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Author Topic: Resources for Working with Horn?  (Read 778 times)
Simon Hogwood
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United States United States


Adventurer & Scholar


« on: March 08, 2010, 01:30:33 am »

Hi, everybody. I recently picked up a half-completed powder horn that I'm going to try to convert to a blowing horn. In preperation for this project, can anybody point me to some information about similar projects, or about working with horn generally? Many thanks.  Smiley
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sebastian Inkerman
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England England


scrounger and builder of mildly interesting stuff.

S_Inkerman
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2010, 02:28:00 am »

The one piece of advice that I can offer you is that if you need to ream the horn out any more than it already is or need to do any sanding on it, get a decent quality vapour mask. Dust masks don't catch enough of the extremely fine dust that this process produces.
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twilightbanana
Snr. Officer
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Netherlands Netherlands


« Reply #2 on: March 10, 2010, 04:13:38 pm »

Here's some info on working horn:

http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/horn/hornhome.html

From there you can find the following article:

http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/horn/hblast.html

A horn is a very simple instrument, being just a long tube with a shaped mouthpiece. There is no reed. Like a trumpet, a horn is played by blowing air through closed lips, producing a "buzzing" sound which starts a standing wave vibration in the air column inside the horn. The most important bit of shaping you need is for the mouthpiece, which needs to be wide enough to fit your lips. You'll want to round off the edges for comfort.

The length of the horn determines the notes you can get out of it. A very short horn - like a powder horn for instance - can't produce as deep a tone as a longer one. Also, a short horn is harder to blow.
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Simon Hogwood
Zeppelin Admiral
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United States United States


Adventurer & Scholar


« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2010, 07:12:42 am »

twilightbanana, that site is exactly what I was looking for - thanks a bunch!

(Hmm . . . somehow, I expected the mouthpiece to be  more complex than that!  Shocked)

sebastian Inkerman, I shall definitely keep your advice in mind.
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