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Author Topic: "Forgotten" and "Never Built" Technology  (Read 1129 times)
JackNova
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« on: September 23, 2009, 04:53:19 pm »

Hello everyone,

I'm doing some research into "Forgotten" and "Never Built" Technology for some projects of mine and I'm wondering what others have learned about "forgotten" technology in the Pre-1900 world?

I'm specifically looking into stuff that was/could have been built but never was around the year 1810 but I figure, since a thread for this doesn't seem to exist, that this can be a general discussion on "Forgotten" Technology that was never widely adapted or built.

I'll start off with a few of my favorites,

- Several types of self driven "Steam Carraige" were proposed in both England and France around 1800 and in some cases could have worked had and capital actually been invested in them.

- Concepts for "Revolver" like pistols have existed since the 1600's. In fact, some had even been build, but were never widely adapted due to price. Examples include the Puckle Gun Patent and a prototype revolver from the 16th Century kept in the Tower of London.

- More efficient Breach Loading Rifles were possible during the Napoleonic War Era, but were expensive and not very applicable to the warfare of that era.

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Wells45
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« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2009, 05:40:15 pm »

I really don't know if this fits because it's "forgotten" but some components were built. For a while New York had a pneumatic subway similar to the one in the novel The Difference Engine. You can read about it at http://www.columbia.edu/~brennan/beach/index.html
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“We live in a society exquisitely dependent on science and technology, in which hardly anyone knows anything about science and technology.”  ~Carl Sagan
JackNova
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« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2009, 05:44:40 pm »

I think it counts as "Forgotten," at least forgotten enough. It was proposed and tentatively constructed but never fully utilized, which sort of falls under my criteria.

I suppose the real idea here is to discuss technology that could have made the future happen faster but didn't , like the Difference Engine and such.
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chicar
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Chicar556
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« Reply #3 on: September 23, 2009, 06:08:58 pm »

Want forgotten invention ? Here the mecca:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_historic_inventions

Here you will find (almost) all inventions of mankind, widely used or forgotten.

here some bonus non-listed pick:

- Hydrogen filled balloon was conceived in the 18th century by some french duo i don't quite remember the names with the collaboration of Lavoisier.

- In the 19th century, was seem in the street of London a man followed by a walking antropomorph automaton who was constantly repeating ''give me a soul''.

- Speaking of automaton, a automaton who can mimick living organism like Vaucanson's Duck could count as ''forgotten technology''.

- Pennicelium was known by native american, millenium ago before his ''discovery''.

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The word pagan came from paganus , who mean peasant . Its was a way to significate than christianism was the religion of the elite and paganism the one of the savage worker class.

''Trickster shows us how we trick OURSELVES. Her rampant curiosity backfires, but, then, something NEW is discovered (though usually not what She expected)! This is where creativity comes from—experiment, do something different, maybe even something forbidden, and voila! A breakthrough occurs! Ha! Ha! We are released! The world is created anew! Do something backwards, break your own traditions, the barrier breaks; destroy the world as you know it, let the new in.''
Extract of the Dreamflesh article ''Path of The Sacred Clown''
JingleJoe
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« Reply #4 on: September 23, 2009, 09:23:55 pm »


- In the 19th century, was seem in the street of London a man followed by a walking antropomorph automaton who was constantly repeating ''give me a soul''.

Please tell us some more about that one Grin your source of this information would be great too! Cheesy
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HAC
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« Reply #5 on: September 23, 2009, 09:43:43 pm »

Hello everyone,
- Several types of self driven "Steam Carraige" were proposed in both England and France around 1800 and in some cases could have worked had and capital actually been invested in them.


Hancock's Steam Carriage of 1833:



Between 1824 and 1836, Hancock constructed at his Stratford works a number of steam road vehicles, one of these being a three-wheeled four-seater car. In 1827 Hancock also patented a steam boiler that would split rather than blow (explode) so that the passengers being carried on his steam vehicles would be able to travel in safety.

In 1829 he built a small ten-seater bus called the Infant, with which in 1831 he began a regular service between Stratford and London. This vehicle was made famous by its later revenue-earning journeys from London to Brighton, which were a British first, and also demonstrated its usability by successfully ascending a frozen slope of 5 degrees where horse-drawn coaches were struggling. The vehicle was ultimately lost in an accident when the driver blocked the safety valve in order to increase the starting pressure and the boiler exploded.

On the 31st of October, 1832, the "Infant" took an experimental trip to Brighton, which was documented in Mr. Alexander Garden's "Journal of Elemental Locomotion."

On 22 April 1833 Hancock’s steam omnibus The Enterprise (built for the London and Paddington Steam Carriage Company) began a regular service between London Wall and Paddington via Islington. It was the first regular steam carriage service, and was the first mechanically propelled vehicle specially designed for omnibus work to be operated.

The service was brought to an end due to a dispute between Hancock and the operators, and Hancock himself built and operated further steam buses between 1833 and 1840.

In 1836 he introduced the 22-seat Automaton, and proceeded to run over 700 journeys between London and Paddington, London and Islington, and Moorgate and Stratford, carrying over 12,000 passengers in total and regularly travelling at speeds in excess of 20 mph.
  By 1840, however, the development of steam-powered road vehicles had lost impetus and the heavy road tolls imposed by the Turnpike Acts had turned inventors away from steam. Hancock was forced to give up the struggle, and the way was left clear for the operators of horse buses.
 Hancock continued working with steam and supplied a light engine (similar to his steam road coaches) to the Eastern Counties Railway. The boiler consisted of separate chambers which greatly reduced the risk of explosion.

 Hancock compiled some statistics of his operations. Over a total distance of 4,200 mi (6,800 km), he had carried 12,761 passengers. He had made 143 round trips from the City to Paddington, 525 trips from the City to Islington, and 44 to Stratford. 55 chaldrons of coke fuel were used (roughly 165 tons), equalling 76 mi (122 km) per chaldron; at 12s (60p) per chaldron, this equalled 2d per mile. Hancock's statistics also included the hours in service each day, which averaged 5 hrs 17 mins per vehicle, while the average time taken to make the 9 mi (14 km) round trip from Moorgate to Paddington was 1 hr 10 mins.

Cheers
Harold
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Wells45
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« Reply #6 on: September 24, 2009, 12:46:32 am »

- In the 19th century, was seem in the street of London a man followed by a walking antropomorph automaton who was constantly repeating ''give me a soul''.
Wow, this ties into Mann's "Affinity Bridge" that's mentioned in another thread. And I was thinking this was an unrealistic part of the story. This has changed my opinion.
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chicar
Rogue Ætherlord
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Student in Techno-Shamanism and Lyncanthrope

Chicar556
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« Reply #7 on: September 24, 2009, 01:29:49 am »

JingleJoe and Wells45:  My source is a installment dedicated to automaton throught history of a old educational comic short story series called '' Les Belle Histoire de l'Oncle Paul'' . Infortunately, all information (ONE single case) on this anecdote is entirely comprised on the few i already said.
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