The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
October 19, 2017, 07:24:01 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Support BrassGoggles! Donate once or $3/mo.
 See details here.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Question for all the serious metal workers... how do you wash your hands?  (Read 4971 times)
greensteam
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Steamed up from birth


« Reply #25 on: March 22, 2010, 12:14:01 am »

I have to second Dr. G's reccommendation of Swarfega. It's great at cutting through the stains. If you need a little boost to get the stains out of your hands, try mixing a little washing powder in with it too. Works a treat. It'll probably help with residual odours too.

Wow that takes me back. I had totally forgotten the washing powder thing until you mentioned it.

Unlike Angus, I never liked barrier cream and was fortunate enough never to suffer from the dermatitis that plagued many (male) colleagues.

I do recall the appalling pictures in colour in the Ship Captain's medical guide of what happens if you dont wash the oil off your self and your boiler suit. Scrota never looked so vile........
Logged

So it's every hand to his rope or gun, quick's the word and sharp's the action. After all... Surprise is on our side.
jringling
Time Traveler
****
United States United States


convicted Rogue and Vagabond…long story…


WWW
« Reply #26 on: March 22, 2010, 12:44:15 am »

I appreciate all of the replies... I knew someone here could help!

I tried a trick similar to the barrier cream... I rubbed the wife's foulest smelling lotion on my hands (some horrid floral scent... midnight blossoms?) about 1/2 hour before working with my etch tank. I found that my normally dry skin didn't soak up the stray solution from the work pieces, so the stains and brassy smell were nowhere near as bad as normal. After a liberal application of LAVA, my hands were almost passable as clean!
Logged

Miles (a sailor)Martin
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


Just a head full of random thoughts


« Reply #27 on: March 29, 2010, 11:59:14 pm »

Stoddard Solvent first, then Palmolive bar soap second.
if no solvent the Gojo citris handcleaner first the the Palmolive bar soap
 been doing it that way for 42 years . started at 8 years old "helping" grandpa in the shop while he was sewing the wings up on his Piper SuperCub.
                                                                   
                                                         No I am not BSing you ,when I can get the slides converted to digital format i will put them up
                                                              Miles (a sailor) (just an old fart) Martin
Logged

Who you calling old, Sonny boy? Just because my birth certificate is on birch bark there isn't any reason to be calling names.
machinist for hire/ mechanic at large
Warning : minstrel with a five string banjo
Pheobsky
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom

A Gentleman.


WWW
« Reply #28 on: March 30, 2010, 12:09:34 am »

I generally use washing up liquid and a spoonful of sugar or salt as an abrasive.
I'd second this suggestion- maybe not as good as the purpose made soap/gel stuff, but it works pretty d*mn well.
Logged

There's nothing finer than going to the 192O's for a dance!
sidecar_jon
Snr. Officer
****


« Reply #29 on: March 30, 2010, 06:28:24 pm »

I generally use washing up liquid and a spoonful of sugar or salt as an abrasive.
I'd second this suggestion- maybe not as good as the purpose made soap/gel stuff, but it works pretty d*mn well.

And with the added advantage that if you use salt you find all those tiny cuts you have inflicted on yourself...
Logged

cptn. C
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States



« Reply #30 on: April 05, 2010, 11:06:20 am »

i have found that hand sanitizer works to cut that taste off my hands, or rub a handful of soil over your hands before you wash them
Logged

if you don't live for something, you die for nothing
General Ninian Banks
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


Most Interesting Man in the World


WWW
« Reply #31 on: April 06, 2010, 04:32:27 am »

I use coal tar shampoo to wash my hands (and hair) and it gets rid of the smell, and stains...It smells like new tires but I like it! Cheesy
Logged

Conversation begins a man. Education completes him.
Artorius
Officer
***
United States United States


Gentleman of Opportunity


« Reply #32 on: April 11, 2010, 04:33:17 pm »

When I was armouring full time the 16 gauge steel came with an awful black rust proofing. The easiest way to get it off was soaking in ammonia. Lovely.

So I had huge tubs with gallons of ammonia solutions and had to stack all the steel pieces in them for an overnight and rearrange them with dowel racks. It was nasty but a lot easier than any other option plus it left the surface perfect.

The smell of ammonia was everywhere.

I learned to use "Magic Gloves" or "Liquid Gloves". It's a tube of paste. You rub it over your hands and it creates a chemical barrier. Works great for people who do precision work but want a layer of protection. The stuff isn't good for much else but it does prevent the nasty from soaking into your skin.

Gojo with Pumice, as said by a few. The stuff rocks. Dawn dish detergant works great on grease. Not sure how it'd do with smells.
Logged

The Right and Honorable Lord Mnkeeboy, Chief Jester to The King and Plotter of Evil Machiavellian Plots, Puller of Strings, Dastardly Abuser of Love, Hypnotizer of Truth and Whose True Power remains Hidden by a Position of Seeming Inconsequence.

Off-The-Grid
escherblacksmith
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


« Reply #33 on: June 23, 2010, 05:41:13 pm »

I don't mess with brass . . . but . . . after doing ironwork of various sorts, I have used both Lava and Gojo with pumice as kind of a first pass.  Then I'd use a solvent (quick dip in gasoline, no, not recommended).  then I'd use handfuls of nice wide-bladed grass.  Rub my hands with that until smelling of green.  Then wash with soap.

Almost couldn't tell that I had been doing stuff.  (Does not work on the beard so well, however)
Logged
kylepaul
Deck Hand
*
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #34 on: June 24, 2010, 04:16:40 am »

I'll add my support for swarfega, or anything similar, for removing stains and the like. As for the smell, lemon juice or washing up liquid with real lemon juice in it. Sounds strange but it works a treat and not just for light smells either, personal experience may have involved a cruise ship's sewage treatment plant springing a leak.  Sad
Logged
ganghiss
Gunner
**
United States United States


« Reply #35 on: June 24, 2010, 06:55:57 am »

Lava or Gojo with the grit, or any soap with apricot grit works as an initial washing, Then grab a piece of stainless steel (knife, block, etc.) and rub it along your skin under running water with some basic dish soap or normal hand soap (this removes the smell of metals, onion, and garlic).
Logged
Tinker
Snr. Officer
****

Edisonade adventurer and maker of gadgets.


« Reply #36 on: July 18, 2010, 05:15:23 pm »

I use a scouring powder called 'barkeeper's friend'.  It's a mixture of soap powder, abrasive, and oxalic acid.  It takes metal oxides right off.  It's also good (designed for, actually) brightening copper and brass.  I follow it up with some dish detergent or abrasive hand soap like 'Lava'.
Logged
Dorian Ambrose
Guest
« Reply #37 on: July 25, 2010, 12:18:17 pm »

No question about it.. Swarfega work pretty well.
The major downside to it, is that the smell of Swarfega is far from pleasant.

I always use lemon juice and salt. Not only does it remove oil, grease and dirt, better than any commercial hand cleaner, it also smells nice.
Just remember to moisturise you hands afterwards.   
Logged
amakusa
Swab

United States United States


« Reply #38 on: August 16, 2010, 04:52:43 pm »

tomato juice and vodka-works wonders
Logged
jringling
Time Traveler
****
United States United States


convicted Rogue and Vagabond…long story…


WWW
« Reply #39 on: August 16, 2010, 05:18:17 pm »

tomato juice and vodka-works wonders

Add alittle Worcestershire, Tabasco, salt the rim with Old Bay, mmm.... makes everything all better...

 Grin
Logged
DrArclight
Zeppelin Captain
*****

« Reply #40 on: August 23, 2010, 09:35:29 pm »

I buy some hand cleaner called Orange Goop.  Comes in a gallon container with a pump on top.  It has orange oil, pumice and some sort of liquid soap in it.  It'll clean pretty much everything off your hands.  Actually, anything that contains orange oil will be a great hand cleaner.  It'll remove stains and smell/taste.

And the hilarious thing is that my cat HATES when I use it.  She wrinkles up her nose and runs as far away from the sink as possible and won't let me pet her until I have used another soap to wash the orange smell off my hands.  (Interestingly enough I read somewhere, wikipedia maybe, that all cats have an instinctive dislike of citrus scents.  So if you need to repel a cat, use lemon or orange oils.)
Logged
Dave_G
Gunner
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom



WWW
« Reply #41 on: August 31, 2010, 05:27:01 pm »

Swarfega...I use the orange one with grains in it. Used to use "Boraxo" A twenty mule team product ( I'm guessing it was an American product, basically Borax  ?)
Also used clean engine oil to get my hands clean when working on site with no washing facilities
Logged

"Watcher of the skies.... watcher of all"
Captain
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding.


WWW
« Reply #42 on: August 31, 2010, 07:50:56 pm »

When I work with aluminum, steels, pewter, brass, etc...  ( I hate the aluminum "smurf" blue look) I have been using Dawn dishwashing detergent.  I wash and dry my hands twice though before handling anything especially food.  This seems to get rid of all staining and smell or I would hear about it form my wife. 
Logged

-Karl
bicyclebuilder
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Netherlands Netherlands


A.K.A. Scanner Camera Builder


« Reply #43 on: November 11, 2010, 02:03:09 pm »

Use handcreme before working with metal or grease makes the dirt and grease stick less to your hands and is easier to wash off. Washing and drying twice helps to. Any garage sope would do.
I know if you want to get rid of the smell of fish off your hands, you can use coins (metal). Maybe it also works the other way around? Handle fish after working with metal to get rid of the metal smell? Huh
Logged

The best way to learn is by personal experience.
MinervaLiRenfield
Officer
***
Canada Canada



WWW
« Reply #44 on: December 15, 2010, 05:38:39 am »

I remember using a product called FAST Orange growing up for out at the farm.  My gods was it good for everything.  You might also try rinsing your hands in lemon juice, just make sure to use a good moisturizer afterwards.
Logged

Professor Oilcan
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Steam in the blood, birthday 10th March,


« Reply #45 on: March 17, 2011, 09:25:52 pm »

I know... sounds kinda simple, but I am having a tough time finding a soap that will cut the brass stains and smell from my hands... Anybody have any suggestions?

And I know I should be wearing gloves, but I have the small cuts to prove that gloves would not hold up to the work I do...

I don't use gloves, I don't know if you have it in the states but we use Swarfega, this is a none gritty cleaner that cleans of oil and dirt, very easily, then you can wash your hands with simple soap done in minutes.

Logged

Professor G O Pivot Oilcan
Teacher of mad Steam related mayhem, mentor to a few mad scientists and owner of the Imperial Steam Powered Airship and Transportation Company.
sidecar_jon
Snr. Officer
****


« Reply #46 on: March 17, 2011, 10:48:23 pm »

Recently i had the fun and games of dipping my long hair in a bowl of hot very black old engine oil. I discovered that olive oil will displace the dirty oil and make it easy to wash out. Indeed black oily hands will clean off easily if you first "wash" them in olive oil then soap...
Logged
jringling
Time Traveler
****
United States United States


convicted Rogue and Vagabond…long story…


WWW
« Reply #47 on: March 18, 2011, 03:08:21 am »

Recently i had the fun and games of dipping my long hair in a bowl of hot very black old engine oil. I discovered that olive oil will displace the dirty oil and make it easy to wash out. Indeed black oily hands will clean off easily if you first "wash" them in olive oil then soap...

A friend of mine swears by chicken grease....

The best thing I found to cut the brass smell is bleach... which does make sense on the chemistry level... about 1/2 cup in the hands, scrub vigorously, and rinse for 10 minutes, then follow with some good soap. This even gets under the nails clean...
Logged
Steamworkshop
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Accurate reproductions of items that never existed


WWW
« Reply #48 on: March 19, 2011, 04:13:09 pm »

I use Fast Orange hand cleaner with a squirt of dish soap and hot water. It seems to work pretty well.
Logged

Capt. Stockings
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States



WWW
« Reply #49 on: March 21, 2011, 02:01:26 am »

I sometimes try to put lotion on my hands before working to keep gunk from soaking into my skin, and then after I wash them (sometimes multiple times) with Gojo orange. As for the smell/taste of brass, I can't say that I really notice it. I'm usually in the shop three or four days a week, so I guess I'm used to it.
Logged

Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.109 seconds with 17 queries.