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Author Topic: how to stick plastic to varnished wood?  (Read 10000 times)
The_Steam_Master
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« on: March 16, 2009, 03:09:08 pm »

basically i have bought a guitar specifically for the customisation purpose (i shall call it The Deadbeat and it shall be sexy) and my idea is to stick alot of guitar picks all over the body (i have at least 37 for this task) but i have no idea how i would actually do it, would normal superglue work or should i look for a special kind of glue to do this

inspiration taken from Zakk Wylde's Rebel Les Paul
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stockton_joans
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« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2009, 04:01:51 pm »

a 2 part epoxy should do the trick
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« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2009, 04:17:35 pm »

a 2 part epoxy should do the trick
I'd agree. Also, roughening-up the varnish on the areas you are going to be sticking things to (with a bit of sandpaper or emery board) will give the adhesive a key and help it stick fast.
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"Doctor Prunesquallor, with his hyena laugh, his bizarre and elegant body, his celluloid face. His main defects? The insufferable pitch of his voice; his maddening laughter and his affected gestures. His cardinal virtue? An undamaged brain."
Gryphon
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« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2009, 04:31:10 pm »

If it's a solid-body electric, you can just nail them on like the bottlecaps have been in your example pic.
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The_Steam_Master
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« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2009, 06:51:32 pm »

If it's a solid-body electric, you can just nail them on like the bottlecaps have been in your example pic.

its a hollow body electric with f holes, and id rather not nail them anyway even if it was solid, theyre all special guitar picks with moving pictures and stuff on them
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Gryphon
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« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2009, 04:41:44 am »

Cool!  Then I concur, a good slow-set epoxy is your best bet - make sure to degrease the picks by washing them with detergent, then wiping their backs with acetone or sanding them on the backs to give some tooth or both.  Use the highest-grade, slowest setting epoxy you can find; you can use just a tiny drop of fast-set on one end to tack each one in place and act like a "clamp" while the slow-set cures, but make sure that the rest of the back of each pick is coated with slow-set (the fast-set one minute epoxy will fail in a year or so, sooner if the guitar is used a lot or taken outside in the wintertime often.  The wood will vibrate, expand and contract with changes in heat and humidity and string tension.)

Remember two things, the face of a hollowbody guitar is a sounding board and you will be altering its vibratory characteristics by affixing anything to its surface; and that a brittle glue like epoxy will conduct sound and may add a treble buzz, while a soft glue like silicone will dampen vibration and may cause dead spots.
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The_Steam_Master
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« Reply #6 on: March 17, 2009, 04:49:02 am »

ok, thanks for the in depth message, i hope to post pictures when its complete

thing with the body though, it has electric pickups so i would assume it to be more reliant on the pickups themselves
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Gryphon
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« Reply #7 on: March 18, 2009, 01:50:37 am »

Yes, gluing stuff to the soundboard won't affect the pickups at all.  Everything will work just fine, but you may notice a change in the characteristic "round" sound of a hollowbody - its harmonic qualities are likely to be altered in unpredictable ways.  This isn't necessarily a bad thing.  You may like the new sound better.
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Ancient Tinkerer
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« Reply #8 on: March 18, 2009, 05:28:55 am »

I agree too. I use the 30 minute epoxy for most things. The old hand eye coordination isn't up to setting veneers or carbon fiber exactly in seconds. Longer time = more precise fitment and a chance to grab the clean up cloths before anything sets up.

john
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stockton_joans
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« Reply #9 on: March 18, 2009, 11:42:06 am »

i know this is derailing the topic slightly but what is the best way to clean up excess epoxy befor it sets?
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Gryphon
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« Reply #10 on: March 18, 2009, 07:12:09 pm »

Scrape off any puddles, then scrub the sticky remainder off with acetone on a rag.  Wear rubber gloves and a respirator, and keep an eye peeled so you don't leave sticky fingerprints elsewhere.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2009, 07:14:06 pm by Gryphon » Logged
The_Steam_Master
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« Reply #11 on: April 01, 2009, 12:58:15 pm »

http://brassgoggles.co.uk/bg-forum/index.php?topic=15024.0
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