
Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.194 seconds with 16 queries.