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Author Topic: Back to basics.  (Read 3687 times)
Laserpunk
Officer
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United States United States


Rogue Laser Enthusiast


« Reply #25 on: March 14, 2010, 06:51:46 am »

Check out this steamy tool.


http://cgi.ebay.com/ANTIQUE-STEAM-ENGINE-TOY-DRILL-PRESS-PUNCH-1900S_W0QQitemZ230447844059QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item35a7c30adb

Wish I had the money to score this.

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Don't be proud of something you bought, be proud of something you built.

Companies I personally endorse for lasers, and accessories. Don't get ripped off on eBay.

www.O-like.com www.rayfoss.com www.dragonlasers.com www.optotronics.com

For parts, diodes and modules http://www.modwerx.com/
Miles (a sailor)Martin
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


Just a head full of random thoughts


« Reply #26 on: March 30, 2010, 12:37:53 am »

when i was just getting started in Control/line model airplane building  my dad made me a set of hobby knives out of hacksaw blades and automotive heater hose those and a good arkansaw stone to sharpen with i still have and still use 39 years later... god bless it has been that long.
                                                    Miles (a sailor)Martin
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Who you calling old, Sonny boy? Just because my birth certificate is on birch bark there isn't any reason to be calling names.
machinist for hire/ mechanic at large
Warning : minstrel with a five string banjo
Dr cornelius quack
Rogue Ætherlord
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


Arrant Carney. Phmebian Cultural Attache.


« Reply #27 on: March 30, 2010, 01:28:20 am »

Indeed, Home made can be a great way to go. Specially if you're recycling stuff that is past its best for the original purpose.

Can I suggest clothes pegs as a good way of equipping yourself with a good number of clamps for light holding and gripping jobs.
The single piece molded ones with a coil spring in the back work well and give quite a strong clamping force for their size.

Perfect for long lap seams while waiting for glue to dry.

They can also be shaped to grip onto sections other than flat sheet.

They can also be used to hold plans on a drawing board or for hanging clothes out to dry.

Maybe, Miles, a little discourse on sharpening stones may be of use? Huh? Huh?

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Today, I am two, separate Gorillas.
Athanor
Zeppelin Admiral
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Canada Canada


Keep them off-balance and brazen it out!


« Reply #28 on: April 09, 2010, 08:32:40 am »

Yes, clamps. There's no such thing as too many clamps. All sizes of clamps, from clothes pegs to 3ft long bar clamps, from dinky little plastic ones you can buy in sets at any decent bargain store at about $5 for a dozen, to heavy duty monsters that can barely be lifted in one hand. Spring clamps, screw clamps, deepthroat clamps, surgical hemostats, corner clamps...... 
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"Truly I say to you, he who seeks, shall find. And quite often, he shall wish he hadn't."

              - Elias Ashmole Crackbone.
MissTwist
Officer
***
Australia Australia


« Reply #29 on: April 18, 2010, 02:25:13 pm »

*Steps gingerly into the boys territory*

Ahem, hello.

My main tool have all been mentioned so I hope you don't mind me extending a bit on what the others have said... I work with bone, though have decided to look into recycling broken antique wood.

Needle Files: Good quality, buy the best you can afford. I use diamond needle files as they last much longer. The initial outlay is worth not having to replace them 6 months later.

Dremel: If you work with relatively small projects and softer materials a cordless dremel is excellent. They don't do so well on large, hard objects apparently, but they're lovely for detail work on my bone work.


Additionally:

1 large, heavy duty file. There are things nail files just don't cut it for. I have a circular one and a flat one amongst my collection.


Actually, really, I do advice buying the absolute best you can afford to buy. It will save you a lot of money replacing things later, but don't put off starting because you can't afford top of the range. Cheaper products will do the job just keep an eye on them to make sure blades aren't going blunt, files still have rough surfaces on them etc.
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shoeshine
Officer
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United States United States



WWW
« Reply #30 on: April 22, 2010, 09:22:49 am »

For anyone working with more durable materials (metal, wood, leather, etc..) the tool that I find myself reaching for more than any other by an order of magnitude, is my drill.

My particular of choice, a dewalt 9.6v cordless with trigger lock and torque control.

Besides its most obvious function of making holes;

any number of wire and bristle brushes/sanding pads/buffing wheels chucked up allows effortless surface finish.

grinding stones, boring tools, rasps make for easy shaping.

held in a vise, it becomes all sorts of stationary machines for small parts.  A rough and ready lathe, spindle sander, etc...

geared low it becomes a screw extractor, an impact wrench, and more ad nauseum.

anyway , my $.02
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Slackratchet
Gunner
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United States United States



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« Reply #31 on: May 06, 2010, 08:37:07 pm »

I know I'm new here, this being my first post, but I must comment. The one tool that gets used in each and every project are my dial calipers. If any one thing is of supreme important to the materials I work in it is precision measurement. I use and swear by Starrett brand, which aren't the cheapest out there, but my set had been in my family quite a while so I may be biased. Any set is better than no set at all.

SR.
« Last Edit: May 06, 2010, 09:07:47 pm by Slackratchet » Logged

... takes the path of most resistance.
Sir Nikolas Vendigroth
Captain Spice
Immortal
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #32 on: May 06, 2010, 10:32:31 pm »

Sharp tools (files, knives, drill bits, grinding belts), a flat surface (I use a piece of glass from a microwave) and a selection of interesting chemicals (Selenium-based bluing gel, ferric chloride and some organic solvents)

And metal stock, of course.
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Quote from: elShoggotho
HE WRESTLES BEARS, HE DRINKS HIS ALE, HE LOVES HIS AUTUNITE! ON WEDNESDAYS HE GOES SHOPPING, THIS SONG IS UTTER SHI-

PM me about adding a thread to the OT archive!

_|¯¯|_
r[]_[]
Dr cornelius quack
Rogue Ætherlord
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Arrant Carney. Phmebian Cultural Attache.


« Reply #33 on: May 07, 2010, 02:15:29 am »

OK Nik, That's the ingredients sorted out, what about the method??
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Vagabond GentleMan
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United States United States


Clockwork Sepia


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« Reply #34 on: May 07, 2010, 02:58:06 am »

The Best Tool:

A cutting edge.  Essentially, a knife.

Come on, folks!  It's Humankind's OLDEST tool, and everything that you see around you, all buildings and sculptures, all machines, rocketships and cars, are essentially built with the combination of the cutting edge and application of fire, with the exception of maybe woven stuff and fabrics, which still use the cutting edge, but not so much the fire, usually.

The Knife: about 2.5 million years old.
That's The Tool.
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Why the goggles..? In case of ADVENTURE!


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« Reply #35 on: May 07, 2010, 07:21:00 am »

The Best Tool:

A cutting edge.  Essentially, a knife.


Sorry, Vagabond Gentleman - that was my second choice after a steel rule.

In hindsight I would make it my first choice.

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Capt. Shipton Bellinger R.A.M.E. (rtd)

Slackratchet
Gunner
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United States United States



WWW
« Reply #36 on: May 07, 2010, 08:31:24 am »

Sharp tools (files, knives, drill bits, grinding belts), a flat surface (I use a piece of glass from a microwave)

Using glass as a cutting surface is exceptionally hard on a knives edge. I would use scrap wood or the aforementioned cutting mat.
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