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Author Topic: Problem with Elgin  (Read 1590 times)
Captain Lyerly
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« on: October 01, 2009, 02:14:29 am »

Stemwind, probably 1910-1920.  The problem is that the second hand no longer clears the other hands; it will run for a while, then stop when it wants to.

I have opened the case, prepared to do battle; then quailed at the daunting task.  Those hands are tiny!  Is there a safe fix, or should I trust a local battery-changer/watchstrap fixer?

It is a family piece, so I don't want to risk damage to it.


Cheers!

Chas.
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Captain Sir Charles A. Lyerly, O.B.T.
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wire: captain_lyerly, at wire office "Yahoo dot Qom"

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Captain Quinlin Hopkins
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« Reply #1 on: October 01, 2009, 11:51:44 am »

You are the most likely to take good care of it.  If your hands are unsteady, grab the nearest female in your home and ask her to give you a hand.  They tend to have much higher dexterity.  If you don't feel safe with them , don't bother with the local battery changer.  Find yourself a competent watch maker.  Your price for fixing it could be applied to the knowledge you might be able to garner from said watchmaster.  
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Sincerely,
Captain Quinlin Hopkins (Hoppy)

Do not ignore the freedoms of someone else, for eventually you will be someone else! 

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HAC
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HAC_N800
« Reply #2 on: October 01, 2009, 05:04:41 pm »

Is it a true clearance problem, in that the seconf had actually touches one of the other hands as they pass over it? Or does it stop randomly, no matter where the hands are?
Its probably the minute hand that has slipped on the cannon pinion, which sometimes happens in old watches, its more likely than the second hand riding up on its pinion.
  Its an easy fix, couple minutes with the tweezers , IF that's wht itis, and this is not a symptom of some oterh problem. I;d recommend a real watchmaker, not one  the the battery change places.

Cheers
Harold
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You never know what lonesome is , 'til you get to herdin' cows.
Captain Lyerly
Zeppelin Overlord
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Ukraine Ukraine


At the helm of the Frumious Bandersnatch


« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2009, 10:18:55 pm »

Thanks!

I will let you know how it goes.


Cheers!

Chas.
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Yaquina
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A Time Traveller has all the time in the world...


« Reply #4 on: October 04, 2009, 07:15:32 am »

Speaking as a person who collects antique pocket watches I beg you to NOT try and fix it yourself. Take it to a good watch repairman. You can quickly find one by calling any of the local high end jewlery shops in your town. They will have someone that they work with for watch repair.

By the way, if you give me the serial number from the watch I can tell you when it was made and the details regarding its making. The serial number is the one that is on the works itself, NOT the case.

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Wilhelmina Frame
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« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2009, 07:02:20 am »

Oh you weren't referring to The Marbles?
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HAC_N800
« Reply #6 on: October 05, 2009, 05:25:55 pm »

Speaking as a person who collects antique pocket watches I beg you to NOT try and fix it yourself. Take it to a good watch repairman. You can quickly find one by calling any of the local high end jewlery shops in your town. They will have someone that they work with for watch repair.

By the way, if you give me the serial number from the watch I can tell you when it was made and the details regarding its making. The serial number is the one that is on the works itself, NOT the case.


Speaking as a person who collects antique pocket watches I beg you to NOT try and fix it yourself. Take it to a good watch repairman. You can quickly find one by calling any of the local high end jewlery shops in your town. They will have someone that they work with for watch repair.

By the way, if you give me the serial number from the watch I can tell you when it was made and the details regarding its making. The serial number is the one that is on the works itself, NOT the case.





Ah, another collector, what do you have? Favorites in my collection include:

a 1919 Rockford:


an 1888 Longines in 14K.


a South Bend:



and this Illinois:



Also have a nice Hamilton 992b in bar over case..(dates from 1950). This was one of my work watches on the railroad.


and a bunch of others, latest acquistion being a 1924 Illinois model 5 in 12s





There are some good serial number web resources:
Elgin:
 http://trusted-forwarder.org/elgin/databases/elgin_sn_intro.html

Waltham  (compiled by NAWCC)
http://www.nawcc-info.org/WalthamDB/walsernum.htm


For most of the other American watches, unless you have reference books (Shugart is a good start), you will probably be only able to find approximate date of manufacture on the web. One of the most
difficult to find info on are the Illinois "private label" watches..


Cheers
Harold
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Captain Lyerly
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Ukraine Ukraine


At the helm of the Frumious Bandersnatch


« Reply #7 on: October 11, 2009, 03:24:11 pm »

Thanks, All!

Yes, it was a clearance problem; I took my time and went at it gently - it seems to be working fine now.

Some more data - pics to follow when I find the camera -

Lord Elgin, patent date Oct 9, '17; 19jewels, "Eight adjustments".

Case 14K

From the Elgin database:

Serial Number   SN Range RunQty Name Year grade size code   jewels Adj/reg/etc.
--------------  -------- ------ ---- ---- ----- ---- ------ ------ ------------
      20325189  20325001   1000   LE 1917 451*   12s o3n10p    19j A5P
    first run of grade 451;  189 of 14000 in grade;
    2189 of 10th model in 12s

It is a very very fine watch, engraved to my great-grandfather;  somewhere here I have HIS  great-grandfather's watch. 

That is a veryvery VERY special watch.


Thanks again!

Chas.
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