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Author Topic: Non-steamed steampunk guns  (Read 301095 times)
Darkhound
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« Reply #200 on: November 25, 2009, 05:20:14 am »

Mr. Aaron, that's a direct knock off of the Smith and Wesson No.2, and likely a nasty patent suit if Henry Deringer did make it. While I've never head of anyone reproducing it in firing or non- firing form, the originals can be had for $500 to $2500. I would not even consider firing one, even if I could find a supply of .32 S&W short, but they do look nice!
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"Stupidity is a curse with which even the Gods struggle in vain. Ignorance we can fix."
bullzebub
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« Reply #201 on: November 25, 2009, 07:34:28 am »

What happened to the lever-action shotgun? I know there were a few models out there back in the day.. anyone still producing them?

Convesely.. just out of curiosity, are there any pump-action rifles around?? (non-smoothbore)


.22 LR is the only One I know of.
But nothing says you couldn't make one!

http://www.gunblast.com/Taurus_Thunderbolt.htm
http://www.awaguns.com/
http://www.remington.com/products/firearms/centerfire_rifles/model_7600.asp
and all semi auto guns could easily be made into a pump action rifle...
« Last Edit: November 25, 2009, 07:37:05 am by bullzebub » Logged
Maxpup
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« Reply #202 on: December 14, 2009, 01:52:12 am »

Has anyone brought up the Russian nagant revolver? It's the brain child of a Leon Nagant a Belgian watch maker...Clock work and firearms...what else can one ask for? As a gun for personal defense it's horribly inaccurate and underpowered, but makes for a good conversation piece and looks good in a holster hehe
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odysseus
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« Reply #203 on: December 15, 2009, 01:44:06 am »

My favorite is the Lancaster Pistol.

« Last Edit: December 15, 2009, 01:46:51 am by odysseus » Logged
Aether Pirate
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« Reply #204 on: December 15, 2009, 02:59:33 am »

Lancaster's are nice. I've handled one. Wish I could have afforded to purchase it.
The missus owns something similar, yet much more handy - a Sharps 4 barrel pocket pistol.
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
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tophatdan
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« Reply #205 on: December 15, 2009, 07:54:16 am »

The missus owns something similar, yet much more handy - a Sharps 4 barrel pocket pistol.
Spoiler (click to show/hide)


is that a function item that your 'missus' has, or is it purely a replica...
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« Reply #206 on: December 15, 2009, 01:32:17 pm »

It's a functional pistol, capable of firing .22 short rounds.
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Rick
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« Reply #207 on: December 15, 2009, 10:15:22 pm »

NAA makes some mini revolvers in .22LR and .22WMR that are 5 shot and similar in profile.

Very nice. My Volcanic lever-action pistol didn't work out either. The replica I received turned me off the gun. Sad

But I did order the $100 Weta ray gun. Got it about a week ago. Lovely piece. I still, however, want to find a nice historical firearm replica to use as a prop. I kind of like Hellboy's gun but all the replicas are quite expensive.

I'd love to find this as a replica but I doubt anyone makes it:

http://www.goantiques.com/scripts/images,id,2066747.html


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icyuod2
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« Reply #208 on: December 16, 2009, 10:01:00 am »

i guess I'm spoiled. my grandfather has the coolest collecting of guns. the only other collection i've seen that holds a candle would be the stock pile of guns at the f.b.i. building in washington d.c.

my faves would be the concealed or hidden guns. (my grandfather collects old western and black powder guns)
 he has guns in belt buckles, guns inside keys, woman's purses, pocket knives and yes the steamiest of all, pocket watches.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)
(not his gun, but he does have many like it.)
heres some of his concealed weapons (couple pepperboxes and other assorted derringers.)
sorry for the pic quality, its a picture of an old photo.
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

check out the arm mounted hand cannons (second shelf- the 2, front and center)
« Last Edit: December 16, 2009, 10:04:49 am by icyuod2 » Logged
odysseus
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« Reply #209 on: December 16, 2009, 03:11:45 pm »

Lancaster's are nice. I've handled one. Wish I could have afforded to purchase it.
The missus owns something similar, yet much more handy - a Sharps 4 barrel pocket pistol.
Spoiler (click to show/hide)


It is my understanding that Lancasters are quite a bit larger than pocket pistols, and that they were used by British officers in the field.  They are essentially four-barreled howdah pistols, correct?
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Roadkill
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« Reply #210 on: August 11, 2010, 11:04:19 pm »

My dad USED to own a sharps model 18[Something] but it was stolen when he changed his life for the better and we moved him out of his trailer in Nowhere, Alabama. It was very steampunk. Same kind that killed lincoln, and it wasn't a replica, I don't think. Beautiful gun, sucks that it got stolen, because if it didn't, it would definitely be mine right now.
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Captain
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« Reply #211 on: August 11, 2010, 11:23:38 pm »

Roadkill I see that you area  fellow necromancer bringing interesting back dead threads.  Wink



These are my lady wife's little S&W Model 2s in .38 S&W.  I cast and load rounds for her to shoot these in SASS competitions.  They were made in the early 1880s (probably '81 and '84 from the serial numbers).  Neat pistols with a lot of clever feature that made them very popular in their day. 
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« Reply #212 on: August 12, 2010, 01:21:38 am »

My dad USED to own a sharps model 18[Something] but it was stolen when he changed his life for the better and we moved him out of his trailer in Nowhere, Alabama. It was very steampunk. Same kind that killed lincoln, and it wasn't a replica, I don't think. Beautiful gun, sucks that it got stolen, because if it didn't, it would definitely be mine right now.

Roadkill, I agree that the Sharps 1859 derringer made by C. Sharps of Philadelphia is a beautiful gun and very steampunk-looking, but it's a four-barrel cartridge gun, usually in .22 rimfire but some were made in .30 rimfire or .32 rimfire:


The gun that shot Lincoln was a single-barrel .44 cal muzzle loading pistol made by Henry Deringer, also of Philadelphia, and of much simpler design:


Note that Deringer spelled his name with one r after the e, and the generic term for a small pistol of that type is spelled with two.
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Major Frye
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« Reply #213 on: August 12, 2010, 03:57:52 am »

Roadkill I see that you area  fellow necromancer bringing interesting back dead threads.  Wink



These are my lady wife's little S&W Model 2s in .38 S&W.  I cast and load rounds for her to shoot these in SASS competitions.  They were made in the early 1880s (probably '81 and '84 from the serial numbers).  Neat pistols with a lot of clever feature that made them very popular in their day. 


NICE little Baby Russians!  My complements on the fine taste of your lady wife, sir!  You don't often see the longer barreled versions like the upper one.  They look to be in very nice shape, too.  Good man, good man!

Cheers!

Gordon 
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Professor Arcana
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« Reply #214 on: August 12, 2010, 06:32:47 am »

Mine would have to be the Webley Mark IV revolver in .455 caliber, or even a later Mark VI also in .455.

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Mysteriosopher, contraptor, coggler, and scriptorian...among other things.
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« Reply #215 on: August 12, 2010, 08:56:24 am »

Has anyone brought up the Russian nagant revolver? It's the brain child of a Leon Nagant a Belgian watch maker...Clock work and firearms...what else can one ask for? As a gun for personal defense it's horribly inaccurate and underpowered, but makes for a good conversation piece and looks good in a holster hehe



I've wanted one for years,
and to my annoyance my long time friend bought one before I have;
He loves it.
Cheap, reliable, 7 rounds I think?
And it can use the Colt .32cal ammunition with a slightly different cylinder.
Very controllable when fired he said on account of it's weight.
Did some work for him with the pistol grips ( he's got massive hands, an needed larger surface area )
The triggers can be a bit worn out.
But for a pistol that's over a century old it's pretty solid.
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JosephR
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« Reply #216 on: August 12, 2010, 01:09:04 pm »

One type of revolver caught my attention some time ago - a pair of them were used by Brendon Frazier in The Mummy.
 

I kept asking myself "What the heck IS that?!" and finally had to look it up.  The Chamelot-Delvigne Model 1873:




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Utini420
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« Reply #217 on: August 12, 2010, 02:33:56 pm »

Dude, good spot.  The extractor rod on there always gave those a quirky look.

And because no one's mentioned it in a bit, I'm going to include the Le Mat pistol again.  Can there be anything more steampunk than a revolver with a shot gun in it?

Spoiler (click to show/hide)
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Major Frye
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« Reply #218 on: August 12, 2010, 04:49:44 pm »

Joseph, those French Ordnance revolvers are VERY well made pieces, and extremely sturdy.  Rather underpowered in my recollection though. I was lucky enough to own one for a while, and it was a very nicely made revolver.

I tend to be a strong Colt man, but I do enjoy Webley's as well.  Hard to beat a good Webley of any vintage in a tight spot!  Here's my latest, from 1885.  A Royal Irish Constabulary ("RIC") in .450", complete with holster and 100 rounds!



Cheers!

Gordon
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JosephR
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« Reply #219 on: August 12, 2010, 05:10:45 pm »

Gordon, I have yet to encounter any firearm that was "underpowered" - at least not such that I'm willing to be shot with it to show how puny a round it is.  Shocked

The Webley is a beautiful piece but I too am a Colt man - earlier I posted my favorite: the Colt 1917, a revolver that fires .45 ACP rounds (a LOT easier to come by than .455 Webleys!) via half-moon clips.  Here it is again:

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Major Frye
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« Reply #220 on: August 12, 2010, 05:47:57 pm »

Joseph:

An Excellent choice!  Sadly I had to trade off my M1917 Colt for the Webley, but I think it was worth it, since I have a decent British-issue New Service in .455" (bored to .45 Colt) still in hand.  Unfortunately I don't have a photo of it to post at the moment, but you know what they look like already...  Anyway, I would take the New Service in preference to the Webley, but either one is still a fine piece.  (It's interesting that you have the "gutta percha" grips on your M1917, while I have the wooden ones on my British Contract Colt.  We're just the opposite of issue! Hmmm...)

And yes you're probably right, I'm sure that the French Ordnance cartridge was sufficient to do the job, just as the .450" was for most cases. I guess growing up with the .45 Colt cartridge as my main "shooter" sort of prejudiced me in favor of a rather stout load though. My present "Carry Gun" is in fact a Colt Sheriff's Model SAA in .44WCF...  Grin

Nice piece BTW.  Gotta love those big Colts...

Cheers!

Gordon
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JosephR
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« Reply #221 on: August 12, 2010, 06:33:17 pm »

It's interesting that you have the "gutta percha" grips on your M1917, while I have the wooden ones on my British Contract Colt.  We're just the opposite of issue! Hmmm...
Actually the grips are hard rubber.  Grin  When I bought it about 20 years ago it had some crappy replacement walnut grips so I got these from Numrich, which was (and still is) out of the proper walnut grips.  I had intended to make some walnut grips to replace them until I visited the Tower of London.  There in a corner dedicated to the Royal Welsh Fusiliers I found a display about one of their officers who won the VC in WWI.  His sidearm?  A Colt 1917 with hard rubber/gutta percha grips.  So they're staying!

Joseph
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akumabito
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« Reply #222 on: August 12, 2010, 07:39:52 pm »

One type of revolver caught my attention some time ago - a pair of them were used by Brendon Frazier in The Mummy.
 

I kept asking myself "What the heck IS that?!" and finally had to look it up.  The Chamelot-Delvigne Model 1873:







Pretty cool looking things, eh? Todd's costumes used to do a copy of his double shoulder holster.. very cool, seems to be discontinued though.. Sad
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Captain
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« Reply #223 on: August 13, 2010, 04:19:59 am »

Auction was over.


« Last Edit: April 02, 2016, 05:19:24 pm by Captain » Logged
Captain
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« Reply #224 on: August 21, 2010, 05:02:46 pm »

Auction over.
« Last Edit: April 02, 2016, 05:19:50 pm by Captain » Logged
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