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Author Topic: Bending metal tubes  (Read 3822 times)
architect
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« Reply #25 on: September 24, 2010, 06:21:05 pm »

when hammering you should use something with only a slight sanded surface for smaller projects. then when nearly done use a hammer that has been polished and buffed even.

if you have a hammer that is polished on the head to a mirror finish, the item being hit will have a mirror finish where you hit it instead of being roughed up.

if you use this one thing you MUST be sure of is to clean everything each time you go to use the items. (anvil, metal being worked, and hammer head) or any dirt on them will mar both your piece and the hammer or anvil and then you end up with marring every time you use them until you polish off the marred surface.

if you have ever seen a coin from the mint that is meant for collecting you will notice some parts of the coin are polished up to a mirror. they do not do this with each coin but instead the die they smash the coin blank with to make said coins head and tail are polished up and there for every coin is already mirror finished up. With this in mind if you make a pattern on your hammer you can replicate this in negative on the metal too. or do this on your anvil. what ever is you choice.
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sidecar_jon
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« Reply #26 on: September 24, 2010, 09:57:50 pm »

Yep i sometimes use polished hammers to beat bowls. usually i aim for a more worked appearance but when i need that extra contrast in polish i wire wool the hammer head and use a buffer on it. A more professional bowl maker has dozens of mirror polished hammers and a silvery anvil, mine unfortunately seem to go rusty over night!
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architect
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« Reply #27 on: September 25, 2010, 05:27:23 pm »

it is true that a steel hammer that is clean and polished that level will rust literally in an hour or less and the longer left like that the deeper it will get. so you have to either be certain it is completely dry or put a coating of some sort of oil on it. over night a week I just use 3 in 1 but if it is going into storage then red lithium is what I use most of the time. same stuff steel tooling that is going to be shipped over seas by boat is coated with so it must be pretty good and cheap.
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sidecar_jon
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« Reply #28 on: September 27, 2010, 01:32:11 pm »

Im awaiting some Pewter circles (12") so i really must get to polishing my hammers!...and i must make a paper hammer (not as daft as it sounds!)
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Miles (a sailor)Martin
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« Reply #29 on: September 27, 2010, 02:22:38 pm »


                  this works for soft copper  soft brass and aluminun.
                  I have not tryed it on stainless or steel tubing yet.
                   old timers trick, cicia 1890 or so
 i learned from my grandfather, is to plug one end of the tube, fill with water then stand it on end in the freezer overnite, remove in morning while wearing gloves then bend to shape quckly ,remove plug place in sink and let ice melt out.
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Who you calling old, Sonny boy? Just because my birth certificate is on birch bark there isn't any reason to be calling names.
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