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Author Topic: What's a good FIRST PROJECT?  (Read 2295 times)
Steαм◦¢hicк
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« on: September 21, 2009, 06:01:07 am »

Pretty new to steampunk and I'm realizing that there is SO MUCH you can make! O.o ... I don't even know where to start. Any ideas/instructions?
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David Godfrey Esq.
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« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2009, 09:23:15 am »

Lots of people seem to build goggles or repaint Nerf Mavericks. Personally I haven't tried either, and am not planning to do so. (I am working on a repaint for a ray gun though).

What you should do depends entirely where your talents lie. I started by covering a card reader in sticky-backed-plastic and painting it brass. Quick, simple and gave me a result in an evening. The keyboard gave me a greater sense of accomplishment, but took very much longer.

Whatever you do I'd start with something small and quick, and then work your way up to the larger projects that require more planning, material, time, money, etc. Cuffs? Garters? Brooches? The world is the mollusc of your choice.
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JingleJoe
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« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2009, 02:54:13 pm »

Dont paint a bloody nerf gun, damn plastic, blerg! Tongue

Make some nice metal and leather goggles, there's plent of tutorials for those around here Wink
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akumabito
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« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2009, 02:59:05 pm »

Thnk of something small you use every day and then think of making it more steamy. Alternatively, think of what your SP alter-ego would need frequently, then go about making that.. Smiley
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Katlyntje
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« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2009, 03:55:28 pm »

Well, there's the obvious goggles of course  Cheesy You could try your hand at jewelry-making, a flash drive case mod, fancying up a leather journal/sketchbook, if you have image-editing/computer graphics skills you could make some desktop wallpapers for your computer...there's so many possibilities I suppose it -can- be a bit overwhelming Wink
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stardust
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« Reply #5 on: September 21, 2009, 04:08:21 pm »

i started off dead simple, just covering a parker pen in leather and rivets then moved up to making a steamy top hat. as has been said, something small that you use regularly is a good place to start.

depending on how confident you are with electronics, you could possibly try a lamp. that seems a prett popular choice as well.
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lilibat
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« Reply #6 on: September 21, 2009, 04:11:18 pm »

What are you good at craft wise? What are you interested in learning to do? Can't make suggestions till those questions are answered.
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Gozdom
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« Reply #7 on: September 21, 2009, 07:36:13 pm »

What are you good at craft wise? What are you interested in learning to do? Can't make suggestions till those questions are answered.

Right. Start with what you have. If you have some experience with wood or electronics, think along that line. Enumerate your tools, try to avoid buying a lot of new ones (you won't, but try). I have built lots of scale models about 10-15 years ago, I'm glad I still have the tools. I think a lamp is one of the best things to start with, as they are actually useful. I'd have a hard time explaining the necessity of goggles (which I don't want to build anyway). A nice lamp is self-explaining. Also a good gift. I have nearly completed my first one.

Gears, machine parts as ornaments should be used sparingly. True applications never have surplus cogwheels or sprockets glued onto them as decorations. Rich and detailed ornamentation is fine. Victorian and even modern vehicles were often painted or decorated with motifs, either nonfigurative or traditional: wings, natural patterns, symbols of power. But these are what they are: liberally swirling ornaments, not trying to mimic function.

When you can display anything freely, without the urge to make it _logical_, that's called painting or sculpture. In fantastic literature, fantasy - as opposed to science fiction, where you cannot just conjure up anything by magic, but have to find that monster a place in the _system_.

Of course you can make an installation or a picture by attaching mechanical parts to a canvas. Some parts definitely look good by themselves, the inherent beauty of metal and machinery can make it a nice eye candy. Same goes to jewellery. But a working piece of equipment should look as if it was meant to be produced and used functionally. Car design is a good source for this principle. While many cars expose some of the engine parts to look good, there are no muscle cars with a piece of piping or a glued-on manifold that has absolutely no use.

Moreover, it is much easier to show off your work when it actually works. To laymen, your painting may look like some demonstrational material stolen from a factory. Some may ask themselves: why did this guy put a cogwheel on his wall? But if it is, say, a lamp, then even if it appears weird, its still a lamp, its there to illuminate the room, and within that group of useful items, it is definitely eye-catching, even if made of basic plumbing parts.
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Steαм◦¢hicк
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« Reply #8 on: September 22, 2009, 01:29:50 am »

What are you good at craft wise? What are you interested in learning to do? Can't make suggestions till those questions are answered.

I haven’t tried too much yet but I took woodshop ALL throughout my middle school years (haven’t done any woodworking for about a year and a half/two years); I like working with light bulbs and am interested in clocks and things with gears that don’t require electricity, but that stuff might come later because it is a little more ..Intense Smiley but yea pretty much any manufacturing of things I can use - I don’t want build up of dinky trinkets that aren't of any use to me :/
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Steαм◦¢hicк
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United States United States



« Reply #9 on: September 22, 2009, 01:31:05 am »

Well, there's the obvious goggles of course  Cheesy You could try your hand at jewelry-making, a flash drive case mod, fancying up a leather journal/sketchbook, if you have image-editing/computer graphics skills you could make some desktop wallpapers for your computer...there's so many possibilities I suppose it -can- be a bit overwhelming Wink

I like the journal idea! i might do that Smiley
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Gozdom
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« Reply #10 on: September 22, 2009, 05:36:35 am »


I like working with light bulbs and am interested in clocks and things with gears that don’t require electricity, but that stuff might come later because it is a little more ..Intense Smiley

Just stick with 12 V for a while. Should anything go wrong (construction failures, mistaken wiring, water or chemicals spilling), you negate the danger of a lethal shock.
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PockyNightmare
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« Reply #11 on: December 28, 2009, 03:43:41 am »

oh i have exactly the same problem xDDD

i did a brooch at first... but i totally failed... wrong kind of glue... well... i planned to do brass goggles now... there are LOTS of tutorials online and it´s not that difficult ^^

or u might do some accesoires... like belts or stuff... i did under-knee-belts from leather i found and sewed buttons and some brass chains at them... looks great with nice leather boots ^,^
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SteamCollective
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« Reply #12 on: March 13, 2010, 04:23:10 am »

My first project was re-casing a PC using an old shelf, the faceplate from a WW2 Army radio, a bank of switches from an old elementary school intercom system, an electro-hydraulic valve from an unused elevator in my building (I'm one of the owners, so don't think I just hacked into someone else's elevator  Roll Eyes !) and a few old vacuum tubes.  Throw all that together with a little bit of basic carpentry and boom!  There it is. 
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