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Author Topic: Master Pocketwatch Thread  (Read 326230 times)
C Agnes Deadlock
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« Reply #100 on: August 07, 2007, 11:16:52 am »

Ok so not just a pocket watch but look at this beauty!  I REALLY REALLY WANT ONE!...



...found at...

http://watchismo.blogspot.com/2007/04/1590-gun-powder-flask-sundial-compass.html


That is one sexy watch, my friend. I've always had a fascination with pocket watches (big shock, right?) and finally bought one that looks remarkably like the first one in this thread. I purchased it in Camden Town and lo and behold, it was a piece of rubbish. But it looks cool, so I keep it. One day I'll probably take it apart for parts. I also have a proper pocket watch that was owned by a great-uncle and of course I can't find the thing now. Pictures of both watches when I find the super nice one.
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Doctor When
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« Reply #101 on: August 09, 2007, 12:11:42 pm »

Of course, everyone needs one of these:

Ultimate Pocket Watch Accessory
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C Agnes Deadlock
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« Reply #102 on: August 09, 2007, 02:08:05 pm »

Yes! Everyone does! That is, indeed, quite spiffy!
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Kabuki
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My physician claims there is something wrong...


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« Reply #103 on: August 10, 2007, 06:35:32 am »

Ha!  What timing!  On a similar note, I have just recently completed rough assembly of my very own pocket watch display.



Please forgive the terrible aetherphone pictures. Yes, those are connecting rods from a 1992 Honda Civic engine.  The wooden base is a plank of Brazilian redwood.  Awesome stuff, it machines like plastic and is hard as oak.  I still need to do some finish work, such as polishing the pipe and rods, and routing the edges of the plank.  But so far, I like the way it has come together.



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C Agnes Deadlock
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« Reply #104 on: August 10, 2007, 05:09:47 pm »

That's lovely. I'm always impressed by people who can make things.
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Kabuki
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My physician claims there is something wrong...


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« Reply #105 on: August 10, 2007, 11:51:56 pm »

Why, thank you, Ms. Deadlock!  Of course, just since I've posted pictures have I conceived of an even more fancy design for the hooks...  We'll see how it turns out.
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Angus D. Murphy
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« Reply #106 on: August 12, 2007, 03:48:28 pm »

Here are mine mine mine...

Three of these were bought in April in an antiques/second-hand shop, as a lot in an old tin box, with some pare parts and broken bits. 30 € for the lot.. Two of them proved to be in working order and I tricked my parents into paying for a slight restoration as a gift for my degree.
The third of these, and the oldest (early 1800s), will be repaired with some of the money from my summer job.

The last is one of my most prized possessions, and is a family heirloom, it belonged to my great-grandfather. A 24 hours dial, and in working order. It was given to me by my grandmother in July last year, for my 21st birthday.

I am still trying to find a way to properly display these.
(only mention inside - I have not dared open the inner part- Cylindre Huit Rubis, no clue as to where it could come from)



This second watch was awarded at a National Shooting Contest in the late 1880s (the watch bears the date 1889)
It was made by Armand Schwob & Frere, in Paris, 19 bd Bonne Nouvelle. The back is decorated - picture to come.



By Blacher, au Pont Douilly




This one bears no information at all and I have been unable to open the inner part, like many people before me, since it bears some scratch marks.


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Major Francis Cleverly
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« Reply #107 on: August 15, 2007, 04:50:38 pm »

Here are mine mine mine...

Those are most impressive!  I especially like the 24h one.
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« Reply #108 on: August 23, 2007, 07:15:43 pm »

I wonder if I might tap the assembled brains? 

I have seen this watch on ebay:



A nice chunky brass piece, just what I'm after, but the name has caused bafflement.  "Brguet" is nonsense.  "Bréguet" is a fantastically-famous watchmaker, inventor of the tourbillon and all sorts.  "Brguet" is, well, "Bréguet" in a typeface with no accented character.  Which makes me think it's a fake.  Fair enough, as it is cheap; but it also looks properly old.  I'm wondering if it's an older - 1950s or so, maybe - fake Bréguet?  Which, fool as I am, is actually interesting enough to be worth buying! 

Can anyone advise?  Or shall I just take a punt and risk it? Smiley
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HAC
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HAC_N800
« Reply #109 on: August 23, 2007, 07:42:59 pm »

Cheap Chinese I'd wager...  (it certainly looks the part)

Cheers
Harold

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« Reply #110 on: August 23, 2007, 08:48:06 pm »

unfortuanatly,in my experience when it comes to pocket watches, you get what you pay for. There are no bargins...
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HAC
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HAC_N800
« Reply #111 on: August 23, 2007, 09:11:17 pm »

Sometimes there are lucky finds... This one was a flea market find, in  a box of old beat up watches and pocket watches (I was after parts)  Upon cleaning up, it turned out to be an 1888 Longibes, with a 14K gold case, and it runs like a champ..... Best $25.00 I ever spent...
Longines verified the manufacture date, and where it was sold from the serial number..








Cheers
Harold
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Major Francis Cleverly
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« Reply #112 on: August 23, 2007, 09:26:47 pm »

HAC, I really like the last one.  The hunter (hope that's the right term) case is most impressive.
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HAC
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« Reply #113 on: August 23, 2007, 09:39:37 pm »

Thanks....it was pretty bad before servicing and cleaning.. (and its lever set, too.)
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Major Francis Cleverly
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« Reply #114 on: August 23, 2007, 10:16:37 pm »

Yeah, it's almost exactly what I'd like to get (for myself).  Although I'd like an older Elgin with a silver (or stainless) hunter case.  There's an 1897 silver open face Elgin at the local antique shop, but it's a little pricey, and it won't "go" so I'm not sure I want to risk hefty repair bills.
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The Infernal Mr Adams
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« Reply #115 on: August 23, 2007, 11:23:19 pm »




Now heres a question, whats the point of the back opening up like that? Is it simply to protect the etching on the outer casing?
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HAC
Steam Theologian
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HAC_N800
« Reply #116 on: August 23, 2007, 11:28:34 pm »

The case back has two hinged lids.. The inner one (dust cover) you see in the second pic, is there to help protect the movement from dust, etc.. It is thinner, but has a tighter seal than the outer case. (its also a nice place for any kind of personalized engraving.

Cheers
Harold
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Maximum Humphries
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« Reply #117 on: August 25, 2007, 10:42:01 am »

Mr HAC, i am humbled by your find, and i withdraw my statement., and with that i'm going to my local flea market with a magnifying glass...
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Prof. Brockworth
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« Reply #118 on: August 25, 2007, 03:16:09 pm »

HAC, you were right about that watch, cheap Chinese or I'm a Dutchman.  Still, cheap means I can use it daily qithout worrying about my precious. Smiley
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HAC
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HAC_N800
« Reply #119 on: August 25, 2007, 03:58:30 pm »

Mr HAC, i am humbled by your find, and i withdraw my statement., and with that i'm going to my local flea market with a magnifying glass...

I suspect it was the gods smiling on me  that day,,, have found nothing worthwhile at the flea markets around here since...
Cheers
Harold
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Easy
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« Reply #120 on: August 28, 2007, 01:08:27 am »

Since my interest in pocketwatches is what really started my interest in Steampunk, I think it would be a good idea to post my watch here. I admire the other watches in this thread, as I am currently unable to purchase a good quality or antique pocketwatch due to lack of funds. However, my $30 WalMart watch has its own flair of sorts. Sorry these are so grainy, I do not own a digital camera, so my computer's built-in camera had to do. It was an awkward proposition, to say the least, taking these pictures.


This is a closeup of the front with the cover closed. I find the design rather fetching, personally.

Back, closeup.

Closeup with the front cover open, face exposed.


Shots a bit farther away, face cover open and closed.

It's not readable in the second shot, but unfortunately the mechanism is Chinese, though it is 17 jewel mechanical. Also, I'm pretty sure it's just a knockoff of the Charles-Hubert watch Herr Döktor already posted in this thread, but one cannot really go wrong for the price. Now I must save for an antique watch in good working order.
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OpheliaButcher
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« Reply #121 on: August 28, 2007, 02:56:19 am »

It's not readable in the second shot, but unfortunately the mechanism is Chinese, though it is 17 jewel mechanical. Also, I'm pretty sure it's just a knockoff of the Charles-Hubert watch Herr Döktor already posted in this thread, but one cannot really go wrong for the price. Now I must save for an antique watch in good working order.

I bought the same watch of ebay some time ago, and the winding spring snapped within a month, it is however really beautiful and I took the movement out and made a lovely necklace out of it.

Just be super careful winding it.
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« Reply #122 on: August 28, 2007, 07:04:18 pm »

I recently found an old pocket watch that belonged to my grandfather, and I thought you all might be interested in seeing it. It's a Hamilton 4992B, manufactured in 1942. During the war Hamilton apparently made around a million of these to be issued to soldiers in all branches. I've seen pictures of some that are 24-hour dials, even. The face may not be the most steampunk-esque, but the movement is absolutely gorgeous. Too bad it's covered by a plain metal back (which I believe isn't even original, based on the serial numbers and its lack of external markings).

For something 65 years old that's been in boxes and drawers for who-knows-how-long, it still runs beautifully. A full wind lasts a bit over fifty hours and it's fast by just twenty seconds a day. I just need to get a new chain for it.

All through high school and for a little bit after I carried pocketwatches, as I've never liked the way wristwatches look on me. I stopped when I finally got a cell phone, though, but with this find I may find another place for the phone and carry this one around with me day-to-day.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/roach/1260001846/"><img src="http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1002/1260001846_80c6bd6837.jpg"></a>

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/roach/1259996878/"><img src="http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1051/1259996878_65c004771f.jpg"></a>
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Major Francis Cleverly
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« Reply #123 on: August 28, 2007, 08:18:56 pm »

Great Pictures!  That is a wonderful movement.  Thanks for posting them.  I love the silver solored watches.  Oh, yeah, the numbers for the seconds are pretty nice as well.
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HAC
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HAC_N800
« Reply #124 on: August 28, 2007, 10:49:39 pm »

The 24 hour dialed versions were known as Navigators, or GCT watches, and were true 24 hour movements...
The 4992B is based on the railroad 992b with mods to accomodate a centre secodns hand instead of the classic
sub-seconds. Thats a great classic watch you have there, and certainly capable of great timekeeping.. Word of advice, don;t drop it, use a chain.. There's no shock protection on the balance... Also, if its been sitting that long, get it serviced, dryed out or no lubrication will damage it in the long run.
 As far as accuracy, my 992b is running to 12 seconds per week, yours should be capable of similar, once adjusted and serviced,

Here's a shot of my 992b movement



and the watch its in (this one's from 1950, and was one of my working watches at CPR)



and here's a 4992b GCT



You really have a great watch there...

Cheers
Harold
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