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Author Topic: Removing powder coating from a pc case...  (Read 4483 times)
jringling
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« on: February 03, 2010, 09:21:53 pm »

I have a small project I am working on that requires bare steel sheet metal. Being cheap, I have salvaged the case from a dead Dell computer. My question is: How do I remove the black powder coat(?) from the steel without heating it? I just picked it up today and haven't tried anything yet, but I figured  someone here may have a trick to share before I go through the (sanding/solvents/acids/wirewheel/whatever else) task of figuring it out...
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Mr. Boltneck
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« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2010, 09:45:21 pm »

I can't vouch for the stuff, not ever having used it, but these folks claim that their product removes both powder coat and paint finishes, and is reasonably safe: http://www.eastwood.com/ew-powdercoat-and-paint-dissolver-quart.html
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JingleJoe
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« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2010, 09:55:31 pm »

Tried regular paint stripper? I have had great success with Nitromors, you can get different kinds for wood and metal I think.
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phang
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« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2010, 10:37:22 pm »

As a general rule, you don't.

Powdercoat is about 1/3 of what I deal with on a daily basis. It is designed and formulated to be very durable and will shrug off most solvents, cleaners, and other corrosives. Your best open would be abrasive cleaning (ie sanding, grinding, or sand blasting)
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Reckless Engineer
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« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2010, 01:56:59 am »

Nitromors wont touch powdercoat. Gasket remover is the best way. i dont know what its called in the us but ill post a link in a mo to the stuff i use Wink
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Reckless Engineer
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« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2010, 02:03:02 am »

Found a seller in the us selling the same product i use.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Permatex-Gasket-Remover-Amazing-Value_W0QQcmdZViewItemQQhashZitem27adeebb24QQitemZ170421828388QQptZLHQ5fDefaultDomainQ5f100
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jringling
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« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2010, 02:31:57 am »

Since I wanted to try a test this evening, I tried the wirewheel... takes too long.  100 grit wet sandpaper worked great...
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Zwack
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« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2010, 03:03:35 am »

Anyone tried cheap oven cleaner as a paint stripper?  It does really well.  I haven't tried it on powdercoat though.

Z.
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Reckless Engineer
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« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2010, 12:37:03 pm »

Ovenpride over here in the uk is a fantastic remover for anodising!!!! Its about the only time i go near oven cleaner Roll Eyes
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pixlaw
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« Reply #9 on: February 10, 2010, 02:50:16 am »

My vote is for sandblasting.  There's a local machine shop which sometimes does it for me on a more-or-less free basis, as long as I beg nicely.  and you get a nice consistent tone and texture to the metal.
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Captain Quinlin Hopkins
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« Reply #10 on: February 10, 2010, 04:05:59 am »

sandblasting is of course a great option, especially if there is a nearby beach.  barring that:

aircraft paint remover is fairly inexpensive, and as it is a gel like substance, stays on the paint much longer that a low viscosity liquid, requiring less in the long run to completely strip metals.

Last thing I stripped was a 80 year old trip hammer.  Probably had 30 coats of industrial paint on it.  Scary how well this stuff works.  Need I say do not get it on your personage?
« Last Edit: February 10, 2010, 04:09:40 am by Captain Quinlin Hopkins » Logged

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« Reply #11 on: April 01, 2013, 12:57:24 am »

My vote is for sandblasting.  There's a local machine shop which sometimes does it for me on a more-or-less free basis, as long as I beg nicely.  and you get a nice consistent tone and texture to the metal.

Yes, I'd go with sandblasting, too.  Nitromors, and other paint strippers are horrible stuff, a pig to use (you end up with caustic, crusty, half-dissolved gunk, everywhere), wholly unpleasant, far more time consuming than they tell you on the tin, and never do as good a job as they claim to.  I once tried to remove gloss paint (far less tough than powdercoat) from an old, cast iron, Victorian fire surround that I was installing in my house; it took two large tins of Extra Strong Nitromors, several wrecked wire brushes, and three days before, seeing that it was still covered in horrible cack, I decided to get it sandblasted.  Less than 24 hours later, I picked it up, and it looked like it had just come from the foundry.  Even if you can't get it done for free, they only charge you by the size and complexity of the job, and, even then, it's not really that expensive.
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IGetPwnedOften
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« Reply #12 on: April 01, 2013, 01:07:51 am »

My vote is for sandblasting.  There's a local machine shop which sometimes does it for me on a more-or-less free basis, as long as I beg nicely.  and you get a nice consistent tone and texture to the metal.

Yes, I'd go with sandblasting, too.  Nitromors, and other paint strippers are horrible stuff, a pig to use (you end up with caustic, crusty, half-dissolved gunk, everywhere), wholly unpleasant, far more time consuming than they tell you on the tin, and never do as good a job as they claim to.  I once tried to remove gloss paint (far less tough than powdercoat) from an old, cast iron, Victorian fire surround that I was installing in my house; it took two large tins of Extra Strong Nitromors, several wrecked wire brushes, and three days before, seeing that it was still covered in horrible cack, I decided to get it sandblasted.  Less than 24 hours later, I picked it up, and it looked like it had just come from the foundry.  Even if you can't get it done for free, they only charge you by the size and complexity of the job, and, even then, it's not really that expensive.

Yup, third vote for sandblasting - I used to have a blasting cabinet years ago and dealt with all kinds of stuff, and I had a regular customer who refurbished PCs and related items and he became one of my best customers because it saved him hours of work. There are companies that specialise in refurbishing alloy wheels; you might try to find one of those if you can't find an engineering firm nearby.
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Ponyboy
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« Reply #13 on: April 29, 2013, 04:15:41 pm »

I wonder if it's taken him over 3 years to remove it... It must have been pretty thick. Wink
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« Reply #14 on: April 29, 2013, 04:46:30 pm »

My vote is for sandblasting. 

There sir, is a quote that should be used as a conversation stopper in many different genres of physical endeavor.
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bicyclebuilder
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« Reply #15 on: April 30, 2013, 06:35:23 am »

Is there a poll? Where do I vote?  Cheesy
Sandblasting. Powder coating is not a paint. It's baked on like enamel and can not be treated as regular paint.
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