The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
October 23, 2017, 12:51:42 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Support BrassGoggles! Donate once or $3/mo.
 See details here.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: How to Make A Leather Holster  (Read 18418 times)
Prof Marvel
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


learn from history, or be doomed to repeat it


« on: March 21, 2010, 02:42:18 am »

After posting this repsonse elsewhere I thought I would expand upon it.

Generally Holsters and Leather go together like peanut butter and jelly, and everyone is looking for "good cheap leather", however good and cheap are often not synonymous. 

If you are in the US I would suggest you use Sir Google to find a Tandy or Leather Factory near you: www.tandyleatherfactory.com

For holster, knife sheath,  and heavy pouch  (ie binoculars and instrument cases)  purposes I prefer 6 oz or so cowhide but not much heavier than 8 oz. You do not need high quality carving stock such as shoulders, but a good vegetable tan (as opposed to chrome tanned) belly, bends,  are both cheap and effective. Saddle Skirting or Sole Leather is generally too stiff for our purposes and very clean shoulders and the like are reserved for fancy carving.

Avoid "other leathers" such as "splits",  pig, goat, deer, elk, etc as these are usually "soft tanned" for garment or uphostery use. You want stiff stuff, but you also want to avoid "rawhide" which is mainly used for drumheads, mocassin soles and Northern Plains Parfleche projects.

At the brick and mortar  stores you can find great deals in the "remnants bins" that you won't find in the catalogue or online. You may also be able to get remnants of "latigo" which is both affordable and ideal for holsters as it is already dyed a deep burgundy-brown. It can easily be shaped to your sidearm or instrument by soaking the finished product in alcohol and jamming the implement into the holster, followed by forming with fingers, rounded sticks, etc.

rather than duplicate work already doen by others, I offer these links for more on the processes of designing and forming holsters:

http://www.secretsquirrelleather.com/buildaholster.aspx
http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=84650
http://www.ar15adviser.com/forums/index.php?s=e5b9aa40295112fca87d95c602e45062&showtopic=15057
http://www.ggaub.com/ltag/mods/holster_leather_molded_drone.html


Kydex, a thermoplastic, can be used to heat-mold holsters, sheaths, and boxes.
Alternatively, for liteweight "gun replicas" one can use  its inexpensive thermoplastic counterpart found in  opaque Clorox Bottles, Kitty Litter Bottles, and small trash cans. Two excellent tutorials on using Kydex can be found here:
http://www.steyrclub.com/vb/showthread.php?t=2602
http://www.northcoastknives.com/northcoast_knives_tutorials_kydexsheath2.htm



yhs
prof marvel
Logged

Your Humble Servant
~~~~~Professor Algernon Horatio Ubiquitous Marvel The First~~~~~~
President, CEO, Chairman,  and Chief Bottle Washer of
Professor Marvel's Traveling Apothecary and Fortune Telling Emporium

Acclaimed By The Crowned Heads of Europe
Purveyor of Patent Remedies, Snake Oil, Cleaning Supplies, Dry Goods, and Picture Postcards
Offering Unwanted Advice for All Occasions and Providing Useless Items to the Gentry
Since 1822
Zwack
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States

And introducing the wonderful Irish (Mrs Z).


« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2010, 04:20:02 pm »

It really isn't that difficult, and there is nothing wrong with using carving quality leather for Holsters...

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Those holsters (for a lighter in fact) are carved and then painted.

Z.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2010, 04:29:49 pm by Zwack » Logged

"At least those oddballs are interesting" - My Wife.
I'm British but living in America.  This might explain my spelling.
Prof Marvel
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


learn from history, or be doomed to repeat it


« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2010, 07:05:20 pm »

Ah, Very nicely done, my Dear Zwack! Beautiful floral work!

Would that I had such skill at carving leather, as we can see from your work it really adds a classical touch! I fear I am only good at cutting, stitching, and stamping. My own work is thus functional but rather plain and perhaps homely.

Does that little grip poking out perhaps belong to a turn-of-the-century breaktop?

yhs
Prof Marvel
Logged
Zwack
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States

And introducing the wonderful Irish (Mrs Z).


« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2010, 01:14:19 am »

Would that it did...

My wife's uncle has a collection of "Gambler's guns" and some very interesting examples...  However that is a cigarette lighter of all things.  Smiley

Z.
Logged
akumabito
Immortal
**
Netherlands Netherlands


Mundus Patria Nostra!


WWW
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2010, 03:33:01 pm »

I just did a quick mock-up of a Mexican double-loop holster using roughly this pattern: http://eightbits.home.att.net/Crafting14_web_Mex_Holster.PDF
I quickly found out that although the design works well, I'd be needig A LOT of material to hold my raygun prototype.. I taped 4 pages of printer aper together, and it still was too short. I'll have to give it another try, see what happens.. Smiley
Logged

Zwack
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States

And introducing the wonderful Irish (Mrs Z).


« Reply #5 on: April 01, 2010, 02:03:52 am »

The two in that photo are based on a Mexican double loop... One only has a single loop, but they are fairly short.

However you have to use a significantly larger piece of leather as it needs to be wide enough for both sides of a Holster, and long enough for the holster and the loop backing.

I'm about to make another holster (for a real gun this time) and will be making it without the loop part and adding a patch on the back to hold the belt clip I will be using.  This one is for a concealed carry weapon.

Z.
Logged
Zwack
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States

And introducing the wonderful Irish (Mrs Z).


« Reply #6 on: April 15, 2010, 12:13:09 am »

Here's the holster I ended up making for someone else...

http://www.mutant.net/LeatherWork/Holster/

Z.
Logged
Voltin
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Mystery Airship Captain


« Reply #7 on: April 15, 2010, 12:31:20 am »

I made this holster for use with my Star Wars costumes. It is strong enough to hold my eight to ten pound Master Replicas E-11 Blaster.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

It was the first holster I ever made and was alot of fun.

I also recommend Tandy leather. They were very helpful and should have everything you would need.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2010, 12:35:42 am by Voltin » Logged

"We often mingle with the world, but our discovery is hidden away, as it can be in a small compass, and no one suspects who or what we are. We pass as tourists among our fellow-men" - Mystery Airship Pilot 1858-1898
Agustus de Winter
Deck Hand
*
Netherlands Netherlands



« Reply #8 on: April 15, 2010, 06:46:56 pm »

http://www.leprevo.co.uk/

I have found these kind people to be of use for Leather in the UK.  That and they do sales :-D
Logged

Some men see things as they are and ask why. Others dream things that never were and ask why not.
George Bernard Shaw
Lost Locket
Swab

Netherlands Netherlands


I can't fly, but I can make you a sandwich

AirshipPirate
WWW
« Reply #9 on: April 20, 2010, 08:48:03 pm »

I made this holster for my Nerf Maverick some time ago.
Not convenient in real battles, but I love the straps, and you can hang it from your belt with the two loops.
I might make it shorter at the end since it's sticking out from underneath the gun.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)
Logged

Lost and never found Again
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.245 seconds with 17 queries.