The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
October 20, 2017, 08:56:27 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Support BrassGoggles! Donate once or $3/mo.
 See details here.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2 3   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Little old-time hints and tips on how to fix stuff  (Read 7480 times)
elShoggotho
Guest
« on: August 28, 2009, 09:30:31 pm »

Inspired by an old time pamphlet owned by my grandma, titled "Die tausendfache Fundgrube" (roughly "The thousandfold trasure trove"), which obviously is older than her and contains little hints on how to fix stuff in simple and inexpensive ways, here is a thread about exactly that: little things that can help you in everyday life.

I'm just using a vinegar solution to decalcify my coffee machine. Lately, it took about an hour to run through.

Off we go. The sky is the limit, at least for now.
Logged
Dr Alexander Sanguinarius
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2009, 09:55:48 pm »

You can clean rust off of items by soaking them in a bath of malt vinegar and a light scrub with a washing up brush (or tooth brush). The length of time required varies, I found overnight worked well when I tested this on a rusty spanner.
Logged

Herr Döktor
Gadgeteer, Contraptionist, and Inventor, FVSS
Governor
Master Tinkerer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Herr Döktor, and friend.


WWW
« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2009, 09:59:50 pm »

Coca Cola removes tarnish from brass; also a standard can of said beverage poured into and left overnight in a lavatory bowl will remove limescale.
Logged

JingleJoe
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
United Kingdom United Kingdom


The Green Dungeon Alchemist


WWW
« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2009, 10:59:36 pm »

If this thread takes off I might just have to sticky it Wink carry on the good work chaps Smiley
Logged

Green Dungeon Alchemist Laboratories
Providing weird sound contraptions and time machines since 2064.
Mr. Boltneck
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2009, 04:03:34 pm »

Vinegar and salt make a decent improvised brass cleaner. I suppose if you are suffering from unanticipated corrosion, a quick stop at a fish-and-chips place might be in order.

A stripped-out pan-head Phillips screw head can be remedied by using a narrow file to cut a straight slot, and carefully backing the screw out with a straight driver. I've used this once or twice with success. It beats having to get out the extractor kit.
Logged
stardust
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


friend of polar bear


« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2009, 04:05:19 pm »

a glass marble in the kettle is a good way to remove limescale.
Logged

and doesn't Mr. Kipling make exceedingly good cakes.......
Zwack
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States

And introducing the wonderful Irish (Mrs Z).


« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2009, 04:44:17 pm »

A small piece of leather around a screw can be used to temporarily plug a leak. 

Bar soap can be used to plug a leak in a petrol tank (not a permanent fix, but probably safer than just spilling petrol on the road while trying to get parts).

Diphenhydramine is sold as a sleep-aid.  If you use this it's good to know that the exact same product/dosage is also sold as an anti-histamine at a fraction of the cost.

Z.
Logged

"At least those oddballs are interesting" - My Wife.
I'm British but living in America.  This might explain my spelling.
Dr Alexander Sanguinarius
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #7 on: August 29, 2009, 05:49:20 pm »

Reading the petrol leak fix above, reminded me of this.

Chewing gum can be used to repair holes in petrol tanks, it hardens when in contact with petrol.
They used to use this "quick fix" during WWII to repair holed fuel tanks on spitfires.
Logged
punkandska66
Officer
***
United States United States



« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2009, 06:17:18 pm »

Vinegar and salt make a decent improvised brass cleaner.

Thank! I just used this, and it worked okay. I still want it like new though, so I've gone the electric route, and wired up my item.
But the salt and vinegar got rid of a bunch of the gunk.
Logged
elShoggotho
Guest
« Reply #9 on: August 29, 2009, 11:54:37 pm »

A little vinegar also does wonders to soften water. Just add it to the cleaning agent when preparing the washing machine for a run. More often than not, you can get rid of fabric softener and even reduce the amount of cleaning agent needed.
Logged
neon_suntan
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Gravatar

The scribe wore black

neonsuntan
WWW
« Reply #10 on: August 29, 2009, 11:59:42 pm »

Coca Cola removes tarnish from brass; also a standard can of said beverage poured into and left overnight in a lavatory bowl will remove limescale.

Another good lavatory/bathroom cleaner is baking soda and lemon juice.

Logged

clockwork creation
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Rapscallion Smile


« Reply #11 on: August 30, 2009, 12:01:18 am »

Peroxide makes a good cleaner aswell  Smiley
Logged

I am a freak in control not a control freak
wofflan
Gunner
**
Sweden Sweden



« Reply #12 on: August 30, 2009, 12:15:50 am »

Ketchup is very good to clean corrosion of copper or brass. Ive always said ketchup is good for just about everything Wink
Logged
neon_suntan
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Gravatar

The scribe wore black

neonsuntan
WWW
« Reply #13 on: August 30, 2009, 12:18:33 am »


Anyone know any old timey uses for Brown sauce [Steak sauce?]

Apart from with fried savoury food :-)
Logged
Captian Jay
Gunner
**
United States United States



WWW
« Reply #14 on: August 30, 2009, 12:37:03 am »


Anyone know any old timey uses for Brown sauce [Steak sauce?]

Apart from with fried savoury food :-)

I found one instance of it being used to remove tarnish from coins which suggest it could have other uses. (Vinegar I'd guess.)
Logged

...I'm not lost, just on an unplanned expedition.
Mrs. Sullivan
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States



WWW
« Reply #15 on: August 30, 2009, 12:57:42 am »

A bit of white vinegar in the wash will remove the odor of cat urine from fabric.

I've also heard that rubbing a piece of cut raw potato on a wart will help it to go away, but I've never had warts so I don't really know if this works.

My grandma used to do this with us kids - putting a cobweb on a cut or scrape will stop the bleeding.
Logged

I\\\'m in Darkshines\\\' Sewing Swap!
clockwork creation
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Rapscallion Smile


« Reply #16 on: August 30, 2009, 01:06:42 am »

That cobweb plaster is brilliant, I shall have to remember that one.
Logged
neon_suntan
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Gravatar

The scribe wore black

neonsuntan
WWW
« Reply #17 on: August 30, 2009, 01:12:00 am »

That cobweb plaster is brilliant, I shall have to remember that one.

Take the spider out first though
Logged
clockwork creation
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Rapscallion Smile


« Reply #18 on: August 30, 2009, 01:14:19 am »

My workshop is a spider utopia so if I cut myself I will have no shortage of plasters now  Smiley
Logged
Foucaults_Builder
Officer
***
United States United States



WWW
« Reply #19 on: August 30, 2009, 01:44:14 am »

Whenever there were no band aids in the house I would always tear out a piece of paper towel or napkin and use some masking tape to make my own.

Also, need a hose attachment for your drier? (The big stretchy pipe that ventilates) Instead of going out and buying one, just find an old pair of jeans hook up one of the pant legs to the drier and the other end to the wall space. Make sure to close off the unused pant leg. Works like a charm
Logged

http://foucaultsbuilder.wordpress.com
"That was when I saw the Pendulum.
The sphere, hanging from a long wire set into the ceiling of the choir, swayed back and forth with isochronal majesty." Foucault's Pendulum
JingleJoe
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
United Kingdom United Kingdom


The Green Dungeon Alchemist


WWW
« Reply #20 on: August 30, 2009, 01:48:48 am »

I've also heard that rubbing a piece of cut raw potato on a wart will help it to go away, but I've never had warts so I don't really know if this works.
I've got a little warty thing on my finger, could give this a go if I remember next time we're having potatoes Smiley
Logged
Kittybriton
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Steampunk: absinthe-minded professors!


WWW
« Reply #21 on: August 30, 2009, 01:52:42 am »

My grandma used to do this with us kids - putting a cobweb on a cut or scrape will stop the bleeding.

Used to be a favourite remedy with old-time carpenters; find a cobweb with the dew still on it (i.e. fairly recently woven, and still clean)
Logged

Join me in exploring the music of time!
(http://kittybriton.multiply.com/journal
Mina
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


Steampunk seraphim, femme fatale

jaimie_lee93
WWW
« Reply #22 on: August 30, 2009, 02:11:45 am »

toothpaste can be used to polish silver, tarnished or not.

wet tea leaves can be sprinkled on carpets then swept up after about 15 minutes to freshen and aid in cleaning
Logged

Come take my journey into night
    Come be my shadow, walk at my side
    And when you see all that I have seen
    Can you tell me love from pride?
Kittybriton
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Steampunk: absinthe-minded professors!


WWW
« Reply #23 on: August 30, 2009, 02:23:19 pm »

You reminded me, toothpaste can be used to fix small holes in walls (and I have a small hole in the wall that needs fixing)
Logged
Dr Alexander Sanguinarius
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #24 on: August 30, 2009, 04:55:04 pm »

If you  burn yourself, cut a potato and put the cut side on the burnt area.

I use this one quite often, grow a plant called Feverfew in your garden, it you have a headache or migraine, place some of the leaves between a couple of slices of bread and butter, and consume.
Feverfew is also good for arthritis and digestive problems, but I have no experience of its effectiveness in these areas.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.087 seconds with 17 queries.