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Author Topic: Little old-time hints and tips on how to fix stuff  (Read 7568 times)
Lady Charlotte
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« Reply #25 on: August 30, 2009, 05:27:15 pm »

which reminds me... if you are sprayed by a skunk a good way to remove the smell many know about is tomato juice but this can also be done with Coke. which i think might be alot cheaper than tomato juice
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Mina
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« Reply #26 on: August 30, 2009, 06:55:12 pm »

also with burns, if you accidentally touch a hot pan or some such, you can put some vanilla extract on the burn to sooth it.
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stardust
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« Reply #27 on: August 30, 2009, 07:08:38 pm »

i have a woodburning stove and burn myself fairly frequently (sometimes daily) during the winter.

i've tried many ways of dealing with burns, but the one way i've found that that results in absolutely no pain and no scars is this - put the burn in cold water immediately and leave it submerged for at least ten minutes. shake dry then drip neat lavender oil on. rip a leaf off an aloe vera plant (i keep many) open it up and apply to the burn. wrap leaf onto burn with gaffa tape and remove after between 5-24 hours. if the burn hasn't completely disappeared when you take it off then reapply lavender and aloe until it has gone.

this has been the most amazing cure i've found, and that includes all the proffesional and expensive burn creams.
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Miss Groves
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« Reply #28 on: August 30, 2009, 08:58:33 pm »

my goodness, i could take over this thread i know so many...i'll be restrained though...

bicarbonate of soda is a marvel.
Mix it with a little mint oil and you have toothpaste, lemon you get silver/metal polish, deoderant etc etc

Large leafed plants can have their leaves cleaned with a bannanna (no i can't spell it) skin

vinegar and newspaper for cleaning glass and windows...

ok i'll stop there
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elShoggotho
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« Reply #29 on: August 30, 2009, 11:16:38 pm »

Large leafed plants can have their leaves cleaned with a bannanna (no i can't spell it) skin
You could try to spell it like the Swedish chef...
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
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JennyWren
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« Reply #30 on: August 30, 2009, 11:27:46 pm »


My grandma used to do this with us kids - putting a cobweb on a cut or scrape will stop the bleeding.

Use only new cobweds, as older ones accumulate dirt, best collecting them on a morning
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« Reply #31 on: August 31, 2009, 02:19:26 am »

Large leafed plants can have their leaves cleaned with a bannanna (no i can't spell it) skin

The trick is knowing how to stop spelling it. A bit like Mississississississippippippippippippi. And do learn the difference between a banana (edible) and a bandanna (wearable). Some day it might save your life!
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Miss Groves
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« Reply #32 on: August 31, 2009, 10:23:35 am »

Large leafed plants can have their leaves cleaned with a bannanna (no i can't spell it) skin
You could try to spell it like the Swedish chef...


actually, i think that is where i got the problem from.
I was brought up on the Muppets as a child and have been known to randomly do impressions of the swedish chef in Ikea.....

and yeah, funnily enough i did know the difference between bandanna as i'm alergic to bananananananas
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Mr. Boltneck
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« Reply #33 on: August 31, 2009, 07:28:16 pm »

Quote
Anyone know any old timey uses for Brown sauce [Steak sauce?]
According to a news item in the Fortean Times a couple of years ago, a prisoner in the UK was caught after having cut through almost all of the bars on his cell's window, using aluminum-foil food trays, electricity, and brown sauce. From the sound of it, he was using an electrochemical etching system, and the brown sauce was the electrolyte. Not really an old-time hint, as far as I know (never done time), but a fascinating use for brown sauce nonetheless.
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sidecar_jon
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« Reply #34 on: August 31, 2009, 09:14:38 pm »

Quote
According to a news item in the Fortean Times a couple of years ago,

I congratulate you one your fine reading taste.... and brown HP sauce can be powerful stuff!
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Katlyntje
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« Reply #35 on: September 19, 2009, 11:05:31 pm »

Not really "old-time" but if you ever need to remove permanent marker from glass or plastic use a bit of lock de-icer. Put the de-icer liquid directly on the mark that needs to be removed, let sit for a few seconds then wipe off with a tissue or paper towel.
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SweetestPoison
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« Reply #36 on: September 19, 2009, 11:23:29 pm »

i have something like that called "Wir schaffens auch alleine: Koch- und Haushaltsfibel für hilfreiche Kinder und tüchtige Väter" which translates as "We can do it alone, too: cooking and home help for helpful kids and able fathers"

which tells you that peeled potatoes lose 20% of their vitamin C when you peel them and another 30% when you cook them..
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CacheForte
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« Reply #37 on: September 20, 2009, 04:29:12 am »

Not really "old-time" but if you ever need to remove permanent marker from glass or plastic use a bit of lock de-icer. Put the de-icer liquid directly on the mark that needs to be removed, let sit for a few seconds then wipe off with a tissue or paper towel.


Well, another way to remove permanent marker from smooth surfaces like glass or dry erase boards is to mark over the previous mark and immediately wipe it before it's dry. Works with dry erase markers, too.
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« Reply #38 on: October 21, 2009, 06:22:30 am »

Peroxide makes a good cleaner aswell  Smiley

I discovered, however, that trying to clean my white bathmat with hydrogen peroxide (thinking it would create a bleaching action) resulted in what looked like a burnt patch. I don't know if it was an interaction with the threads (nylon?) or with a previous attempt to soap it, but wow... So yeah, got a new bathmat now.


bicarbonate of soda is a marvel.
Mix it with a little mint oil and you have toothpaste, lemon you get silver/metal polish, deoderant etc etc

Straight bicarbonate of/baking soda as a deodorant can be too harsh, but you can get an effective cream deodorant mixing equal parts baking soda, cornstarch, and coconut oil. Plus, you get a bit of a coconut scent with it! You can add other oils as well for different benefits, such as for scenting or further antibacterial properties. Tea tree oil is the one I've seen mentioned for this, but I find that just those three ingredients alone do the job. It's not much of an antiperspirant, but it'll do a much better job than an antiperspirant of dealing with the bacteria that cause... er, well, odor in the first place. It's called deodorant for a reason! Much less itch-inducing if your skin is sensitive, too.
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Rockula
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« Reply #39 on: October 21, 2009, 01:01:32 pm »

also with burns, if you accidentally touch a hot pan or some such, you can put some vanilla extract on the burn to sooth it.

We always keep an Aloe Vera plant in the kitchen. A small cutting will provide enough 'juice' to almost instantaneously stop the discomfort of a pan burn.
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Captain Blackstone
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« Reply #40 on: October 21, 2009, 02:19:52 pm »

A nylon stocking can serve as a fan belt replacement.
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aquafortis
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« Reply #41 on: October 26, 2009, 04:29:58 pm »

Quote
Anyone know any old timey uses for Brown sauce [Steak sauce?]
According to a news item in the Fortean Times a couple of years ago, a prisoner in the UK was caught after having cut through almost all of the bars on his cell's window, using aluminum-foil food trays, electricity, and brown sauce. From the sound of it, he was using an electrochemical etching system, and the brown sauce was the electrolyte. Not really an old-time hint, as far as I know (never done time), but a fascinating use for brown sauce nonetheless.

Should've let him go Cheesy evil genius FTW.
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von Adler
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« Reply #42 on: October 26, 2009, 04:48:20 pm »

which tells you that peeled potatoes lose 20% of their vitamin C when you peel them and another 30% when you cook them..

Is it customary to peel them first before cooking where you're at? In my family, the peeling has always been after the cooking; however, I've always eaten them peels and all, originally because I was too lazy to peel them, later for the health effects (and because I still can't see the point in peeling them, except for the obvious blemishes; it's not like they taste any worse or are less easy to eat with peels on).
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SilasHarridenMD
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« Reply #43 on: October 26, 2009, 05:12:25 pm »

touching on banana's and warts again (eww mental image)
banana peel applied inside skin down to a wart and bandaged over shall begin to kill the wart.

also
banana skin is a good natural boot polish.
and
anthony hopkins is your best bet for killing a bear (points for the reference)
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1SG Thomas
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« Reply #44 on: November 18, 2009, 05:46:54 am »

Clean your silver by putting it into a dish with a sheet of aluminum foil (or in an aluminum pan) containing salt water or a weak solution of vinegar and water.  Instantly removes black.
1SG Thomas
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Ben Hudson, Esq.
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« Reply #45 on: November 19, 2009, 07:39:24 pm »

Bike inner tubes are profoundly useful.
A dried 'cob' from corn on the cob makes a handy file handle should the wooden one break (and in my experience, 'tis but a matter of time)
Vinegar solves near-enough everything
Petrol lighters can be used to unfreeze fuel lines in a push
Bit off topic (most of them are not old-time at all), but Tim Anderson's Handy Tips do exactly what they say on the tin.
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phaserrifle
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« Reply #46 on: November 23, 2009, 12:40:28 am »

should you be stung by stinging nettles, donot try to use dock-leaves, it's an old wives tale. instead grab one of the leaves from the nettle, pinching it between thumb and forefinger on the flat parts of the leaves (thus avoiding the stinging hairs which are on the edges of the leaves) and rub it on, crushing the leaf. obviously, if you have a number of stings, more than one leaf may be needed

the guy who taught me this is a survial instructor who was teaching us about wild foods, so he knows his stuff (I hope Undecided)
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Ben Hudson, Esq.
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« Reply #47 on: November 23, 2009, 06:17:17 pm »

should you be stung by stinging nettles, donot try to use dock-leaves, it's an old wives tale. instead grab one of the leaves from the nettle, pinching it between thumb and forefinger on the flat parts of the leaves (thus avoiding the stinging hairs which are on the edges of the leaves) and rub it on, crushing the leaf. obviously, if you have a number of stings, more than one leaf may be needed

the guy who taught me this is a survial instructor who was teaching us about wild foods, so he knows his stuff (I hope Undecided)

Sounds interesting... so do you pinch the leaf to release the... leaf juice (?), then rub that on, or just pick the leaf by pinching it and then rub the leaf directly onto the skin?
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phaserrifle
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« Reply #48 on: November 23, 2009, 06:32:23 pm »

should you be stung by stinging nettles, donot try to use dock-leaves, it's an old wives tale. instead grab one of the leaves from the nettle, pinching it between thumb and forefinger on the flat parts of the leaves (thus avoiding the stinging hairs which are on the edges of the leaves) and rub it on, crushing the leaf. obviously, if you have a number of stings, more than one leaf may be needed

the guy who taught me this is a survial instructor who was teaching us about wild foods, so he knows his stuff (I hope Undecided)

Sounds interesting... so do you pinch the leaf to release the... leaf juice (?), then rub that on, or just pick the leaf by pinching it and then rub the leaf directly onto the skin?

it's the juice that is the secret. IRRC you crushed the leaf first. the pinching is mainly the trick to avoid getting stung as you pick it.
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Aviatrix Abernathy
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« Reply #49 on: November 23, 2009, 06:48:37 pm »

mayo will take stains from piano keys, just wipe on give it a few and wipe off (it will kill headlice as well!)
 
ever away from a shower for a long time? Sprinkle baking soda (or baby powder) in your hair and comb it out. The powder will absorb most of the oils/dirt in your hair and will leave it pretty clean (the bakinig soda works really well for smelly dogs as well for when a bath is not possible)

to unclog a drain put 3 alka-seltzer tablets and a cup of white vinager down it, wait a few minutes and rinse with hot water (beats the smell of drain-o!)
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