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Author Topic: "Different" military units  (Read 1054 times)
groomporter
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« on: July 01, 2009, 12:45:45 pm »

With the idea that truth is stranger than fiction, how about listing some of the real off-beat experiments for military units as possible inspiration for steamed units. Such as:

The U.S. Camel Corps http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._Camel_Corps
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If a person who indulges in gluttony is a glutton, and a person who commits a felony is a felon, then God is an iron.
-Spider Robinson
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« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2009, 12:58:46 pm »

and http://community.livejournal.com/steamfashion/1074018.html
wherein lies:
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
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CaptSpaulding
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« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2009, 02:12:08 pm »

During the late 1700´s there was a discussion going on in Sweden about using moose in the military. Mainly for transportation. The discussion took place among academical big wigs down in Stockholm who never had seen a moose(they were not at all as usual as they are today and it would get even worse). These discussions have led to rumours about Swedish kings trying out moose as mounts for a cavalry! Rumours that still pop up from now and then. Unfortunately there seem to be no truth what so ever in those rumours. All discussions about using moose were stopped by King Gustaf III in 1775 when he stated that the horse should be used in the future too, and no further experimentation with moose shall be done!

In 1804 some experiments were done outside Uppsala. But it was no longer interesting to the military since the moose were almost extinct in the early 1800´s due to new hunting regulations.

But it would have been sweet and rather steamy with a moose-cavalry!
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Humbolt
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« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2009, 03:20:49 pm »

As I recall, the Camel Corps were intensely loyal to their spitting steeds. When the corps were disbanded, many of those involved opted to hang on to their camels.
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groomporter
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« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2009, 04:34:36 pm »

The Wiki article says some of them ended up escaping and going wild and that "These feral camels continued to be sighted through the early 1900s"
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Wisconsin Platt
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« Reply #5 on: July 01, 2009, 04:55:30 pm »

Odd.  I just watched the Have Gun Will Travel episode where Paladin used one of the ex-Army Camels.

Great show.
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Chris Siddall
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« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2009, 06:21:52 pm »

The british empire had in india had which started out as the Scinde Camel Corps and there were British, Indian and Australian battalions of the Imperial Camel Corps serving in the Trans-Jordan region of the Middle East

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

So camels in warfare, it's more likely than you think.
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Chris Siddall
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« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2009, 06:38:01 pm »

As everyone knows the modern military loves to get it's hands on the latest cutting edge technology and it was no different in the 1880's. Although dismissed as an expensive fad at the time the British Army was undeterred and invested in safety bicycles!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Army_Cyclist_Corps

There were Cyclist Corps pretty much everywhere especially in Europe, the US, Australia and New Zealand. The British disbanded theirs in 1919, I'm guessing that trench warfare + bicycles = not a raging success to the high command, but the Dutch seem to have kept theirs going till the 1940's.
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CaptSpaulding
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« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2009, 07:30:49 pm »

As everyone knows the modern military loves to get it's hands on the latest cutting edge technology and it was no different in the 1880's. Although dismissed as an expensive fad at the time the British Army was undeterred and invested in safety bicycles!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Army_Cyclist_Corps

There were Cyclist Corps pretty much everywhere especially in Europe, the US, Australia and New Zealand. The British disbanded theirs in 1919, I'm guessing that trench warfare + bicycles = not a raging success to the high command, but the Dutch seem to have kept theirs going till the 1940's.


Up here in Scandinavia they were still in use in the early 90´s. And I believe they still had it i Switzerland in 2003. The idea is crazy in a hilarious way. You were supposed to tie so many stupid things to your bike(Skis, mashineguns(Ksp/58), a board to put a dog upon!) and then grab a rope tied to a tractor and off you went! Sometimes you went really far. I know of units who travelled up to 800 km this way!

The Finns were even worse(or cooler depending on how you put it), since they still i the 80´s had wellingtons instead of ordinary boots while riding their bikes(I've seen it myself when I was a kid) after a tractor...

Spoiler (click to show/hide)
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Chris Siddall
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« Reply #9 on: July 01, 2009, 07:46:02 pm »

I stand corrected and amazed Capt, I had no idea there were military cyclist units still in service till so recently.
And for those who'd doubt the good Capt's word (the fools). The very Swiss Military Bicycle.
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

It does have steamy potential doesn't it?
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CaptSpaulding
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« Reply #10 on: July 01, 2009, 08:04:00 pm »

I stand corrected and amazed Capt, I had no idea there were military cyclist units still in service till so recently.
And for those who'd doubt the good Capt's word (the fools). The very Swiss Military Bicycle.
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

It does have steamy potential doesn't it?

While looking for pics of biking soldiers I found this picture:
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
Unfortunately not a unit, but the vehicle is called a kick and is a Swedish late 1700´s invention called "spark"(translated to "kick") and have seriously been used by the military for recon, short transportation and the like. It is a wintertime vehicle only usable with alot of hard packed snow. Up north people still use it in the winter.

Here a better pic of the Spark:
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
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Wisconsin Platt
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« Reply #11 on: July 01, 2009, 08:40:44 pm »

More Recently...

Spoiler (click to show/hide)
Spoiler (click to show/hide)


<shamelessly copied and pasted>

Few bicycle companies need to measure the size of an aircraft door when designing a new model. But Montague Corp., based in Cambridge, Mass., did exactly that when the Pentagon said it needed a lightweight, foldable bike that special-operations forces could carry as they jumped out of airplanes into enemy territory.

In 1999 Montague came up with the Paratrooper, which has a hardened aluminum frame and wheels, and beefy pedals. It weighs only 29 lbs. and can fold in less than a minute to a manageable size (3 ft. by 3 ft. by 1 ft.). The market for parachutists' cycles being small, Montague's sales languished until the U.S. invaded Afghanistan in 2001. U.S. forces found the bikes ideal for moving quietly and without using scarce fuel. Word spread throughout the world's tightly knit military community; Montague has sold several thousand bikes to the military and other government agencies as well as to a number of foreign armies.
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Chris Siddall
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« Reply #12 on: July 01, 2009, 08:56:15 pm »

I bought my dad a Pashley Tuberider bike a few years ago in anticipation of his retiring, and somebody told me it was based upon a folding paratrooper design from WW2. Didn't think to check it out but todays thread has lead me to this...

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

It's exactly the same design just without the folding frame mechanism

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Bike for the jumping out of planes with, h'attached to h'one paratrooper for the same.



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Kittybriton
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« Reply #13 on: July 01, 2009, 09:55:21 pm »

Although (as far as I know) they were never a real world unit, I have long been an admirer of the adventures of the Unorthodox Engineers Corps
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Arceye
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« Reply #14 on: July 11, 2009, 12:34:11 am »

Although (as far as I know) they were never a real world unit, I have long been an admirer of the adventures of the Unorthodox Engineers Corps


              Kittybriton I love those stories, the idea of the Unorthodox Engineers as explained at the beginning of one of the stories, that there was a need to be able to use local materials since the costs of shipping even a humble spanner all the way from Earth meant it was worth several times it's weight in gold. In one story a black hole was used as a cutting tool. Well it was the tool to hand.
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