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Author Topic: Pocket watch identification  (Read 4615 times)
Minus
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


Minus Fitzgerald, mechanic/tinkerer extraordinare


« on: September 13, 2009, 05:36:42 am »

Not sure if this is the proper section for such a topic but oh well.

I have inherited a fantastic spring driven pocket watch and i am trying to identify what the make is.

any help?



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Your humble mechanic-in-training at your service
Lucius Voltaic
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


I need a cup of the brown stuff, shade of an acorn

LuciusVoltaic
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« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2009, 05:28:18 pm »

What are the markings on the piece at the center right of the next to last picture? It's the same piece that goes off the bottom of the picture at the left of the last picture.
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"The man who is clever and lazy however is for the very highest command; he has the temperament and nerves to deal with all situations."
--General Baron Kurt von Hammerstein-Equord
HAC
Steam Theologian
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Canada Canada


HAC_N800
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2009, 11:26:47 pm »

Its hard to tell , as there are no specific ebauche marks visible, but a few clues are the finger bridge style, as well as the balance wheel, which is of the non-bimetallic style. Also, it looks to be a low jewel count. One small detail of interest is that the dial feet posts are not located at the outer edges of the dial..
Let me see what I can find out as far as an approximate date for it..

Cheers
Harold
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You never know what lonesome is , 'til you get to herdin' cows.
Minus
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


Minus Fitzgerald, mechanic/tinkerer extraordinare


« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2009, 04:56:38 am »

What are the markings on the piece at the center right of the next to last picture? It's the same piece that goes off the bottom of the picture at the left of the last picture.

It's the timing advance and retard lever, or so it says

And to HAC, I'm sure it does have a low jewel count, as it is atrocious at keeping time. It is always slow... It wa probably good to begin with though, as I am led to believe it might have been owned by my great grandfather who was the station master for the Glacier Railway Station, in Glacier, Washington State, USA
« Last Edit: September 14, 2009, 04:59:44 am by Minus » Logged
HAC
Steam Theologian
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Canada Canada


HAC_N800
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2009, 04:17:08 pm »

What are the markings on the piece at the center right of the next to last picture? It's the same piece that goes off the bottom of the picture at the left of the last picture.

It's the timing advance and retard lever, or so it says

And to HAC, I'm sure it does have a low jewel count, as it is atrocious at keeping time. It is always slow... It wa probably good to begin with though, as I am led to believe it might have been owned by my great grandfather who was the station master for the Glacier Railway Station, in Glacier, Washington State, USA

If he was a stationmaster, then that wasn't his working watch. its nowhere near the standard needed for an approved railroad watch..
The base standard was generally along these lines (these is the 1893 standard)

" .... be open faced, size 18 or 16, have a minimum of 17 jewels, adjusted to at least 5 positions, keep time accurately to within a gain or loss of only 30 seconds per week, adjusted to temperatures of 34 to 100 degrees Fahrenheit, have a double roller, steel escape wheel, lever set, micrometric regulator, winding stem at 12 o'clock, grade on back plate, use plain Arabic numbers printed bold and black on a white dial, and have bold black hands..."

The 1908 standard was a bit stricter:

" American made 18 or 16 size
Fitted with 17 or more jewels
Temperature compensated
Adjusted to 5 positions
Lever Set
Timed to +/- 30 sec/week
Fitted with a:
   Double roller
   Patented regulator
  Steel escape wheel
  Plain while dial
        having:
        Black Arabic numerals
        Each minute delineated
Open face
Configured with the winding stem at 12 O'clock"


Some railroads had higher standards, based on specific requirememts, as an example CPR required a dial having 24 hour markings.

Cheers
Harold
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Z.H.J. Lindenvale
Gunner
**
Sweden Sweden


« Reply #5 on: September 16, 2009, 11:49:18 am »

Minus,

I am not in any way an authority on pocket watches. However, the model shown above is strikingly similar to my 1906 Invar watch. It is nigh on identical, with only the face being dissimilar. I hope that this clue might aid you on your quest. Good luck!

Sincerely,
Z.H.J. Lindenvale
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Minus
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


Minus Fitzgerald, mechanic/tinkerer extraordinare


« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2009, 05:43:46 am »

Quote

If he was a stationmaster, then that wasn't his working watch. its nowhere near the standard needed for an approved railroad watch..
The base standard was generally along these lines (these is the 1893 standard)



Then his watch must have been this one.
Unfortunately, it has a broken winding spring Sad

Spoiler (click to show/hide)
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Minus
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


Minus Fitzgerald, mechanic/tinkerer extraordinare


« Reply #7 on: September 17, 2009, 05:47:25 am »

Minus,

I am not in any way an authority on pocket watches. However, the model shown above is strikingly similar to my 1906 Invar watch. It is nigh on identical, with only the face being dissimilar. I hope that this clue might aid you on your quest. Good luck!

Sincerely,
Z.H.J. Lindenvale

Could you post a picture?
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HAC
Steam Theologian
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Canada Canada


HAC_N800
« Reply #8 on: September 17, 2009, 05:24:48 pm »

Quote

If he was a stationmaster, then that wasn't his working watch. its nowhere near the standard needed for an approved railroad watch..
The base standard was generally along these lines (these is the 1893 standard)



Then his watch must have been this one.
Unfortunately, it has a broken winding spring Sad

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

That's a Swiss Bulova, movement is probably one of the older stepper motor quartz that superceded the tuning fork Accutrons.. Its a quartz watch, no mainspring, but rather battery operated.

Cheers
Harold
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Minus
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


Minus Fitzgerald, mechanic/tinkerer extraordinare


« Reply #9 on: September 18, 2009, 07:26:17 am »

That explains it!  Grin
Are batteries for this watch easy to come by?
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HAC
Steam Theologian
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Canada Canada


HAC_N800
« Reply #10 on: September 18, 2009, 04:45:49 pm »

That explains it!  Grin
Are batteries for this watch easy to come by?

Battery should be no problem... If its the movement in there that I suspect it is (Bulova 242) it should take a 344 battery.. I'd suggest you take it to a proper watch repair shop, and have it checked out. One problem that was common with those early Bulova qartz movements was that the stepper motor would stop working, stopping the watch. Its an easy fix and parts, while not common, can be obtained..

Cheers
Harold
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Z.H.J. Lindenvale
Gunner
**
Sweden Sweden


« Reply #11 on: September 21, 2009, 11:23:09 pm »

Minus,

I am not in any way an authority on pocket watches. However, the model shown above is strikingly similar to my 1906 Invar watch. It is nigh on identical, with only the face being dissimilar. I hope that this clue might aid you on your quest. Good luck!

Sincerely,
Z.H.J. Lindenvale


Could you post a picture?


I would if I were not in want of a digital camera. However, I took the liberty of procuring an image of another Invar watch which might lend you some measure of comparison.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Sincerely,
Z.H.J. Lindenvale
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