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Author Topic: Incredible Steampunk Vehicles Thread  (Read 129142 times)
Vagabond GentleMan
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« Reply #25 on: December 15, 2009, 12:01:40 am »


This is one of those "What the future (today) did right" type of Steampunk-vehicles.

I believe this is called the "Gossamer Albatross", though sometimes seems to be called the "Gossamer Condor", and it is a Human-Powered-Aircraft.... i.e. Bicycle plane.

Yes, if I understand right, you pedal it, and it flies.
It was flown across the English channel in 1980?

Like, what cool!
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« Reply #26 on: December 15, 2009, 12:31:18 am »

Yeah that was cool, it was all over the telly at the time, it required a super fit pro-cyclist to power it though and the effort nearly killed him i seem to remember.
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« Reply #27 on: December 15, 2009, 02:30:52 am »

Psht!  If I could just fly it two blocks to the 7-11 and back, I'd die happy!

BICYCLE PLANE!
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Mr. Boltneck
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« Reply #28 on: December 15, 2009, 02:35:22 am »

The Gossamer Condor was the earlier version, which won a long-standing challenge. Those were amazing machines. Several months ago there was video going around of some guy in the Netherlands who was building a human-powered airplane.
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H. MacHinery
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« Reply #29 on: December 15, 2009, 03:00:16 am »

The Gossamer Condor was the earlier version, which won a long-standing challenge. Those were amazing machines. Several months ago there was video going around of some guy in the Netherlands who was building a human-powered airplane.

The Condor won the initial Kremer prize, and the Albatross crossed the Channel under human power, winning the second Kremer prize.
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akumabito
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« Reply #30 on: December 15, 2009, 05:06:29 pm »

Now who's gonna be the first to cross the Atlantic Ocean in a cycleplane? Grin
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Acheron
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« Reply #31 on: December 16, 2009, 12:47:04 am »

Krugger Motorcycles make some of the most fantastic classic designs, and since I believe we all love most motorcycles for their mechanical looks in the first place...


The Krugger 'Half Day', one example of what I believe should be called 'Mech Deco'...


Then there's the more steam/dieselpunk-ish 'Zeroesque' by Krazy Horse Cycles...


...and the Eckerslike Flyer, also by the latter.
« Last Edit: December 16, 2009, 12:52:36 am by Acheron » Logged

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« Reply #32 on: December 16, 2009, 01:35:49 am »

Hmmm, that Lefrance has got me thinking about me next vehicular project, i ahve always planned to build a rod, but i'm not interested in the shiny shiny show rod scene, or the fake "rat rod" scene either, now that thing however has budget potential.

I'm thinking about maybe an old leafsprung Landrover chassis (using an original unmodified chassis allows you to avoid BIVA testing in the UK as the vehicle becomes rebodied rather than a home built car) with a Sherpa van Beam axle in place of the front live axle and a straight 6 from something like a Jaguar, home built bodywork should be fairly simple for that style, although it would need mudguards to be road legal here.

If it was all put togther from parts that had not been cleaned up to much it could develop its own patina and being vaguely truck like would not hurt it.

I wonder if i can swop my old Range Rover for an old Landrover? I shall give this some serious thought i think.


I'm not sure what the used car market in the UK is like, but if you want something to get a solid, barebones chassis with solid axels and a good engine, your best bets are either a Jeep Wrangler with the 4.2L or 4.0L I6 engine or a Land Rover Defender with the 200TDI or 300TDI engine. Rock solid and approximately as complicated as two sticks and a rock. Really, for a off-the-shelf steampunk vehicle, a Wrangler or Defender are the best you can get-maybe not the perfect look, but they've certainly got the adventurism and creation aspects down solid!

Archeron, if you like those, check out the Ural Patrol or the Triumph Thruxton-vintage looks and modern* technology, the best kind!

*I use the term 'modern' very loosely for the Ural, but it's still newer then the rest of the bike, which would blend in perfectly invading Poland.
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popuptoaster
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« Reply #33 on: December 16, 2009, 10:35:29 am »

I know all about LR's i still own a Range Rover classic along with my Jag and Mazda 4x4 pickup truck. Cheesy I've been taking cars apart for over 25 years, things are changing here now though as the laws that have been around for most of that time are actually being enforced now, so its got more complicated to modify things.

in basic terms if you use an unmodified chassis from and existing vehicle your vehicle only needs and inspection to confirm its identity and for you to decide on e new (untrademarked) name for it, if you modify or build your own chassis (or monocoque) this puts you into a whole world of complication as you then have to get the car through BIVA, a lot of it is safety based and is common sense and worth doing anyway, but there are complications, such as crash saftey, which require you to have a minimum radius bend on all edges and corners, this makes it very difficicult to get anything through the test with exposed windscreen wipers or old style chrome bumpers for example.

So chassis chioce is now quite imprtant, landy chassis are easy to get, but come with tall wobbly suspension on the new ones, or over stiff hard leaf springs on the old ones, and as you lose "identity" points for everything you alter you can find yourself in BIVA territory very easily.
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Pog
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« Reply #34 on: December 16, 2009, 12:00:42 pm »

Can anyone help me with something. Just a thought, it's a way of having the engine in a different position so it's still a (most likely) 4 wheeled vehicle with an engine but so it looks complete un-carlike?
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« Reply #35 on: December 16, 2009, 12:04:19 pm »

@Marauder_Pilot - later vehicles are coil sprung. No good for that vintage look. You'd want to keep the old eaf springs. Land Rover Series vehicles would be perfect. A 110 inch wheelbase model is pretty cheap, parts are widely available (most parts can be purchased brand new if so desired)

@Popuptoaster - if you'd leave the chassis and drivetrain intact, wouldn't it just be a rebody? I think it would just need to get SVA'd and you'd be good to go. This way, you'd just be subject to 1970s safety/emission laws, no?
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« Reply #36 on: December 16, 2009, 02:52:32 pm »

Can anyone help me with something. Just a thought, it's a way of having the engine in a different position so it's still a (most likely) 4 wheeled vehicle with an engine but so it looks complete un-carlike?


Its not hard to move an engine on a vehicle with a proper chassis, linkages for the gearbox so you can still reach the gearchange can get complicated though if your running a manual box, and your limited in how far backwards you can go with a front engined rwd vehicle as you need a minimum legnth for the propshaft to axle distance.

A FWD engine and box can be quite easily moved backwards to drive the rear wheels instead but most chassis are not designe to accept that type of layout.

If your in a country that allows you to build your own car from the ground up than anything is possible, cars are not that complicated at a basic level.


@Marauder_Pilot - later vehicles are coil sprung. No good for that vintage look. You'd want to keep the old eaf springs. Land Rover Series vehicles would be perfect. A 110 inch wheelbase model is pretty cheap, parts are widely available (most parts can be purchased brand new if so desired)

@Popuptoaster - if you'd leave the chassis and drivetrain intact, wouldn't it just be a rebody? I think it would just need to get SVA'd and you'd be good to go. This way, you'd just be subject to 1970s safety/emission laws, no?

yeah thats true, except SVA is now BIVA leaving the drivetrain as is is always a compromise though because if your trying to create that "old timer" look the front wheels usually need moving forwards or you end up with a foot or so of chassis sticking out the front, the engine is also place to far forwards on modern vehciles to look right.
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Dusza Beben
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« Reply #37 on: December 16, 2009, 04:45:26 pm »

Here is a video of the American LaFrance Speedster.

American Lafrance La France Speedster RacerDQ
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akumabito
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« Reply #38 on: December 16, 2009, 06:18:37 pm »

@Marauder_Pilot - later vehicles are coil sprung. No good for that vintage look. You'd want to keep the old eaf springs. Land Rover Series vehicles would be perfect. A 110 inch wheelbase model is pretty cheap, parts are widely available (most parts can be purchased brand new if so desired)

@Popuptoaster - if you'd leave the chassis and drivetrain intact, wouldn't it just be a rebody? I think it would just need to get SVA'd and you'd be good to go. This way, you'd just be subject to 1970s safety/emission laws, no?

yeah thats true, except SVA is now BIVA leaving the drivetrain as is is always a compromise though because if your trying to create that "old timer" look the front wheels usually need moving forwards or you end up with a foot or so of chassis sticking out the front, the engine is also place to far forwards on modern vehciles to look right.

Many period vehicles have quite a bit of chassis sticking out as well.. although the transverse leaf springs were quite popular, there were a large number of vehicles with their leaf-springs in the normal position, sticking out quite a bit at the front. It doesn't really look weird at all. There's this chap that made a replica of Chitty Bang based on a Land Rover - it looked ok to me.. sure, not as refined (read: fragile) as the racers of the time, but it could pass reasonably well for either a sturdier vehicle such as early military vehicles, or perhaps like the large passenger cars of old, like the old Rolls Royces or Bugattis..

Plus, you'd get to maintain 4WD, +1 for SP chic Wink
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akumabito
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« Reply #39 on: December 16, 2009, 06:21:05 pm »

Here is a video of the American LaFrance Speedster.

American Lafrance La France Speedster Racer


It even sounds like a Land Rover Grin
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popuptoaster
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« Reply #40 on: December 16, 2009, 07:14:41 pm »

I'd want a proper beam axle on the front rather than a live axle and an engine with some punch fitted and moved back so the front was behind the centre line of the front wheels, a Landy chassis would do at a pinch but they are not pretty at the front where it would all be exposed 4 wheel drive is just added weight and complication in something thats not gonna be used off road and a leaf sprung Landy will be seriously uncomfortable if you make it lighter, they were deliberately designed with hard springs (as were most off roaders back then) to slow down drivers on rough surfaces so that the vehicle was not damaged by hitting bumps to fast, tahts why the Range rover with its long travel soft suspension was such a revelation when it came along, road speed capable while off road. Cheesy
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Marauder_Pilot
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« Reply #41 on: December 16, 2009, 08:47:00 pm »

I know all about LR's i still own a Range Rover classic along with my Jag and Mazda 4x4 pickup truck. Cheesy I've been taking cars apart for over 25 years, things are changing here now though as the laws that have been around for most of that time are actually being enforced now, so its got more complicated to modify things.

in basic terms if you use an unmodified chassis from and existing vehicle your vehicle only needs and inspection to confirm its identity and for you to decide on e new (untrademarked) name for it, if you modify or build your own chassis (or monocoque) this puts you into a whole world of complication as you then have to get the car through BIVA, a lot of it is safety based and is common sense and worth doing anyway, but there are complications, such as crash saftey, which require you to have a minimum radius bend on all edges and corners, this makes it very difficicult to get anything through the test with exposed windscreen wipers or old style chrome bumpers for example.

So chassis chioce is now quite imprtant, landy chassis are easy to get, but come with tall wobbly suspension on the new ones, or over stiff hard leaf springs on the old ones, and as you lose "identity" points for everything you alter you can find yourself in BIVA territory very easily.

Well, now I feel silly.  Embarrassed

@Marauder_Pilot - later vehicles are coil sprung. No good for that vintage look. You'd want to keep the old eaf springs. Land Rover Series vehicles would be perfect. A 110 inch wheelbase model is pretty cheap, parts are widely available (most parts can be purchased brand new if so desired)

I wouldn't really consider coils to be a departure from form, especially we're talking about using an internal combustion engine for a Steampunk vehicle.  Grin But, seriously, I doubt the suspension style is such an issue-and, even if it is, I'd make the sacrifice for a bit of comfort. Granted, leaves are easier to work with.
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akumabito
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« Reply #42 on: December 16, 2009, 11:54:05 pm »

Any interest in an Open Source steampunk car design? The classic Lotus Super Seven has gone pretty much Open Source. There is a huge community of folks building those.. with a car inspired by 1920's era vehicles we'd need to start from scratch though, the Super Seven is far too modern to get the looks right..

I too like the look of beam axles out front.. transerse spring.. drum brakes if possible.. combined with some tall and skinny tires.. problem is, I wouldn't know of any suitable donor vehicles. The Sherpa van has been mentioned, but how common are those? The CycleKar people build their own, perhaps it is feasible to scale up their designs.. It doesn't look overly complicated. The cast iron or lightened axles on American hotrods look fantastic, but would be hard to duplkicate on a budget - some pipe and a bending tool could get the shape right, but you'd lose some of the cool factor.. not sure about the uprights and brakes though..

Come on folks, let's get brainstorming here.. we'll start with the front end and once that is out of the way we'll start thinking about engine and transmission options..
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akumabito
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« Reply #43 on: December 17, 2009, 01:39:59 am »

Messing around in SketchUp... straight axle, transverse leafspring and drum brakes, narrow body, single windshield, twin spare tires.. Despite its minuscule cabin width, it ain't a small vehicle though.. to get the proportions right, the wheelbase would probably be around 130 inch or so.. That's the same as an extended wheelbase Land Rover, or a Hummer H1..

Spoiler (click to show/hide)
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Vagabond GentleMan
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« Reply #44 on: December 17, 2009, 01:46:54 am »

You know what else the future (current times) did mostly right?

Subways.

Subterranean Electric Railway Systems?

Hell yeah.

They could look way cooler, though.  The idea is right, but they got the aesthetics all wrong.
Maybe someday I'll be an independently wealthy multi-billionaire and design and develop a baddass Steampunk subway train.
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Pog
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« Reply #45 on: December 17, 2009, 04:48:25 am »

Oh, sorry, I'm not building a real car  Shocked ...yet, it's for something else, plus I don't get your technological/mechanical mumbo-jumbo!
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popuptoaster
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« Reply #46 on: December 17, 2009, 11:30:57 am »

Messing around in SketchUp... straight axle, transverse leafspring and drum brakes, narrow body, single windshield, twin spare tires.. Despite its minuscule cabin width, it ain't a small vehicle though.. to get the proportions right, the wheelbase would probably be around 130 inch or so.. That's the same as an extended wheelbase Land Rover, or a Hummer H1..

Spoiler (click to show/hide)


If you want to build something steampunk thats vaguely usable on the road and still  simple you cant do much better than the model T chassis, funnily enough its design is pretty close to how a coil sprung landrover id set up underneath.



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Arceye
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« Reply #47 on: December 19, 2009, 06:04:03 pm »

I've got most of the bits to put an electric motor on this,

                         

                       
                                But a small motorbike engine would be fun.
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akumabito
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« Reply #48 on: December 19, 2009, 06:18:18 pm »

Messing around in SketchUp... straight axle, transverse leafspring and drum brakes, narrow body, single windshield, twin spare tires.. Despite its minuscule cabin width, it ain't a small vehicle though.. to get the proportions right, the wheelbase would probably be around 130 inch or so.. That's the same as an extended wheelbase Land Rover, or a Hummer H1..

Spoiler (click to show/hide)


If you want to build something steampunk thats vaguely usable on the road and still  simple you cant do much better than the model T chassis, funnily enough its design is pretty close to how a coil sprung landrover id set up underneath.






The wheels on that chassis are awesome.. look like wooden spokes???
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Vagabond GentleMan
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« Reply #49 on: December 19, 2009, 09:23:33 pm »

Well done, Arceye, well done!

Makes me with I had more mechanical aptitude...
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