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Author Topic: Steampunk render on an image  (Read 3354 times)
Mr Pad
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« on: February 28, 2007, 10:20:01 pm »

I was just wondering what effect on photoshop / the gimp you would recommand to make a photo look vintage in a steampunk way...

I like this kind of effect which remind me of Brazil, but it's not very steampunk... :


I'm sure it can be far better, but I have no idea on how to "steampunkify" an image.

[Edit : making my text clearer Wink]
« Last Edit: February 28, 2007, 10:49:03 pm by Mr Pad » Logged
ClockworkDragonfly
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« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2007, 10:33:02 pm »

There are a ton of filters out there for Photoshop that will add the scan lines like that for you. Here's a couple from a quick search.
http://photoshop.pluginsworld.com/plugin.php?directory=adobe&software=photoshop&plugin=178
http://blog.procontentanddesign.com/articles/single/82.htm

There are other ways to do it using the built in halftone filter, here's a tutorial link
http://www.cbtcafe.com/photoshop/tvLines/tvlines.html

I was watching the History Channel's Modern Marvels the other day and they were having a special on "failed" inventions, one of which was the mechanical television. The first one fit the style and the time frame to be rather steampunk.
It was a red monochrome image shown through a magnifier. The images it rendered were less distinct and they had broader scan lines that were arranged vertically rather than horizontally.
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Mr Pad
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« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2007, 10:42:04 pm »

Thanks for your answer and the links. Smiley

But it occurs to me I may have been not enough precise : I am not looking especially for the liney effect (which I know how to do Wink) but for any kind of effects which could possibly "steampunkify" an image.

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« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2007, 11:31:24 pm »

Mechanical television wasn't a failure, it was a precursor to modern television. The same principles that they used in the mechanically scanned units where carried over to the cathode ray tubes. They got away from the mechanics because it was too slow to make a large image.


As for steampunkification of an image, try softening the focus and adding a sepia tone with some film grain? I don't know how to do that in Photoshop but I'm sure its not hard to locate with Google.
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Copper Sulphate
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« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2007, 11:46:01 pm »

Mechanical television wasn't a failure, it was a precursor to modern television. The same principles that they used in the mechanically scanned units where carried over to the cathode ray tubes. They got away from the mechanics because it was too slow to make a large image.

Yup.  Smiley

As for steampunkification of an image, try softening the focus and adding a sepia tone with some film grain? I don't know how to do that in Photoshop but I'm sure its not hard to locate with Google.

I would be interested in hearing if anyone succeeds in making believeable film grain in either Photoshop or The GIMP. Have been trying to do so on several occasions with not entirely convincing results, but maybe I just have to keep at it.

Also playing with the contrast and dynamic range ('Levels') may be of use. Many among the early photographers really knew how to squeeze the maximum results from the materials available to them and that to a degree, where many modern photos turned B/W look quite poor by comparison.
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« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2007, 12:09:04 am »

Simply create a new layer over the image, fill it with a sepia tone, then set the layer to "multiply".

Then you can go back to the base layer and adjust your saturation, contrast, brightness, etc.

Very simple process.
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« Reply #6 on: March 01, 2007, 12:12:23 am »



In an old post here I briefly mentioned how to get the effect, it is almost exactly as Mr Vernian Process just suggested as I was writing this.  *chuckles*
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ClockworkDragonfly
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« Reply #7 on: March 01, 2007, 12:32:13 am »

Mechanical television wasn't a failure, it was a precursor to modern television. The same principles that they used in the mechanically scanned units where carried over to the cathode ray tubes. They got away from the mechanics because it was too slow to make a large image.

I think the idea behind the Hist. Channel calling them failed inventions is that, despite their use as stepping stones for future ideas and their technological success, they were never truly commercially successful.

They showed the color version at the end of that segment and the picture was bloody amazing.
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« Reply #8 on: March 01, 2007, 12:48:00 am »

Thanks for your answer and the links. Smiley

But it occurs to me I may have been not enough precise : I am not looking especially for the liney effect (which I know how to do Wink) but for any kind of effects which could possibly "steampunkify" an image.



The sepia effects which have already been mentioned are a great way. This will keep your image recognizably photographic.
Another route you might take would be to make it appear to be an etching or engraving. There are a number of ways to go about this. Play around with some various filters.
Some hints:
heighten the contrast somewhat
posterize it
then try the mezzotint filter
(sorry I don't have photoshop on this machine, so I can't check for anymore specifics, at the moment.)
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« Reply #9 on: March 01, 2007, 03:11:37 pm »

Here's another GIMP trick:

* Right Click on the image
* Script-Fu
* Decor
* Old Photo. There is a 'Sepia' checkbox on the dialog you get.

* Right-Click on the image again.
* Artistic
* Soft-Glow

The result, as applied on a quick render I did a while ago, looks like this:

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« Reply #10 on: March 02, 2007, 04:59:28 pm »

I just pull out the ol callotype camera and do a wet plate. Then scan it into the 'puter...
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