The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
December 16, 2017, 12:52:26 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Brassgoggles.co.uk - The Lighter Side Of Steampunk, follow @brasstech for forum technical problems & updates.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: First Time Piece  (Read 1340 times)
Gibbtall
Deck Hand
*
Canada Canada


« on: March 04, 2009, 06:55:21 pm »

So, there is a pretty long story behind this, that I'll just link to rather then explain again Tongue

http://gibbtall.deviantart.com/art/Master-of-Time-114721869

The movement is a 15 Jewel Waltham, I'm not sure what other stats you guys go by, but it's serial number is 21575473

I'm currently trying to get it at the correct speed, it's only a like a few seconds an hour fast, but I'm a nazi Tongue It runs perfectly otherwise. I wound it around 3 on monday and it just stopped this morning. Thoough I'm not too sure about it's maximum winding point, how do I know how far to go without breaking it?

The link above explains a few more things too, like the chain I've got it on.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

PS: Thanks for the move, sorry, I didn't see this section ^.^
« Last Edit: March 04, 2009, 09:23:19 pm by Gibbtall » Logged
HAC
Steam Theologian
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Canada Canada


HAC_N800
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2009, 10:46:57 pm »

Nice little Waltham..
  That's a 12 size Grade 220, 3/4 plate, model 1894 with (as you stated, 15 jewels) from a manufacturing run of 2000 watches.  manufacturing date is late 1917 or early 1918.
If its running a few seconds an hour fast, (and it looks as if the regulator is pretty much all the way over), it may need a servicing. When the oils start to dry out, the amplitude (swing of the balance wheel) gets smaller, and that increases the rate, hence the watch runs fast.
   The hinged case is a nice touch, and appears to be in pretty good shape. I see the crystal is acrylic be the slight yellowing (that happens with age). If it really bothers you, a new glass crystal shouldn't be too hard for watchmaker to source..


I'd say you have a keeper there, good movement, nice case and a really clean dial..

Cheers
Harold

Logged

You never know what lonesome is , 'til you get to herdin' cows.
Gibbtall
Deck Hand
*
Canada Canada


« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2009, 12:10:21 am »

Awsome Tongue I'll make sure to save those stats for future refrence. It is in pretty good shape, givin it's almost 100 year old life XD The LARGEST flaw of the whole thing is the fact that the back is in fact missing, the rear door that opens goes directly to the movement, though there used to be another door that I would assume post some sort of engraveing of the owner? It was lost long before even the person that sold it to me recieved it I assume. It seems to stuff be usable though, the rear door is sturdy Smiley

I may at some point, when funds allow, go and get it fully serviced, possibly replaceing the crystal as well.
Logged
Gibbtall
Deck Hand
*
Canada Canada


« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2009, 05:44:34 am »

Sooo, might anyone have any tips on setting the correct time? The only thing I can think of is waiting untill the time on the watch then then winding it up, but that seems impractical. Also, the hour hand seems a tad miss alligned, it's about 20 minutes ahead of where it should be.
Logged
SaintSeptum
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States



« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2009, 10:37:26 pm »

Sooo, might anyone have any tips on setting the correct time? The only thing I can think of is waiting untill the time on the watch then then winding it up, but that seems impractical. Also, the hour hand seems a tad miss alligned, it's about 20 minutes ahead of where it should be.

Usually the crown (bit you use to wind it) will pull out, much like a modern watch, or there'll be a teeny little tab in the neighborhood of the 2-3 on the side of the face. In that case pop it out with a fingernail and turn the crown to set it.

Good luck! Lovely watch btw...
Logged

-St. Septum
______________________
Chief Paranormal Consultant and Crew Chaplain,
<i>Eumenides</i> Exploratory Vessel
Gibbtall
Deck Hand
*
Canada Canada


« Reply #5 on: March 06, 2009, 11:52:29 pm »

Aha!!! Mystary solved! ^.^ Thanks a ton. I hadn't tried pulling the crown OUT Tongue
Logged
Zwack
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States

And introducing the wonderful Irish (Mrs Z).


« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2009, 07:59:28 am »

Glad someone here was able to help...

There are at least four watch setting mechanisms that I am aware of...

Pendant Set (like yours and two of mine) where you pull the crown out and turn it to set it.

Lever set where there is a small lever that needs to be pulled out to set it with the crown http://pocketwatcher.zoovy.com/category/watch_information.settingaleversetwatch/

Pin set where there is a small pin that is pressed in while turning the crown. 

Key Set (usually also Key wind) I have one of these too.  You use a key to wind it and the same key to set it.  In my case the key goes on a square shaft on the front of the hands to set the time.  http://pocketwatcher.zoovy.com/category/watch_information.keywindandkeyset/

I hope that this helps,

Z.
Logged

"At least those oddballs are interesting" - My Wife.
I'm British but living in America.  This might explain my spelling.
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.368 seconds with 16 queries.