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Author Topic: How to make an LED light fade in when power is applied?  (Read 23193 times)
Der Tinkermann
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« Reply #25 on: December 15, 2009, 08:28:55 pm »

edit:Well,that seems to work(did a very quick test,without bothering too much about values)

Care to take a quick video to share the results with everyone?

I don't get much chance at home to play electronics, but if we get the forum so that thinkers can come up with ideas and others post visible results then I'll be more inclined to come up with ideas/solutions.

My first degree is in Electronic Engineering and Maths, but I've never put the electronics side to much use.

I'll see if I can take one tonight ......Personally I'd like to see more of these electronics projects.
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alfa1
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« Reply #26 on: December 16, 2009, 10:22:51 am »

Personally I'd like to see more of these electronics projects.


Then you'll love the one I'm working on now.   Sensors, oscillators, power supply, summing amplifier, coils, high and low pass filters.   Still to add A to D converter, software and onboard speech synthesis.
More electronics than I've ever put into one project before.
All in a stained wood box with brass trim.  And gauges.
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Dave the Troll
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« Reply #27 on: December 16, 2009, 11:18:23 am »

Personally I'd like to see more of these electronics projects.

Then you'll love the one I'm working on now.   Sensors, oscillators, power supply, summing amplifier, coils, high and low pass filters.   Still to add A to D converter, software and onboard speech synthesis.
More electronics than I've ever put into one project before.
All in a stained wood box with brass trim.  And gauges.

I think there are two levels of project.  One is a systems level one, the other is where the component count is <10.  Yours is the former, this one is the later.

I'd be very interested in collaborating in the later.  I can even justify the work time that I spend on the forum (I'll book it to Training).  So, if this problem is solved... Next?
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aquafortis
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« Reply #28 on: December 28, 2009, 02:14:40 pm »

A simpler approach is to use a series choke to ramp the current up. Depending how quickly you want the LED to come on, it may end up being quite big. If coil winding isn't your thing, then the paralell capacitor and series resistor will work just fine.
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Dave the Troll
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« Reply #29 on: December 29, 2009, 10:53:25 am »

A simpler approach is to use a series choke to ramp the current up. Depending how quickly you want the LED to come on, it may end up being quite big. If coil winding isn't your thing, then the paralell capacitor and series resistor will work just fine.

Whether you use an inductor or a capacitor, if you are directly trying to delay the current of the LED then you need a very large value component for a very small job.  By instead controlling the base current of a capacitor (as per the earlier circuit), you only need a small component.
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AubreyDawson
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« Reply #30 on: July 24, 2013, 07:40:07 am »

Hello good sirs and ladies.  I am currently researching the requirements for a project idea I had tonight, and one of the items on my list is finding out what it would take to make an LED light fade in when the power is switched on (as opposed to coming on instantly).  Also, would this be able to make the light fade out when power is removed?  Finally, what would it take to make the light pulse slightly while the power remains on?

I failed Circuits 1 in college two years ago, and that's all the electronics I've ever been exposed to.  Ohm's law and I are good friends, but otherwise I would appreciate "Electronics for Dummies" kinds of explanations.  Thank you very much for your time.

hello man sorry to reply in old thread but were you able to fade the light? I am working on similar project so can you help me out?Waiting for reply thanks in advance:)
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Esteem Punk
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« Reply #31 on: July 24, 2013, 08:06:16 am »

I know it is the equivalent of mowing your suburban lawn with a combine harvester, but since 2009 Arduinos have gone from about $40, to about $10. A pulse width modulation signal to an LED to make it fade on and off is with an Arduino is incredibly simple to do, even for the electronically challenged.
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AubreyDawson
Swab

United States United States


« Reply #32 on: July 24, 2013, 05:28:05 pm »

Hello good sirs and ladies.  I am currently researching the requirements for a project idea I had tonight, and one of the items on my list is finding out what it would take to make an led lighting fade in when the power is switched on (as opposed to coming on instantly).  Also, would this be able to make the light fade out when power is removed?  Finally, what would it take to make the light pulse slightly while the power remains on?

I failed Circuits 1 in college two years ago, and that's all the electronics I've ever been exposed to.  Ohm's law and I are good friends, but otherwise I would appreciate "Electronics for Dummies" kinds of explanations.  Thank you very much for your time.



hello man sorry to reply in old thread but were you able to fade the light? I am working on similar project so can you help me out?Waiting for reply thanks in advance:)


Ok thanks for reply
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von Corax
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« Reply #33 on: July 24, 2013, 09:38:25 pm »

I know it is the equivalent of mowing your suburban lawn with a combine harvester, but since 2009 Arduinos have gone from about $40, to about $10. A pulse width modulation signal to an LED to make it fade on and off is with an Arduino is incredibly simple to do, even for the electronically challenged.

If you use the Arduino Nano it's only like mowing your lawn with a Brush Hog (and I've seen lawns where that might not be overkill.)

As for the fading/pulsating trick, it might even be in one of the code samples that come with the Arduino software.
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oldskoolpunk
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« Reply #34 on: July 25, 2013, 05:11:45 am »

There are now "LED candles", with a circuit to make them flicker convincingly. There are even ones with wireless remote control.
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