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Author Topic: Working with steel sheet metal  (Read 4904 times)
Kevin C Cooper Esq
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« Reply #25 on: July 25, 2010, 04:12:27 pm »

I just used Jinglejoes set up and apart from being in a rush and going off half cocked and not using a negative image it worked a treat, just what I wanted.
Hail Jinglejoe.
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Captain
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« Reply #26 on: July 25, 2010, 07:54:24 pm »

Sandblasting - knew a fellow in NC who would make friskets and sandblast metal or glass.



I have heard of folks even acid etching mild steel with Coca-Cola. 

There are also plating pens:



These are so simple even I have used them.  The hardest part is keeping the solutions from drying out. 
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-Karl
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« Reply #27 on: July 25, 2010, 07:58:31 pm »



There is also reposse which is basically hammering the design into the back of the metal to raise it.  There is a lot that can be learned for this very involved art form such as making "negatives" out of a wood stump or lead and collecting a wide variety of hammers and stamps.
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hardlec
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« Reply #28 on: July 26, 2010, 02:11:57 pm »

Clear Contact paper can be used if Frisket is not available.  Frisket is better.

The simplest way is to paint, maybe using a stencil.

You may want to look at Harbor Freight Tools for steel dies that can stamp letters and numbers.  They are not very expensive, but they are not very large. 
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Kittybriton
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« Reply #29 on: September 03, 2010, 12:05:38 am »

Since ******* vacated the premises shortly before my arrival we still have a few sheets of what I think is probably stainless steel (not showing any signs of rust or tarnish 8 years down the road) and I am wondering, since this material is non-responsive to magnets, what methods of joining pieces might be advisable? (other than welding!)
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Narsil
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« Reply #30 on: September 03, 2010, 12:23:25 am »

Since ******* vacated the premises shortly before my arrival we still have a few sheets of what I think is probably stainless steel (not showing any signs of rust or tarnish 8 years down the road) and I am wondering, since this material is non-responsive to magnets, what methods of joining pieces might be advisable? (other than welding!)

It could also be aluminium, the easiest way to tell the difference is by density, aluminium is about a quarter the density of steel.

For either material mechanical or adhesive joining are usually the first choices. For sheet materials there's a lot  to be said for pop rivets, epoxy adhesives also work well with the appropriate surface preparation.

Both aluminium and stainless steel can also be soldered and brazed but, less straightforwardly than other materials, particularly in the case of aluminium.

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Kittybriton
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« Reply #31 on: September 04, 2010, 02:00:31 pm »

Thank you, Narsil. I'm not sure how else I might test whether it is aluminium, but since, as you say, mechanical joints are likely to be the best option in my case, (I learned to braze as a student and haven't done anything involving brazing in the last thirty years) I shall keep your words in mind when the time comes to start cutting and forming.
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Narsil
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« Reply #32 on: September 04, 2010, 02:29:42 pm »


Weight is the easiest way to tell the difference between aluminium and stainless steel.

The density of steel is about 7.8 g per cubic cm, aluminium about 2.7.
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quatch
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« Reply #33 on: September 05, 2010, 07:03:51 pm »

You can differentiate between grades of steel by doing a spark test, e.g. http://www.capeforge.com/Spark%20testing.html

You could compare to a known sample of aluminium.
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Otto Von Pifka
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« Reply #34 on: September 07, 2010, 06:01:58 am »

as far as imprinting your numbers in the steel, you can also use a smaller and larger cold chisel to make roman numerals fairly easily. the chisel edge should be arrow straight and clean and not sharp! if its sharp it will cut through the metal instead of just denting it.

place the metal down on a good hard piece of wood and use the the chisels to dent the metal, the wood will give behind and support the surrounding metal. try to keep the metal in one place so as you use the smaller chisel to dress up the numbers, the areas already dented won't get distorted. lay out the numbers in magic marker or pencil so you have something to follow with the chisels.

practice on extra metal first! that way the quality of the first number will be the same as the last.

also if it is just plain old mild steel, you can use gun bluing to highlight the lettering, just follow the directions as far as cleaning the metal then either very carefully paint the numbers with the liquid (which can be very hard since the liquid is clear) or just blue the area and sand off the excess bluing from the high spots around the indentations.
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