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Author Topic: Pocket watch went kablooey!  (Read 2102 times)
Capt_Zaphod
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Captain_Zaphod
« on: June 09, 2009, 02:02:00 am »

The second hand just divorced itself from the hour and minute hands; and is floating across the face of the watch.
The watch has of course stopped working.

Can anyone recommend how to fix this or point me to a site that can show me, please?

Thank you;
-Z
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HAC
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HAC_N800
« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2009, 02:12:02 am »

The second hand just divorced itself from the hour and minute hands; and is floating across the face of the watch.
The watch has of course stopped working.

Can anyone recommend how to fix this or point me to a site that can show me, please?

Thank you;
-Z


What's the make of watch, that would help in diagnosis. Generally, a second had coming detached is not a big issue and shouldn;t stop the watch, but it sounds as if you might have a problem with the cannon pinion (thats the assembly that carries the hands) or perhaps the third wheel pinion..

The cannon pinion is slid over the extended pinion (or shaft) of the movement's center wheel and carries the minute hand of the watch.

The arrangement of the critical cannon pinion is shown in the illustration left. The extended pinion (or shaft) of the center wheel (2, blue) rises through the bottom plate, and the cannon pinion (3, pink) is placed on top of it. As illustrated (blue arrows), a crimp in the cannon pinion tube creates the friction that allows the center wheel pinion to drive the cannon pinion (and the minute hand attached to the top of the cannon pinion tube). The amount of friction supplied by the crimp is critical. There must be enough friction to properly drive the cannon pinion, minute wheel, and hour wheel (4, green); but there must also be enough slippage to allow the cannon pinion to rotate on the center wheel pinion when the hands are manually set by means of the keyless works (without turning the entire movement of the watch). The cannon pinion is thus a clutch that must remain engaged during normal operation, but disengage during hand setting. As will be later discussed, improper friction at the cannon pinion is a common source of problems in the watch. This illustration also shows the seconds pinion (1, orange) of a center seconds watch. The seconds pinion rises through the hollow center wheel pinion. The hour wheel (4, green) rotates freely on the cannon pinion.



That might help you figure out where the problem is, I;d suggest a local watchmaker have a look..


Cheers
Harold

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You never know what lonesome is , 'til you get to herdin' cows.
Capt_Zaphod
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United States United States

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Chrono Corps Agent:42

Captain_Zaphod
« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2009, 02:11:54 pm »

Hello Harold;
  First I'd like to thank you for your assistance.  That was a very fascinating description of cannon pinion.

  It's a Lucky 13 brand watch.  Though, I'm afraid I don't have one of those new fangled digital cameras to take a picture with.  I'll be seeing someone on Friday that may be able to.

  I've had it less then a month ... and would hate to think that it's a major thing.

  {EDIT}  Just discovered that the button was pulled, which was why it had stopped.  So ... it does work, but the second hand is still being anti-social.

Thank you,
-Z
« Last Edit: June 09, 2009, 03:09:25 pm by Capt_Zaphod » Logged
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