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Author Topic: Deer hide / fur  (Read 1741 times)
Winny
Gunner
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


« on: February 14, 2010, 08:57:56 pm »

After eating said deer or freezing it, boiled its head for daughter to draw in art class I have the skin and fur left I don't know what to do with it -  dose any one have expertise in this field as I would love to be able to process it and create something out of it, I'm sure it will not be the last thing that is found and brought home.
Is there information all ready on here as I have looked but can't find any which don't mean it isn't there but  just that I haven't found it
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Theosophus Grey
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


Commanding the FAAS Widow's Son


« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2010, 09:26:34 pm »

You can tan it with or without the hair on using a home kit from Tandy Leather or similar supplier, then turn it into Pioneer-era goodies like a possibles bag, great for black-powder hunting.

http://www.tandyleatherfactory.com/home/home.aspx

Have fun!  Smiley
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malgrimace
Officer
***
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #2 on: February 14, 2010, 09:32:45 pm »

Tanning leather is one of the smelliest endeavers you can undertake, next to making your own black powder. Make sure you have somewhere nice and ventilated Smiley
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Winny
Gunner
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2010, 01:14:02 am »

I have out door space, garage, workshop and a wood store, gutting it was quite bad but I didn't expect it to be a pleasant job, I like working with leather I've just never had this opportunity in a long while, I have googled all sorts of combinations of words to get information to night and am finding that keeping the fur on is covered by very few, I will keep going, some of meet is hanging still and it is no getting far above zero at the moment, animals cant get at it including my own cats, dogs are well away from it to, coal man got a bit of a fright as it wasn't what he was expecting  Cheesy but he was OK about it.
My warmest gloves are rabbit fur and quite old so there are many reasons to learn these skills, best gloves I've ever owned,15 winters old and wonderful but looking scruffy, tried all sorts of new tech fabrics and well some times, the best way is an old way but I'll understand if some people don't like my gloves, I eat rabbit and don't see a problem with using the whole animal, in fact I would rather not waste anything
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sallyinwales
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Wales Wales



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« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2011, 10:32:59 pm »

At the risk of posting to an old topic- if its of any use to anyone in future heres a link to an article I wrote about Alum tawing deer skins or other hides. Its definately the simplest, most smell and ick free method I've found so far (and we've tried some right smelly methods as well over the years), this works great, is simple, and needs no special equipment.
http://www.downsizer.net/Projects/A_sustainable_home/Alum_Tawed_Hides_and_Skins_in_Ten_Easy_Steps/
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trampledbygeese
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Canada Canada

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« Reply #5 on: June 25, 2012, 06:01:50 am »

At the risk of posting to an old topic- if its of any use to anyone in future heres a link to an article I wrote about Alum tawing deer skins or other hides. Its definately the simplest, most smell and ick free method I've found so far (and we've tried some right smelly methods as well over the years), this works great, is simple, and needs no special equipment.
http://www.downsizer.net/Projects/A_sustainable_home/Alum_Tawed_Hides_and_Skins_in_Ten_Easy_Steps/


Also guilty of resurrecting an old thread...

Thanks for posting that recipe.  It looks like a much easier version of one tried with rabbet pelts a few years back.

The neighbour is bringing me a moose hide in a few weeks, and I'm eager to be ready for it. 

The thing is, I don't want any hair left on my leather after it's tanned.  Is there any way to add a dehairing step to this recipe?
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Narsil
Immortal
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



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« Reply #6 on: June 29, 2012, 10:35:13 pm »

Many traditional processes use a lye (a strong alkali [sodium hydroxide] derived from wood ash) solution to remove fur, fat and other tissue from hides. After soaking the hides are stretched on a frame and scraped to remove the residue.

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madron
Snr. Officer
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #7 on: June 30, 2012, 03:24:36 pm »

there is a softback book called  plains indian and mountain man arts and crafts an illustrated guide by charles w overstreet  isbn number 0-943604-41-9 which has a good section on tanning hides with or without fur on
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grimnir
Zeppelin Captain
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Australia Australia


Maker of fine Leathercrafts


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« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2012, 01:36:52 pm »

Have a look for the book ' Deerskins into buckskins' it's really good, shows the way to make good buckskins using brains, eggs or soap.
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Kindest regards, Raven

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