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Author Topic: watches help needed - i got an early present  (Read 1392 times)
Prof. Sine Weevil
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« on: December 23, 2009, 10:36:15 pm »

hi all

i'm a long time lurker small time poster

recently i have been given by an elderly relative 3 silver pocket watches (im more concerned with, the history they were my great grandads) (im actualy not that fond of most precious metals, i think there too showy
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
)

however i'm new to horology and need some help

first can anyone identify them? age? a bit of history? anything you can tell me!
second how much do good quality watch repairs cost? vague question i know but one is missing a glass and the other may need repair.
third does any one know a good uk watch repairer? any tips on choosing one?...these are family treasures i'd rather save for ages and have a pukka job than hand it to someone who might bodge it!

i'm afraid i'm limited on time so hear is one please, excuse photo the light was fading and i couldent find the tripod more photos and watch's will follow later..
number one
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Cheers guys

Prof. Sine
 
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"red to red and black to black, throw the switch and stand well back!"
Zwack
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United States United States

And introducing the wonderful Irish (Mrs Z).


« Reply #1 on: December 24, 2009, 02:32:57 am »

The photo didn't show up for me...

However good clear photos will certainly help date and guess the origin of the watches.

Yes, there is the watch equivalent of a service.  It's a clean and lube.  They dismantle the watch, checking all the parts for issues, clean them all and then put them back together with the right quantity and type of oils.

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Prof. Sine Weevil
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #2 on: December 24, 2009, 02:44:19 pm »

Sorry about that, I fear I have probably fallen prey to photobucket problems.

Try this link:
http://s845.photobucket.com/albums/ab17/profsine/watches/
these are all Photos of the watch in question

The photo didn't show up for me...

However good clear photos will certainly help date and guess the origin of the watches.

Yes, there is the watch equivalent of a service.  It's a clean and lube.  They dismantle the watch, checking all the parts for issues, clean them all and then put them back together with the right quantity and type of oils.




Ahh, ok, so they are all going to want a clean and lube then ( i think the last 30 odd years in a draw probabley wont have done the oil any favors.

As i say better photos to follow i hope (if only i could find that tripod...i have suspicions it has decided to elope with the mah-jong set as neither can be found, most annoying Angry ).
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Rowan of Rin
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Australia Australia

~The Black Blood Alchemist~


« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2010, 05:53:07 am »

Photos showed up fine for me. What you have is a very nice fusee pocket watch. The case seems in good condition apart from the missing crystal (the correct term for the glass), which will be a cheap and easy fix. It never had a 'door' (I think you mean a cover over the dial), as this is an open face pocket watch, as oppose to a hunter-case watch, which do have covers (the earlier watches were almost always open face).

Do you have a key for the watch? If not, it will be hard to tell if it is going. Also, if you can get off the gold dust case on the movement, then we can better ascertain what condition the movement is in (fusee watches are tricky, if the chain is gone, or broken it can be quite tricky to fix). If you gently rock the watch back and forth (as in, clockwise then anti-clockwise), and put your ear up to it, does it tick for a second or so?

I can also attest to the frequency to which a mah-jong set will disappear..
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Prof. Sine Weevil
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2010, 11:51:31 pm »

Sorry for the late reply have been back at university and busy with exams.

Its fusee! excellent thanks for that, mmm hope the chains still intact.

By door i meant the part of the case that the crystal fits into and opens to allow access to the face and hands i think it might have been bent as it dose not shut fully at the bottom.

Alas i don't have a key for any of the watch's and they are all key wind too, don't suppose keys were standardized by this time?

I'm at university at the moment and don't have my watches with me (doubt my insurance would cover them) so i can't test wether they tick when moved.

As for removing the dust cover how do i go about it?

From:
http://s845.photobucket.com/albums/ab17/profsine/watches/?action=view&current=P1010059.jpg

I take it I unhook the black spring from the two pips on  back of the case and then lift the dust cover off  (I have an image of undoing that spring and the whole thing exploding in a cloud of gears and springs). I take it that so long as I do it in on clean surface i should be ok, they are not that sensitive to dust are they?

Thanks for all the help guys I appreciate it.

Prof. Sine
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Darkhound
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United States United States


« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2010, 03:35:35 am »

I can answer all three points raised in your post of the 19th,  Prof. Weevil.

First, a minor dent keeping the case from closing completely is not uncommon and a competent jeweler should by able to fix it. Bending it back yourself is not recommended, the hinges are delicate and I doubt you have the right tools anyway. They'll throw straightening the bezel (the  frame holding the crystal) and aligning the hinges in with replacing the crystal, as a rule.

Second, watch keys do indeed come in standard sizes and are relatively cheap over the internet. One supplier I found even makes two star shaped multi-keys, one with all the odd numbered sizes and one with all the even. Mind you  don't get clock keys, which also come in numbered standard sizes, but are much bigger.

For the dust cover, you see the round hole in the retaining spring  near one of the posts? Slide the spring in its groove until the hole lines up with the post. The notch at the other end of the spring will clear its post. Lift the dust cover straight up to remove it. Obviously, this should be done in a clean environment, but doesn't require a physics lab clean room or anything. Unless the watch is very broken indeed, everything will still be firmly screwed down at this point. Messing with the screws is a Bad Plan if you want the watch to run again, unless you are or are under the supervision of a watchmaker.

If it really is a fusee type, the fusee is the conical bit. The chain will look like a piece of sewing thread wrapped around it. If you see it great, if not, I'm afraid fusee chain repair is very nearly a lost art. Good luck!
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Prof. Sine Weevil
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2010, 11:15:09 am »

Excellent

I shall buy a set of watch keys  (probably an ebay job) and have a peer beneath the dust dust cover when i'm next home

Thanks for all the help, don't suppose anyones got any hints on finding a good watchmaker?

Thanks

Prof. Sine
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