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Author Topic: First time modder needs some tips...  (Read 1603 times)
sevenlies
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« on: February 16, 2009, 09:27:07 pm »

~peeks out of the lurkers' corner~

Hello, all!  Last Halloween I put together my first Steampunk ensemble.  Unfortunately doing so has placed me squarely in the realm of "I must make more" and so I am putting together another ensemble for a convention in May.

A friend purchased two of these pistols at a local toy store for me to use as my weapons:

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

I didn't have time to modify them, but they worked in a pinch.  They're actually really lovely; they have a wonderful heft and weight, and are made from quality parts.  However, since I have a few months to play with the new ensemble, I would like to go ahead and modify it.  The black parts - as seen in the picture - are metal; I believe painted steel.  The brown part is wood.  The only plastic part to the gun is the orange tip. 

What I'd like to do is age the wood - I'm thinking this can be done by sanding the paint so it doesn't have a totally uniform look.  The metal, though, is another matter.  I'd like to have it look like tarnished silver.  I figure I could streak on silver paint with a damp sponge so some of the black shows through, and use Rub n' Buff on the raised parts so they'll stand out more.  I really want to remove the orange tip but for safety reasons that might not be a great idea.  Has anyone else dealt with tips on toy guns?

I've seen many a trick on how to make plastic look like aged wood and metal, but not a whole lot on aging actual wood and metal.  Any pointers - here or elsewhere - would be fantastic.  Smiley

Thank you!
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JingleJoe
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« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2009, 09:43:35 pm »

You don't need tips what you said right there sounds great Smiley

Pfft safety? Just rip the plastic right off, you'll probably be fine Wink

Wood; Sanded then stained dark and bashed and sanded and stained again makes for good aged wood Smiley

As for aging the metal I might suggest sanding it and leaving some of the paint on, I did it with these goggles and have done with many other painted black metals, you might agree it gives a nice patina Smiley
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sevenlies
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« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2009, 04:12:24 pm »

JingleJoe, thanks for the ideas about the wood and metal!  I didn't even think about just sanding the paint off of it.  How do you normally sand the paint off?  I'm assuming fine grit sandpaper and a lot of elbow grease...

Please forgive me for what probably seems like inane questions...I'm not a terribly crafty person so this is an entirely new undertaking for me.
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JingleJoe
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« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2009, 05:05:55 pm »

That's okay Smiley any sand paper will do, but if you ask me I'd say just use the cheapest Cheesy Doesnt need alot of elbow grease, a reasonable amount Smiley

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« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2009, 10:38:42 pm »

The metal lock parts are probably some kind of zinc alloy with a baked enamel finish; the barrels are probably either steel or zinc alloy.  You can buff the finish off the high spots and corners with a wire wheel in a drill, or by hand with 400-grit sandpaper (if you use a little water or oil, the paper won't clog.) 

My favorite old-timey wood finish is not for those who are careless and/or unaccustomed to handling chemicals, but it is a beautiful finish:  Aqua Fortis, a mild nitric acid solution with an iron nail dissolved in it.  It is wiped liberally on to a clean piece of wood, then the wood is heated with a hair dryer on high, or a heatgun on low.  When the wood heats, it blooms into a beautiful dark rich red-brown that becomes almost holographic when handrubbed with linseed or tung oil.
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sevenlies
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« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2009, 11:46:49 pm »

The metal lock parts are probably some kind of zinc alloy with a baked enamel finish; the barrels are probably either steel or zinc alloy.  You can buff the finish off the high spots and corners with a wire wheel in a drill, or by hand with 400-grit sandpaper (if you use a little water or oil, the paper won't clog.) 

My favorite old-timey wood finish is not for those who are careless and/or unaccustomed to handling chemicals, but it is a beautiful finish:  Aqua Fortis, a mild nitric acid solution with an iron nail dissolved in it.  It is wiped liberally on to a clean piece of wood, then the wood is heated with a hair dryer on high, or a heatgun on low.  When the wood heats, it blooms into a beautiful dark rich red-brown that becomes almost holographic when handrubbed with linseed or tung oil.

Fantastic ideas.  Thanks for telling me about the sandpaper, I'll definitely try that.  I'm afraid I'm a little too klutzy to try the Aqua Fortis solution, although the results sound gorgeous!
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clockwork creation
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« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2009, 01:04:30 am »

great tips as usualy folks and a nice toy gun to. just dont hot glue cogs on it and your all set  Wink
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« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2009, 05:47:14 am »

Try drybrushing the metal to age it. Paint it a nice shiny silver, then apply a darker grey to the brush. Take some tissue paper and wipe the pain from the brush, then softly brush it over the metal. You should end up with a nice-looking finish.
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sevenlies
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« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2009, 06:17:57 pm »

just dont hot glue cogs on it and your all set  Wink

Haha!  I wasn't planning on it.  Cheesy  The only way I wanted cogs on a gun was if they worked. 

Try drybrushing the metal to age it. Paint it a nice shiny silver, then apply a darker grey to the brush. Take some tissue paper and wipe the pain from the brush, then softly brush it over the metal. You should end up with a nice-looking finish.

Drybrushing...that was the technique I was thinking of.  Thank you!
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