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Author Topic: Clockwork Speech  (Read 1134 times)
Azaulathis
Swab

United States United States


The Alchemist


« on: May 13, 2009, 08:09:16 pm »

Me and an associate have to do a speech on clockwork and it's relation to physics. When my partner chose the topic, he didn't think it through and we realized we had no idea how we would manage to explain this. I would appreciate your help in explaining clockwork. We do know some VERY basic (I emphasize "VERY" and "basic") applications of this project, but would like some extra help.

Please assist
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Mr. Boltneck
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2009, 07:56:01 pm »

Can you expand on this a bit more? What sort of aspects of physics and clockwork are you trying to relate? Perhaps I am obtuse, and missing the obvious.
Certainly the motion of a pendulum, and Huygens' cycloidal solution to the problem of isochronous pendulum movements have a lot of good physics issues in them.
There is also the problem of temperature variation (for example, its tendency to change pendulum length) and its solutions (gridirons, mercury regulators, etc.), but that may be veering more into engineering and materials, and thus a bit into the weeds for your purpose.
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HAC
Steam Theologian
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Canada Canada


HAC_N800
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2009, 09:56:37 pm »

"An associate and I" - TFTFY   Grin  Grin
I'd say that agree with Mr. Boltneck, with regards to physics, the pendulum and Huygen's applications to it are the basis for mechanical timekeeping. You might want to get into the effects of heat on metals, and how solving that problem applies to balances and escapements, but after that its pretty much engineering..
 Again, more info on what you need to accomplish would be useful..
Cheers
Harold
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Zwack
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States

And introducing the wonderful Irish (Mrs Z).


« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2009, 03:43:23 pm »

At a more basic level you could talk about the conversion of kinetic energy into potential energy and back again when winding a watch/clock/toy.  There is the damped oscillations of the pendulum, gravity and weights on cuckoo clocks, you have a few options there.  Going by your age you're still in high school, so I'm guessing that the simpler things are more likely to be what you want to talk about.

Z.
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Azaulathis
Swab

United States United States


The Alchemist


« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2009, 02:33:44 am »

Thank you all. You are correct in the assumption this is a high school physics class, so basic applications are preferable. However, the more advanced topics are acceptable as well, I'll take anything I can get at this point. Thank you for the support.
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