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Author Topic: Watchmaker gubbins  (Read 1349 times)
T. Sheldon
Deck Hand
*
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« on: April 01, 2009, 10:51:57 pm »

Not sure if this will be of interest but I was a watchmaker for around 3 years, along the way I picked up some tools and parts (servicing 20-30 watches a day you gets you through a lot of parts!) and I took photos of some of the stuff lying around.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

There are all kinds of things in this photo. The orange box is filled with date rings, the packet towards the bottom-left is full of mainspring barrels, there are dials, tachometer rings, backs, straps/bracelets and even complete movements all over the place and the larger packets are chock-a-block full of bits and bobs.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Here are some of the tools I used. Starting on the left there's a case-knife, pillars, cutters, eyeglass, screwdriver set, handy metal block thingy, hand-removal thingys and puffer. The golden-handled tool is a vice used to hold stems for filing. The tool on the far right I only remember ever using to pinch the cannon arbour when it became loose.

Some of the essential tools not in the above picture are tweezers, oil pens, movement vices and... blu-tac!

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Couple of photos that I thought looked steamy.

If anyone has any questions about watchmaking I'll do my best to answer them. If you want photos of watch parts to use as a background or something like that I'll be happy to do that too.
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HAC
Steam Theologian
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Canada Canada


HAC_N800
« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2009, 11:16:47 pm »

Nice to see you here, welcome.
There are 3 things I still have problems with, replacing a balance assembly, I have real trouble getting the hairspring between the studs, I hate putting hands back on, and I really have problems cutting a new stem to the correct length.. Any tips?

Cheers
Harold
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You never know what lonesome is , 'til you get to herdin' cows.
clockwork creation
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Rapscallion Smile


« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2009, 11:25:12 pm »

blast i need a new case knife
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I am a freak in control not a control freak
T. Sheldon
Deck Hand
*
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #3 on: April 02, 2009, 12:00:56 am »

Nice to see you here, welcome.

Thank you. Smiley

There are 3 things I still have problems with, replacing a balance assembly.

Do you mean the entire balance, including the balance plate? If so, it's just a matter of getting the balance pinion hooked into the lower jewel (what was it called? The spring-loaded jewels have a name but I've forgotten a lot of the lingo) and then lowering the balance plate on top of it.

I have real trouble getting the hairspring between the studs.

Not much I can say other than get that block-bit at the end of the hairspring half-into its place first and then fiddle with getting the hairspring lined up between the studs before easing it into place. Really, when it comes to the hairspring the less you have to deal with it the better!

I hate putting hands back on.

What are you having trouble with? Are you having problems with clearance? Are the hands often loose?

I really have problems cutting a new stem to the correct length.

Place the movement instead the case, stick the stem in and make a nick with your screwdriver a little ways after the case tube (or you can skip all this and just eyeball it), take the stem out and cut it where you marked the stem and after that it's a case of filing the stem down if it's too long. If you make the stem too short you can pack the crown. I think that's how I was taught to do it.
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HAC
Steam Theologian
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Canada Canada


HAC_N800
« Reply #4 on: April 02, 2009, 12:54:19 am »

Thanks.. Guess I'll pick up some junker movements, and practice a bit more.. I finally got oiling down right..
As for hands, I'm using tweezers, and I guess its getting the clearances thats the real pain. perhaps a handsettting tool would work better for me?

Thanks for the tips.. appreciate it..
Cheers
Harold
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T. Sheldon
Deck Hand
*
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2009, 03:26:55 pm »

As for hands, I'm using tweezers, and I guess its getting the clearances thats the real pain. perhaps a handsettting tool would work better for me?

Using tweezers to set the hands is difficult! Using a hand-setting tool (there's one in the second photo) makes it far easier and it's less likely to damage the hands or dial if you make a mistake.

When it comes to hand clearance it's just a matter of using the thicker part of your tweezers to bend the hands if they need it. If you're having real problems with hand clearance it's worth checking to see if someone has replaced the centre wheel, cannon pinion or hour wheel and gotten it wrong. Another possibility would be that someone had somehow messed up the dial feet, or the underside of the dial, meaning the dial wasn't as flush with the movement as it should be. Lastly, someone might've put an incorrect glass in, though saying that you'd often see watches that had gone through other watchmakers with bowed or raised glasses to make setting the hands easier. Undecided

Thanks for the tips.. appreciate it..

No worries. Replying to you is bringing it all back after being out of practice for so long. Smiley
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