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Author Topic: Sun/Moon Gear System  (Read 1362 times)
Doktor Claw
Gunner
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« on: April 12, 2009, 12:42:30 pm »

This might be more relevant to tactile, as the project does not involve a clock, per se. That said, it it entirely to do with clockwork, so here we are... Also, I'm rather a novice when it comes to clockwork, so I apologise for using what might seem like confusing language.

A while ago I came up with an idea for a clockwork-powered candelabra, the idea being that the sun gear would be powered by a clock mechanism, ticking at the speed of the second hand, then this turn would be transferred through a series of fixed gears to the outermost wheel, with teeth on the inside, which would rotate. Affixed to the wheel would be the candles. I got as far as mocking up the gear train, before realising the bleeding obvious; the clockwork mechanism is not powerful enough to drive such an assemblage.

I think that I have two options as to where to go from here.

Firstly, I think that if I replace the mainspring with a worm gear hooked up to a small electric motor, then this might provide the power I need, due to favourable gear ratios. Am I right, or is this just going to fall foul of the point below?

Alternatively, I'm under the impression that the balance staff and wheel are restraining the "power output", is this right? I know that these components regulate the timing, but do they reduce the amount of torque as well? If this is the case, is there an alternative timing regulator I could use? I guess I might be able to bodge together a small pendulum, but that seems unlikely right now, so if anyone has any other ideas that would be appreciated!

If you've skipped to the end, here's a summary. Need a high torque/power output from a small clock movement; what are my options?

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rogue_designer
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


clockwork gypsy


« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2009, 02:52:36 pm »

I would look, not at a clock movement, but maybe at something like a 24 hour (or 1 week) drum graph (for temperature/humidity).

Much higher torque spring and gearing.

The mechanism you are planning sounds interesting, but also sounds like ot does run the risk of jamming and binding unless your gearing is spot on and locked in place pretty well.
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(Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes. But deserve a nice glass of absinthe. I have some Montemarte in the cabinet, if you wish.)
HAC
Steam Theologian
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Canada Canada


HAC_N800
« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2009, 04:41:31 pm »


Alternatively, I'm under the impression that the balance staff and wheel are restraining the "power output", is this right? I know that these components regulate the timing, but do they reduce the amount of torque as well? If this is the case, is there an alternative timing regulator I could use? I guess I might be able to bodge together a small pendulum, but that seems unlikely right now, so if anyone has any other ideas that would be appreciated!


That's one of the functions of the escapement.. the other is regulation.

 The escapement  converts continuous rotational motion (from the mainspring barrlels) into an oscillating or back and forth motion that is regulated to maintain the reate needed for timekeeping.  Without the escapement, the system would unwind rapidly and uncontrollably. The escapement regulates this motion, controlled by the periodic swing of the pendulum or balance wheel. It allows the gears to advance or 'escape' a fixed amount with each swing, moving the timepiece's hands forward at a steady rate. A second function of the escapement is to keep the pendulum or balance wheel moving by giving it a small push each swing.
Each swing of the pendulum releases the escapement, making it change from a "locked" state to a "drive" state for a short period that ends when the next tooth on the gear hits the locking surface on the escapement. It is this periodic release of energy and rapid stopping that makes a clock "tick;" it is the sound of the gear train suddenly stopping when the escapement locks again.
 
I'd agree that you might want something with a higher torque output than a standard clock movement, though..

Cheers
Harold

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You never know what lonesome is , 'til you get to herdin' cows.
woyzeck
Swab

United States United States


« Reply #3 on: April 13, 2009, 02:19:28 am »

Are you talking about an Orrey?  Maybe you could find a crank model and hook up your candles to that... then find a slow motor.
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