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Author Topic: Is Biohacking 'Steampunk'  (Read 2001 times)
Sgt.Major Thistlewaite
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I am, therefore I think.


« Reply #25 on: February 20, 2010, 02:25:32 pm »

Well, brother, whatever floats your boat! Wink I suppose my aversion to plastic may be ascribed to the fact that I am old enough to have been around almost as long as it has, and I have watched the world change from the well-crafted wood and glass and metal everyday objects built in the 1940's to being almost exclusively composed of plastic. Everything from vacuum cleaners (I still have an old Electrolux, made of metal, with a woven cloth hose and a cloth bag which is not disposable, but is emptied and reused, and has never had to be replaced) to mayonnaise jars (which used to be made of glass, with a metal lid..now they are made of plastic, with a plastic lid) has been cheapened and subjected to the "use it once and throw it away" school of thought, and planned obsolescence is the order of the day. To my way of thinking, to have something made of wood, metal and glass means "quality," and to have it made of plastic means "cheap crap." I reiterate- I hate plastic. I guess those who have never known anything else have less of a negative reaction to it.

Thistlewaite, the curmudgeon.

But just for the record, I never said gluing plumbing parts to plastic guns WAS Steampunk, just that it was fun. Cheers.
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Yet well thy soul hath brooked the turning tide, with that innate, untaught philosophy,Which, be it wisdom, coldness, or deep pride, is gall and wormwood to an enemy.
markf
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« Reply #26 on: February 20, 2010, 04:18:50 pm »

'is X steampunk ?' is the wrong sort of question and it doesn't really mean anything. Rather more useful questions are is this relevant? is it useful ? does it have value ?

Are penguins "steampunk?"  No. 
Unless they were trained to infiltrate and sabotage an Antarctic base of Wellsian Martians, or if a single penguin is fitted with a jet-pack, or if the penguins were given a dose of Hyde Serum and turned in to evil maitre d's, then these penguins are Steampunk.

Did someone mention potentially steamy penguins?  Ah, Batman 2 to the rescue. markf
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_2kjisMm3M9Y/Sx0RXCRqWHI/AAAAAAAALDM/y_jKz0iDHnw/s400/penguin-commando-model-kit-models.gif
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US ARMY-WORKING HARDER, NOT SMARTER. Steampunk Smart Car & Office Cubicle, Levitating Mossarium, Dive Pocket Watch; 1915 Wilson Goggles/Swing-Arm Monocular; Boiling Tube Lamp; Pocket Watch/Cell Phone; Air Kraken Augmentotron. http://sites.google.com/site/steampunkretrofuturedesignsmd
NazT
Guest
« Reply #27 on: February 22, 2010, 10:21:21 am »

...and those who glue gears to something and then call it "Steampunk" give me a pain in the posterior. Could biohacking be done in a Steampunk way? Absolutely! Is all biohacking Steampunk? Certainly not. Whatever Steampunk is, it is not defined solely by being "Do It Yourself." Every dragster ever built has been DIY...but that doesn't make them Steampunk. However, the Munster Coach and Drag-U-La, designed by George Barris, certainly could be. Without at least a nod to Victorian style, it can't be called Steampunk, in my opinion. Otherwise, everything is Steampunk, and nothing is Steampunk.

~T
I agree with this.  I also get a tad bored by stuff described as steampunk just because it has a gear stuck to it.
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Mr Mephistopheles Grimm
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« Reply #28 on: February 24, 2010, 03:12:46 am »

That's a position I can agree with, Thistlewaite. Quality is reflected by the materials used just as much as by the level of craftsmanship. I would have to guess my affinity for plastic and gel-like things comes from the fact my father used to make all kinds of plastic at his work. I remember being a little boy and seeing a giant sculpture of plastic wire. I would look in it and see so many different things, a face, a tornado/whirlwind, anything and everything- depending on how long I stared at it. But that's another subject all together.


 'is X steampunk ?' is the wrong sort of question and it doesn't really mean anything. Rather more useful questions are is this relevant? is it useful ? does it have value ?

I think, despite my earlier posts, that this says all that can be said for this topic.
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Angus McCarthy
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« Reply #29 on: February 27, 2010, 02:26:09 am »


 'is X steampunk ?' is the wrong sort of question and it doesn't really mean anything. Rather more useful questions are is this relevant? is it useful ? does it have value ?

And THAT, my friends, is what I consider to be the true ethos of SP.

Not "is it shiny" or "does it have gears" but whether a thing you are making or doing has intrinsic and lasting value. Building beautiful things to last rather than crass disposablility.

And to that end, creating a social environment based on the same principles - gentility, respect, charity.


That, at least to me, is Steampunk.
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Flynn MacCallister
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« Reply #30 on: February 27, 2010, 03:21:12 am »


 'is X steampunk ?' is the wrong sort of question and it doesn't really mean anything. Rather more useful questions are is this relevant? is it useful ? does it have value ?

Amen.
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MalContent
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Swindler, Con Man and Gentleman Thief


« Reply #31 on: February 27, 2010, 05:49:01 am »



Not "is it shiny" or "does it have gears" but whether a thing you are making or doing has intrinsic and lasting value. Building beautiful things to last rather than crass disposablility.

And to that end, creating a social environment based on the same principles - gentility, respect, charity.

[/quote]

I agree to a point on this...however I would like to through a devil-advocate point of view into the mix....the Victorian Era was the beginning of the disposable society...with mass production and later the mass production products and things became cheaper...sure there were still artisans who hand -etched silverware but pressed and punched sheet metal utensils were more common throughout.  Like I said it was the beginning....and I think that SP for me embodies the end of gentility, artistry of everyday objects and the beginning of the common man and common things.

My personal take on SP is that of a sideshow performer...I have a number of acts that I have worked on and have built all my own props...not because Sideshow performers are inherently steampunk but because no one makes what I need.  So I guess steampunk goes way beyond DIY and History and into what you make of it.  Personally DIY bodily performances fall into SP simply because I have decided that it does.

Just my two cent...love to hear the thoughts of others...cause it amazes me how often this debate occurs...Its Steampunk!  Enjoy it!
« Last Edit: February 27, 2010, 07:00:59 pm by MalContent » Logged

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Vorpal Bandersnatch
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« Reply #32 on: February 27, 2010, 10:24:56 am »


I agree to a point on this...however I would like to through a devil-advocate point of view into the mix....the Victorian Era was the beginning of the disposable society...


I feel like much of what you said was spot-on, but I must disagree with this point. Victorians may have developed the idea of mass-produced goods, but the concept of disposability was still a rather foreign one. The assembly line, planned obsolescence, and plastics wouldn't get into full swing until well into the 20th Century.

You were correct in your assessment of the grand equalization that happened through industrialization. The availability of inexpensive goods to all was a great contributor to innovation and progress. Much like the revolution of the internet has made information, knowledge, and community accessible to billions of people that otherwise wouldn't have had it.
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Philosophy, discovery, art, every sort of skill, every sort of service, love; these are the means of salvation from that narrow loneliness of desire, that brooding preoccupation with self and egotistical relationships, which is hell for the individual, treason to the race, and exile from God.[Wells]
MalContent
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


Swindler, Con Man and Gentleman Thief


« Reply #33 on: February 27, 2010, 06:57:59 pm »


I agree to a point on this...however I would like to through a devil-advocate point of view into the mix....the Victorian Era was the beginning of the disposable society...


I feel like much of what you said was spot-on, but I must disagree with this point. Victorians may have developed the idea of mass-produced goods, but the concept of disposability was still a rather foreign one. The assembly line, planned obsolescence, and plastics wouldn't get into full swing until well into the 20th Century.

You were correct in your assessment of the grand equalization that happened through industrialization. The availability of inexpensive goods to all was a great contributor to innovation and progress. Much like the revolution of the internet has made information, knowledge, and community accessible to billions of people that otherwise wouldn't have had it.

You are correct...I was not trying to state that Victorians were the 1st disposable society merely that the concept of disposability and more simplistic easily affordable goods via mass production was the beginning of what could later be dubbed the disposable society. 
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Amaterasu2314
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United States United States


« Reply #34 on: February 27, 2010, 10:22:18 pm »

Well, brother, whatever floats your boat! Wink I suppose my aversion to plastic may be ascribed to the fact that I am old enough to have been around almost as long as it has, and I have watched the world change from the well-crafted wood and glass and metal everyday objects built in the 1940's to being almost exclusively composed of plastic. Everything from vacuum cleaners (I still have an old Electrolux, made of metal, with a woven cloth hose and a cloth bag which is not disposable, but is emptied and reused, and has never had to be replaced) to mayonnaise jars (which used to be made of glass, with a metal lid..now they are made of plastic, with a plastic lid) has been cheapened and subjected to the "use it once and throw it away" school of thought, and planned obsolescence is the order of the day. To my way of thinking, to have something made of wood, metal and glass means "quality," and to have it made of plastic means "cheap crap." I reiterate- I hate plastic. I guess those who have never known anything else have less of a negative reaction to it.

Thistlewaite, the curmudgeon.

But just for the record, I never said gluing plumbing parts to plastic guns WAS Steampunk, just that it was fun. Cheers.

I wish lots of things in my house were made of metal. Plastic is so boring.
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