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Author Topic: Should I use real Brass or sprayed Tin?  (Read 1636 times)
Dr. Fail
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« on: January 20, 2010, 03:27:54 pm »

Hello I'm new in this Forum and I have got a question. It could be, that this mistake exists only in english to german translating, because in german there are two metal they could translated with the word "brass". Please clear me up Smiley
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« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2010, 03:46:25 pm »


Brass is an alloy of copper and zinc, there are various different types for different purposes with extra alloying elements in varying proportions.

It's closely related to bronze which is largely composed of copper and tin and different naming conventions may have some overlap between the two.

Brass is largely valued for its good machining properties and decent resistance to corrosion. It's quite a versatile material and can be machined, pressed, formed  and cast relatively easily.

The best material for a given job really depends on what you want to achieve. Tin is rarely used in its pure form, except as a coating, tin alloys are commonly used to create low temperature castings with a good level of detail but limited mechanical strength eg minature model parts.
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« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2010, 07:18:06 pm »

Real brass of course!
Sprayed tin suggests that you have spray painted tin.
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Dr. Fail
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« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2010, 09:02:04 pm »

I have got another question: Is Brass very expensive and where can I get it? (sorry for these beginner questions, but I just had worked with other materials like wood or electric tinkerings, not with special metals.)
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Reckless Engineer
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« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2010, 09:12:39 pm »

Cronwall model boats in the uk is not bad but i find the best place for varity is ebay! What you looking for sheet,bar stock,hollows wire??? Will help with recomendations. Its not that expensive really It costs me £50 for a 2inch diameter by 12inch long bar. Sheet is avalible for a few Pounds.
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Pnakotus
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« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2010, 09:57:12 pm »

Another vote for real brass, although if "sprayed tin" means "bronze" then I'm fond of bronze too. Smiley
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brass sheet,bar stock,hollows wire?
I don't know how it is in Germany, but I've had good luck finding these on Amazon.com for decent pricees.
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Dr. Fail
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« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2010, 10:28:14 pm »

In German there are the words: Blech and Messing (maybe you can translate it by Google translate, sometimes it works pretty well) and these two words mean both "Brass" in English, and that's really confusing. But anyway, I would like to build a Steampunk monitor with keyboard and a box, where I can place my notebook to connect it to the Steampunk engines, is that possible for a beginner? Which Tools do I need? How much does the material cost (ca.)? Maybe someone can answer these hill of questions Wink

Greetings from boring Germany, Dr. Fail
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Pnakotus
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« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2010, 11:24:43 pm »

In German there are the words: Blech and Messing (maybe you can translate it by Google translate, sometimes it works pretty well) and these two words mean both "Brass" in English, and that's really confusing.
No, unfortunately google translation didn't help clear that up for me. Where is El Shoggotho when we need him?
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malgrimace
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« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2010, 11:36:49 pm »

If you're looking for brass, in Germany, might I suggest http://www.modulor.de/shop/
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« Reply #9 on: January 21, 2010, 02:17:21 am »

Do you know what colour these two different metals are?

Nickle silver is another alloy similar to brass has a white silverish colour made from Copper, Zinc and Nickel and (in England) is sometimes called "German Silver"

this cataloge in both German and English refers to Messing in German and Brass in English

http://www.conseroinc.com/pdfs/jacob/pgnpt_brass_glands.pdf

where as blech seems to come up as sheet metal

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Blech


I don't know if the two words are referring to blocks of brass and sheets of brass.

I have no understanding of German by the way.
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Dr. Fail
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« Reply #10 on: January 21, 2010, 02:44:37 pm »

Do you know what colour these two different metals are?

Nickle silver is another alloy similar to brass has a white silverish colour made from Copper, Zinc and Nickel and (in England) is sometimes called "German Silver"

this cataloge in both German and English refers to Messing in German and Brass in English

http://www.conseroinc.com/pdfs/jacob/pgnpt_brass_glands.pdf

where as blech seems to come up as sheet metal

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Blech


I don't know if the two words are referring to blocks of brass and sheets of brass.

I have no understanding of German by the way.

puh, now I looked the word "Blech" up in a dictionary and found out, that it's just another word for every not so rare Metal Wink So Brass means just "Messing" and then it's the same. Anyway, german sucks, I would like to speak a better English that I maybe can live a time in England or so. But back to Steampunk: At the German site www.modulor.de I found pretty cheap brass. But if I want to implement my plan, I even need typewriter keys, too.
Did I told my still notionally project?
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twilightbanana
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« Reply #11 on: January 22, 2010, 10:06:52 am »

According to wikipedia, 'Blech' means sheet metal, such as the type used to make 'tin' cans and the like (so not actually tin). 'Messing' is indeed brass. Bronze is also called bronze in German.

Did I told my still notionally project?

I'm not sure what you're trying to ask here. Could you change the wording to your question?
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Dr. Fail
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« Reply #12 on: January 22, 2010, 02:02:16 pm »

I'm playing with the thought to build a steampunk monitor with keyboard, a steampunk box for my laptop and a USB Hub for all these things to connect it to the laptop. I think it's a really hard beginner project, but I think I can do that. But where can I get typewriter keys for low budget? How much does it costs about?

greetz, Leon
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3Dsniper
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« Reply #13 on: February 05, 2010, 09:50:26 pm »

In German there are the words: Blech and Messing

I know that the dutch word for brass is Messing, and for copper we use koper and bronze brons. tin is still tin (unless its in the sense of a tin can, then its called blik) and lead would be lood.

Don't know if this helps you with the german translations, but I think this should cover the most popular metals used.. (I do use lead, but only for soldering ICs as lead free soldering alloys may need temperatures too high for the IC)
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Dr. Fail
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« Reply #14 on: February 07, 2010, 01:45:37 pm »

where can I get typewriter keys for low budget? How much does it costs about?

greetz, Leon

can me someone answer this question, please?
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Narsil
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« Reply #15 on: February 07, 2010, 02:10:04 pm »

There are several options

-find a defunct typewriter and remove the keys
-find someone who sells original or reproduction keys eg on ebay
-make your own from scratch
-modify something form another source eg shirt buttons.

The 'best' option depends on exactly what you want to achieve, what the donor keyboard is like and how you modify it and how much time, money tools and skill you have.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2010, 02:12:22 pm by Narsil » Logged
Dr. Fail
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« Reply #16 on: February 07, 2010, 02:12:18 pm »

can you explain me the thirt option?

thank you for your fast request
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Narsil
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« Reply #17 on: February 07, 2010, 02:19:52 pm »


If you want to make your own you have quite a few options

-you could find some component which is similar to a typewriter key and modify it
-you could fabricate keys from scratch from metal or plastic stock tube, bar sheet etc
-you could sculpt a key and cast it in resin or metal

again the 'best' option depends on what you want to achieve and what resources you have available.
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Otto Von Pifka
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« Reply #18 on: February 07, 2010, 02:54:11 pm »

this thread is about making keys for yourself. keys as in typewriter buttons

http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,10435.0.html

it's looking like they are making very good forgeries.

for the brass, you can buy decorative brass corner pieces that are used for picture frames and to bolster boxes and trunks. they can be added to dress up poorly cut corners, and to make it look more period.

you might want to practice on covering a small box or container with brass, to get an idea what works and what doesn't. very thin brass you can cut with sissors but it will be damaged easily even after gluing it down. thicker brass will be sturdier but much harder to cut up and bend to shape.

puting the laptop in a case is tricky, you have to make sure it gets enough cooling air to run good. add a picture frame to the monitor, easier than trying to clad it in brass.
a usb hub can be hidden in a fake book or small store bought box, even a jewelry box. an unpowered hub might run fine in an enclosed space but a powered hub might overheat.
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Dr. Fail
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« Reply #19 on: February 07, 2010, 04:15:20 pm »

thank you for the link. I founded out, that i can just realise the project in fall or winter, because i buy me some more important stuff for my drumset or electro projects....bad, but it is so....

Thank you for all answers and if you want to write more informations, do that I will collect them and apply them in the "computer goes steampunk" project Smiley
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