The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
October 23, 2017, 09:46:43 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Support BrassGoggles! Donate once or $3/mo.
 See details here.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: "Bob's Your Uncle"?  (Read 2004 times)
vae_editor
Gunner
**
Antarctica Antarctica


Editor: Victorian Adventure Enthusiast.com


WWW
« on: June 04, 2009, 02:43:28 pm »

"Bob's Your Uncle"?

Being an American I'm often intrigued by British turns-of-phrase.

So I know how "Bob's your Uncle" is used... "and there you have it", but I was curious where it came from...

Low & behold!
<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob%27s_your_uncle">Victorian history.</a>
Logged
offtandiscord
Gunner
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Make the Instruments Autonomous!


WWW
« Reply #1 on: June 04, 2009, 05:53:33 pm »

Thus quoteth Sir Pedia of Wiki:

Quote
It's a catchphrase dating back to 1887, when British Prime Minister Lord Salisbury decided to appoint Arthur Balfour to the prestigious and sensitive post of Chief Secretary for Ireland. Not lost on the British public was the fact that Lord Salisbury just happened to be better known to Arthur Balfour as "Uncle Bob". In the resulting furore over what was seen as an act of blatant nepotism, "Bob's your uncle" became a popular sarcastic comment applied to any situation where the outcome was preordained by favouritism.[1] [2]As the scandal faded from public memory, the phrase lost its edge and became just a synonym for "no problem."

I have a great Uncle Bob. no an uncle who's great, but my mothers uncle...
Logged

neon_suntan
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Gravatar

The scribe wore black

neonsuntan
WWW
« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2009, 09:01:44 pm »


Can any American folk explain what a mephisto waltz is?

Or a thunderhead for that matter?
Logged

helios
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
New Zealand New Zealand


Probably not Death, the Destroyer of Worlds

eliasvonhelios
WWW
« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2009, 09:06:23 pm »

I have two uncles who are Bob. Neither goes by the name Bob, but the name still stands.
Logged

In smoggiest day, in sooted night
no ignorance shall escape my sight.
Let those who worship ignorance's might,
beware my power... Brass Goggles light!
Dax
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


"That is the Law. Are we not Men?"


WWW
« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2009, 11:52:23 pm »

Mephisto Waltz?  Not an Americanism that I've ever heard of.  As far as I know, its a piece of music.

A Thunderhead is a weather phenomenom that occurs from time to time during summer thunderstorms.  When thunderstorm is gathering, sometimes a cumulus cloud will form above the others and catch the suns rays.  This results in a white cloud towering against a dark gray background of other clouds, called a thunderhead.

Our thunderstorms can be a little unfamiliar to european visitors.  Last summer I was walking my dog prior to bedtime, and encountered a neighbor who had recently emigrated from the UK.  He was trying to figure out what the flickering lights on the horizon were; I explained that it was heat lightening, and gave him a 3 second explanation.  I'm pretty sure he thought I was pulling his leg.


Can any American folk explain what a mephisto waltz is?

Or a thunderhead for that matter?
« Last Edit: June 05, 2009, 04:24:35 am by Dax » Logged

Blackadder: A man may fight for many things. His country, his friends, his principles, the glistening tear on the cheek of a golden child. But personally, I'd mud-wrestle my own mother for a ton of cash, an amusing clock and a sack of French porn.
offtandiscord
Gunner
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Make the Instruments Autonomous!


WWW
« Reply #5 on: June 05, 2009, 03:03:24 am »

As a UK-ee living in the states I can confirm storm are different, HUGE to be exact, and pressure differences here have been ridiculous. I never got headaches 'cause of pressure back in blighty, but here it's something else...


pretty sure i can work out what lightning is though Wink
Logged
neon_suntan
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Gravatar

The scribe wore black

neonsuntan
WWW
« Reply #6 on: June 05, 2009, 06:55:30 pm »

Mephisto Waltz?  Not an Americanism that I've ever heard of.  As far as I know, its a piece of music.


Can any American folk explain what a mephisto waltz is?

Or a thunderhead for that matter?

I thought Mephisto Waltz was an instrumental by W.A.S.P. but I've seen it used in other contexts...


Other USA questions I have... how liberal are people there, one hears of very liberal areas but then of intolernace that beggars beleif
Logged
Honeybell
Guest
« Reply #7 on: June 05, 2009, 07:00:50 pm »

Mephisto waltz = Dancing with the devil... doing something you shouldn't.

The problem with America is that there are so many different places with differing standards of what is 'right and wrong'.  You can live in one place that is so backward and prejudiced, but then drive thirty minutes to another that has a whole different mindset.  The best I can explain it is... Take a bunch of little microcosms and stick them next to each other... America.
Logged
neon_suntan
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Gravatar

The scribe wore black

neonsuntan
WWW
« Reply #8 on: June 05, 2009, 07:12:17 pm »

Mephisto waltz = Dancing with the devil... doing something you shouldn't.

The problem with America is that there are so many different places with differing standards of what is 'right and wrong'.  You can live in one place that is so backward and prejudiced, but then drive thirty minutes to another that has a whole different mindset.  The best I can explain it is... Take a bunch of little microcosms and stick them next to each other... America.

Most English people's perception of America is quite skewed by TV/movie perceptions, where lue collar people re vey rarely depicted except tiwth one or two very notable shows. Whereas in England some people faeign working class [blue collar] roots far more than is sane or neccessary.
Logged
Honeybell
Guest
« Reply #9 on: June 05, 2009, 07:20:52 pm »

If English people go off of television and movies... no wonder they think everyone here is insane!  The 'entertainment' culture is very alien to most here (and inhabited by aliens... I mean stars, producers, directors...etc.)  The personas conveyed in movies and television are rarely actually manifested in real people.   Cheesy
Logged
neon_suntan
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Gravatar

The scribe wore black

neonsuntan
WWW
« Reply #10 on: June 05, 2009, 07:28:17 pm »

If English people go off of television and movies... no wonder they think everyone here is insane!  The 'entertainment' culture is very alien to most here (and inhabited by aliens... I mean stars, producers, directors...etc.)  The personas conveyed in movies and television are rarely actually manifested in real people.   Cheesy

But you are all thin, blonde, wasps living in Malibu beach houses, at least that part must be true...
Logged
Mr. Boltneck
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #11 on: June 05, 2009, 08:16:15 pm »

Heh. The British view of the US has been amusing me since I was a little 2nd-form kid at Thornhill Junior Mixed in London, c.1970. My classmates (and let's be fair, we were 6) were sure that if I came from the Western states, I had, of course, lived on a cattle ranch, rounded up dogies from the saddle, and spent the rest of the time firing off sixguns. They were damnably disappointed when I explained that my parents were, in fact, historians, and that we lived in the US in a place where the nearest cattle or horses were at least ten miles away in the Santa Cruz Mountains.
Later in life, I have dealt with, for example, the problem that many people from the UK and Northern Europe (including my Norwegian relatives) have with scale and distance differences. Here again, the movies have lied, if only by jump-cuts between parts of the country that are a good 1500km apart in real life, and hence a bit more than a casual short drive. I cannot, for example, motor up to the Grand Teton range over the weekend, although if I left this evening after work, I might, Donner Pass weather permitting, be able to breakfast in Reno.
Sadly, this perceptual gap also causes some fatalities on a regular basis: someone from the UK, Europe, or Japan, decides to rent a vehicle and drive to various widely-spaced bits of desert (say, Reno, NV, Taos, NM, and Flagstaff, AZ with a stop at Tombstone). What they fail to realize is that we are not just being spoiled wimps here when we say that conditions can be extreme, distances large, and preparation necessary. Every now and then, one of these folks ends up dying of heat and dehydration, altitude, hypothermia, flash-floods, snakebite, or whatever. There are plenty of places, some of them easily reached from my home, where you can manage any or all of these within about eighteen hours. It generally comes out that everyone at home thought they were just "going for a drive in the countryside, and that's safe, isn't it?" The answer of course, being "no, and the nearest medical help is 200 miles thataway, and nobody is likely to pass this bit of road to help out for the next twelve hours."
Another place where the movies and TV lie: North of say, Santa Barbara, there are plenty of beaches, but the surf is often violent, the water is cold, and surfers are wearing full wetsuits, not bikinis. For example, Mavericks is just a bit to my Northwest over the mountains. It's amazing how many people come out here, and say "let's go to the beach" expecting Malibu. Similarly, a common summer pastime is watching tourists in San Francisco shiver and turn bluish in "sunny California."
Logged
Honeybell
Guest
« Reply #12 on: June 05, 2009, 08:40:43 pm »

*Adjusts her bikini and stares out at her million-dollar pool, then glances down at her million-dollar chest.*

I'm sure I have no I idea what you speak of.   Huh
Logged
jringling
Time Traveler
****
United States United States


convicted Rogue and Vagabond…long story…


WWW
« Reply #13 on: June 05, 2009, 08:55:21 pm »

Hmmmm... the most realistic tv show I can think of is "Married with Children" Not very glamorous...
Logged

Herr Döktor
Gadgeteer, Contraptionist, and Inventor, FVSS
Governor
Master Tinkerer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Herr Döktor, and friend.


WWW
« Reply #14 on: June 05, 2009, 09:27:22 pm »

Hmmmm... the most realistic tv show I can think of is "Married with Children" Not very glamorous...

I always suspected this to be true.

I did work for a while in LA, and I have to agree that the perception one has of the US from over here is very different from the reality.

Picture me wandering through various areas of Southern California blithely unaware that I was walking through Russiatown and the various turfs of strange gangs, smiling 'Hello!' to people that made eye contact, and miraculously surviving...

Wink

Any of you Colonials have your illusions casually shattered when you ventured across the pond?
Logged

clairdelune
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States



« Reply #15 on: June 05, 2009, 09:58:45 pm »


I did work for a while in LA, and I have to agree that the perception one has of the US from over here is very different from the reality.

Picture me wandering through various areas of Southern California blithely unaware that I was walking through Russiatown and the various turfs of strange gangs, smiling 'Hello!' to people that made eye contact, and miraculously surviving...

Wink

Any of you Colonials have your illusions casually shattered when you ventured across the pond?

Glad you survived the mean streets of California! As far as having illusions shattered-My adolescent self was convinced everything in England had to be edgy and cool.  Then at 15, I went to London for the first time with a school trip.  I sneaked out of the hotel with my suitemates to go clubbing and ended up at the Hippodrome.  They played the worst music possible(a la Neutron Dance from the Pointer Sisters and Sussudio from Phil Collins) and the crowd was much older and more conservative than our angsty jailbait selves. 

Logged
Mr. Boltneck
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #16 on: June 06, 2009, 03:09:06 am »

Quote
Picture me wandering through various areas of Southern California blithely unaware that I was walking through Russiatown and the various turfs of strange gangs, smiling 'Hello!' to people that made eye contact, and miraculously surviving...
Yeah, TV and movies make it look like there are obvious Bad Neighborhoods. In real life, places like Compton or South Central mostly look more or less like a lot of nearby places with much lower danger levels. Back in the bad ol' 80's, I had friends living in East Palo Alto, which was Murder City #1 for two years running at the time. One anecdote I still find interesting: I was hanging out with my bartender pal Peggy and some others (I was a bouncer at the time, and a bunch of us professionally-nocturnal types tended to wind up the morning together). Someone commented that the street seemed pretty nice and quiet. Peggy nodded in the direction of a condo down the block, and informed us that the biggest crack dealer in those parts lived there. He had let the word go forth that anybody causing any sort of police-attracting disturbance on that block would find the police to be the very least of his worries; ergo, an apparently nice, calm neighborhood.
Logged
Jake of All Trades
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


Brass addict, inventor, and scoundrel with a heart


WWW
« Reply #17 on: June 06, 2009, 03:31:45 am »

Quote
Picture me wandering through various areas of Southern California blithely unaware that I was walking through Russiatown and the various turfs of strange gangs, smiling 'Hello!' to people that made eye contact, and miraculously surviving...
Yeah, TV and movies make it look like there are obvious Bad Neighborhoods. In real life, places like Compton or South Central mostly look more or less like a lot of nearby places with much lower danger levels. Back in the bad ol' 80's, I had friends living in East Palo Alto, which was Murder City #1 for two years running at the time. One anecdote I still find interesting: I was hanging out with my bartender pal Peggy and some others (I was a bouncer at the time, and a bunch of us professionally-nocturnal types tended to wind up the morning together). Someone commented that the street seemed pretty nice and quiet. Peggy nodded in the direction of a condo down the block, and informed us that the biggest crack dealer in those parts lived there. He had let the word go forth that anybody causing any sort of police-attracting disturbance on that block would find the police to be the very least of his worries; ergo, an apparently nice, calm neighborhood.
Yeah, Detroit's like that too.  "Poor-but-kindly" blends seamlessly into "sketchy" and back again, often several times over along one block. 
Logged

"...it's a form of fiction, and as such, while there may be times when it's considered a worthy vehicle for pointing out some of society and individual flaws - I still want a side that will let there be lighthearted adventures in the clouds, on mars, or under the sea."
--Tinkergirl
Captain Phyl
Gunner
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Gravatar

Frankly, my dear, I don't give a flying toss.

PhylNotCharles
« Reply #18 on: June 06, 2009, 06:27:58 pm »

My mum tends to use the expression "Bob's your uncle, and Fanny's your aunt." I've never been quite sure if it was one of our strange family catchphrases, or something widely used.
Logged

Captain Lumina de Voltairine,
at your service.

"Surrealism has been insulted and the grammar is appalling!"
Fighting for peace!? If you'll pardon my French, is that not rather like screwing for virginity?
Violet Rose
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #19 on: June 06, 2009, 06:33:32 pm »

Fanny means something very different over here btw
Logged

I'm in Darkshines sewing swap!

Declaring war on mediocrity and a pox on the foot soldiers of stupidity
neon_suntan
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Gravatar

The scribe wore black

neonsuntan
WWW
« Reply #20 on: June 06, 2009, 06:37:16 pm »

Fanny means something very different over here btw


Which makes it very confusing if you see a large billboard advertising the play or movie

"Fanny by Gaslight"
Logged
Captain Phyl
Gunner
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Gravatar

Frankly, my dear, I don't give a flying toss.

PhylNotCharles
« Reply #21 on: June 15, 2009, 05:53:23 pm »

Fanny means something very different over here btw
Uh, I am over there. And I'm well aware of that meaning...
Logged
Violet Rose
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #22 on: June 15, 2009, 08:06:11 pm »

Sorry about that  Cheesy
Logged
H. MacHinery
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


« Reply #23 on: June 16, 2009, 01:28:40 am »

Later in life, I have dealt with, for example, the problem that many people from the UK and Northern Europe (including my Norwegian relatives) have with scale and distance differences. Here again, the movies have lied, if only by jump-cuts between parts of the country that are a good 1500km apart in real life, and hence a bit more than a casual short drive. I cannot, for example, motor up to the Grand Teton range over the weekend, although if I left this evening after work, I might, Donner Pass weather permitting, be able to breakfast in Reno.

I had an acquaintance who told me of her UK friends who planned a 1-week visit to the US, where they planned to arrive in NYC, drive to DC, on to DisneyWorld, then to St Louis, etc, etc.

She was forced to inform them that NYC to Orlando was a 2-day drive.

America, where 100 years ia a long time
Europe, where 100 miles is a long way.
Logged
Vancouver Air Privateer
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


Privateering off HMAS Landeythan


« Reply #24 on: June 16, 2009, 02:54:36 am »

Hmm, not American, but I'm Canadian and our national past time is trying to classify and make sense of Americans. I've actually been to Europe and almost found the adjustment there to be better - Canadians and Americans have some strangely large differences. The Canadians try to act different to distinguish themselves... and the Americans mostly ignore it.  Smiley
Logged

"Blessed be Science and her handmaiden Steam;
They make Utopia only half a dream."

"So he pulls an alternating-current taser on me and tells me that only the Official Serbian Church of Tesla can save my polyphase intrinsic electric field, known to non-engineers as 'the soul.' "
Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.501 seconds with 16 queries.