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Author Topic: Help with aging techniqes  (Read 2656 times)
noreebia
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« on: February 03, 2009, 06:35:21 am »

There is probably a thread for this but I just couldnt find it(weep weep).

The only two I know is putting some shoe polish on the surface to make it look old, or brushing on some black paint and wiping it back off while leaving just some of it behind to giving it an aged look. Are these the only ones people use? Surely there must be more?

I apologize for my ignorance and beg the passing ladies and sirs to contribute some knowledge to this poor bemused man.

ps:the ones I particularly want to know about is metal and plastic.
« Last Edit: February 03, 2009, 06:42:43 am by noreebia » Logged
Zer0
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« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2009, 06:40:21 am »

For paper I have been holding a cheap lighter under a page a foot or so. This doesn't burn the paper but the unburnt oil floats up with the heat and deposits on the page. Very sooty grimy look. The distance from flame varies with paper, lighter, fuel, and desired look. Experiment and keep a bucket of water handy.
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Sinjun
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« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2009, 02:37:06 am »

According to http://www.military-steel-helmets-and-decals.com/decal_and_helmet_aging_tips.htm :

"Aging Metal Parts:
    To make new steel or brass parts look old, you can use this formulae:
(2) oz. Lemon or Lime juice
(2) oz. Chlorine bleach
(2) oz. Vinegar
(1) Tablespoon of salt

Mix well, and immerse parts in the solution for 30 minutes or longer, depending on how much you want to accelerate the oxidization. When you have the desired amount of oxidization, rub with steel wool."

I myself make no warranty of this method, however.
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noreebia
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« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2009, 07:03:41 am »

Thank you, sir ZerO and Sinjun for the replies. I might have to try that...
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malakiBlunt
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« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2009, 02:27:01 pm »

The classic one for paper is use black Tea, obviously dont do it after writing on it with water based ink!
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Tyren
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« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2009, 07:30:57 am »

I am in dire need of this for the copper I plan on using on my gun. It just looks too shiny and new...
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« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2009, 11:31:12 pm »

Copper? I know urin works (history class)
Try to avoid acids, I'm pretty sure that'll shine 'em up more.
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« Reply #7 on: February 17, 2009, 12:21:51 am »

Patience.
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noreebia
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« Reply #8 on: February 17, 2009, 03:06:10 pm »

Patience.
I have waited a few eons for it, and it's still not happening! Maybe just a few more millenniums...?
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Danbury Shakes
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« Reply #9 on: February 17, 2009, 04:23:02 pm »

Copper? I know urin works (history class)


That'll be the amonia

Treating copper with half and half vinegar and household amonia will age it (but it takes a bit time) - should get blueish/greenish verdigri in a couple of days.

Adding some ammonium chloride and table salt can help.

remember any chemical can be dangerous so make sure you wear gloves and GOGGLES



Heat treating copper can build up a nice red colour - but you have to be handy with a blow lamp for that.  you also have to seal it once you have the colour as it will continue to oxidise and loose the redness.


p.s.

have a look here http://sewphisticate.blogspot.com/2008/04/copper-patinas.html
« Last Edit: February 17, 2009, 04:25:51 pm by misterwobbley » Logged

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Tyren
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« Reply #10 on: February 17, 2009, 04:36:40 pm »

Well I don't want to age it to the poiint where it looks like lady liberty. Just wanted to make it so it doesn't look like it came fresh out of the plant. Do you have to soak it in the solution, just rub it on, anything in paticular?
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Danbury Shakes
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« Reply #11 on: February 17, 2009, 05:03:17 pm »

Well I don't want to age it to the poiint where it looks like lady liberty. Just wanted to make it so it doesn't look like it came fresh out of the plant. Do you have to soak it in the solution, just rub it on, anything in paticular?

The heat patination method causes copper oxides to form - Red oxides ( Cu2O ) and Black Oxides ( CuO ),  Heating the red oxide will let it decompose to black.

i.e the longer you heat the copper the darker it will go.



Using the different solutions result in buildup of (i think) copper sulphate/copper chloride which  have a blue/green colour - hence the verdigris.

Suspending the copper above the solution lets the vapour react with the copper.  Some oxidisation will also occur.

The longer you leave it, the older it looks.  Keep checking till it gets to the colour you want then coat with beeswax or a clear vernish.

Another way is to put sone sawdust in a plastic bag and pour the liquid on that then seal the copper in the bag.

Rubbing off some of the patina in the places you would normally get wear (ends or barrels, corners, hand grips etc) can give a nice contrast to the aged areas.
« Last Edit: February 17, 2009, 05:15:28 pm by misterwobbley » Logged
Tyren
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« Reply #12 on: February 18, 2009, 02:16:17 am »

Do you kow if this has any affect on the copper? Like structurally? Because while I want to age it (think I'm gonna try the heat method first the reds and blacks are more the direction I was going) but I definately have to do it before I attach it to the framework of the gun. And I don't want to try to shape it and attach it if the aging process suddenly makes it brittle. I might have to try to do some prefab and then once its in the proper shape I can age it. No sure how thats going to work...
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Danbury Shakes
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« Reply #13 on: February 18, 2009, 04:37:30 am »

Do you kow if this has any affect on the copper? Like structurally? Because while I want to age it (think I'm gonna try the heat method first the reds and blacks are more the direction I was going) but I definately have to do it before I attach it to the framework of the gun. And I don't want to try to shape it and attach it if the aging process suddenly makes it brittle. I might have to try to do some prefab and then once its in the proper shape I can age it. No sure how thats going to work...

The solution is just a surface treatment and wont effect the structure of the metal.

Heat treating the copper with more likely than not anneal the metal, which rather than making it brittle would actually make it easier to shape (Shaping metal work hardens it and can couse metal to become brittle - annealing it makes it easier to work and stops it being brittle)
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Tyren
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« Reply #14 on: February 18, 2009, 04:47:43 am »

The solution is just a surface treatment and wont effect the structure of the metal.

Heat treating the copper with more likely than not anneal the metal, which rather than making it brittle would actually make it easier to shape (Shaping metal work hardens it and can couse metal to become brittle - annealing it makes it easier to work and stops it being brittle)
Sounds like a plan. Think I'll hammer it out some, perhaps before perhaps after, but give it a bit more of that hand worked look. Thank you very much though, you've been incredibly helpful. I know I'm going to definately work a few smaller pieces first to try out what works and what doesn't. I'd be using copper for the structure of the gun itself if I had a blow torch but I was stuck using pvc for the guts. So I'm just using what metal I can. Was going to reinforce the frame and band some of the parts with what i have.
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Danbury Shakes
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« Reply #15 on: February 18, 2009, 05:04:06 am »

Glad to be of help.
Can't wait to see what you're building and how it turns out.

Google "copper patination" might bring up more info if you need it
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Tyren
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« Reply #16 on: February 18, 2009, 05:21:55 am »

Glad to be of help.
Can't wait to see what you're building and how it turns out.

Google "copper patination" might bring up more info if you need it
Hope you don't have to wait too long. I should be able to do some more work on thursday seeing as I just finished grinding tests for like a week. Also I have a topic under tactile and you can see where I am so far. So far I'm at the "it works but it looks horible" stage.
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