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Author Topic: I've picked up these awesome brass lights, but they have been painted!  (Read 4722 times)
Gomez Falcone
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« Reply #25 on: February 02, 2009, 09:21:53 pm »

Another possibility- depending on the paint would be to use some good automotive brake cleaner.  It can be purchased in aerosol cans for around $3-$4.  If the paint is fairly thin and was sprayed on this product should remove it pretty easily.  I've used it to take graffiti off of walls and it does so fairly easily. 
Like the others have said a good toothbrush to clean the crevices followed by a rinse would probably do the trick.

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jringling
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« Reply #26 on: February 02, 2009, 09:40:32 pm »

Another possibility- depending on the paint would be to use some good automotive brake cleaner.  It can be purchased in aerosol cans for around $3-$4.  If the paint is fairly thin and was sprayed on this product should remove it pretty easily.  I've used it to take graffiti off of walls and it does so fairly easily. 
Like the others have said a good toothbrush to clean the crevices followed by a rinse would probably do the trick.


Brake cleaner is good, but not as good as it was 5-6 years ago. I think they stopped using methylene chloride, which is THE solvent to use. If you don't mind using a solvent, MEK works better than acetone, but it evaporates faster and really dries out your skin...

Gloves? Who needs gloves?   Grin
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elliot
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« Reply #27 on: February 02, 2009, 10:09:17 pm »

Methyl Ethyl Keytone (MEK) is monster bad. 
It should be used only by pros and even then- sparingly.
I used it for years and, well.... never again.

You really need to consider the nature of the project at hand.
If this is a simple home-style craft project, 
then by all means stick to simple and safe procedures. 

Chemical baths, MEK, dangerous solvents, sand blasting, etc are wholly inappropriate
for this particular project.
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Beatrice VonFalon
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« Reply #28 on: February 03, 2009, 05:09:19 am »

wow i didn't think there was this many ways to removed paint!

i went to the paint store and picked up this stuff called Smart Strip. It's environmentally friendly! Smiley

anyways, it can apparently removed up to 15 layers of paint, and won't kill me, or cause me to go blind haha.

So I'm going to try this, and if it doesn't work, I'll have to try something else.

I will keep you all updated on my progress! haha

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von Corax
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« Reply #29 on: February 03, 2009, 05:22:27 am »

I have used an electrolytic tank for de-rusting in the past. Same set up as etching, but switch the +  and -, and use a baking soda (calcium carbonate) solution, 1 box per 2 gallons of water.

I hope you're not baking with calcium carbonate, 'cause, that's limestone. (Bet'cha wondered why people say your bread is "like bricks...") Baking soda is, of course, sodium hydrogen carbonate, aka. sodium bicarbonate.

As for stripping paint, I believe model railroaders often use warm brake fluid to strip factory paint from polystyrene models, so it shouldn't be too hard on brass.
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jringling
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« Reply #30 on: February 03, 2009, 11:28:33 am »

I have used an electrolytic tank for de-rusting in the past. Same set up as etching, but switch the +  and -, and use a baking soda (calcium carbonate) solution, 1 box per 2 gallons of water.

I hope you're not baking with calcium carbonate, 'cause, that's limestone. (Bet'cha wondered why people say your bread is "like bricks...") Baking soda is, of course, sodium hydrogen carbonate, aka. sodium bicarbonate.

As for stripping paint, I believe model railroaders often use warm brake fluid to strip factory paint from polystyrene models, so it shouldn't be too hard on brass.

Sorry, I started with using baking soda, but moved onto using calcium carbonate which could be cheaply obtained through the laboratory I worked at.....
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OldProfessorBear
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« Reply #31 on: February 03, 2009, 02:02:32 pm »

I have used an electrolytic tank for de-rusting in the past. Same set up as etching, but switch the +  and -, and use a baking soda (calcium carbonate) solution, 1 box per 2 gallons of water.

I hope you're not baking with calcium carbonate, 'cause, that's limestone. (Bet'cha wondered why people say your bread is "like bricks...") Baking soda is, of course, sodium hydrogen carbonate, aka. sodium bicarbonate.

As for stripping paint, I believe model railroaders often use warm brake fluid to strip factory paint from polystyrene models, so it shouldn't be too hard on brass.

Yes, brake fluid (room temperature works fine) does an excellent job of removing paint from plastic models. Just leave it in there for a few days and the paint comes right off, mostly. Use a toothbrush to get it out of the details. Water wash it afterwards. I don't see how anything in there could harm brass. And it's not particularly volatile or evil-smelling. Probably is toxic, however.

« Last Edit: February 03, 2009, 02:05:11 pm by OldProfessorBear » Logged

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von Corax
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« Reply #32 on: February 04, 2009, 04:09:09 am »

I have used an electrolytic tank for de-rusting in the past. Same set up as etching, but switch the +  and -, and use a baking soda (calcium carbonate) solution, 1 box per 2 gallons of water.

I hope you're not baking with calcium carbonate, 'cause, that's limestone. (Bet'cha wondered why people say your bread is "like bricks...") Baking soda is, of course, sodium hydrogen carbonate, aka. sodium bicarbonate.

Sorry, I started with using baking soda, but moved onto using calcium carbonate which could be cheaply obtained through the laboratory I worked at.....

You sure it's not sodium carbonate (washing soda)? I'm not trying to be a prick – if it works, I've a few things I could use it on. It's just that calcium carbonate, as I said, is limestone, and I can't picture limestone being anywhere near soluble enough to use as electroyte. (If it were, Niagara Falls would probably be in Manitoba by now. Tongue )
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jringling
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« Reply #33 on: February 04, 2009, 12:05:10 pm »

I know it was a calcium compound, so it was probably calcium bicarbonate, as I do not remember having any disolving issues. I know calcium carbonate will disolve in a solution with a pH of less than 5, but I do not remember having to adjust the pH in my tank.
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von Corax
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« Reply #34 on: February 05, 2009, 02:33:04 am »

Maybe calcium chloride? We use a calcium chloride solution as ballast in tractor tires, and it should be about as polar a compound as sodium chloride.
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Sk1n
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« Reply #35 on: February 05, 2009, 04:19:56 pm »

Can't really say anything about what to use that hasn't been suggested already, but wanted to remind you that when testing the product you are going to use in said paint removal, test it first somewhere on the item where it will not be noticeable in case you don't get the desired effect.
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Dr Flonker
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« Reply #36 on: February 07, 2009, 01:26:58 am »

Brake fluid to remove paint.

Interesting.  I never thought of that.  Thanks.
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Danbury Shakes
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« Reply #37 on: February 07, 2009, 01:32:57 am »

Brake fluid to remove paint.

Interesting.  I never thought of that.  Thanks.

Tends to be alot more friendly than commercial paint strippers on plastics.  Used it on occasions to strip toy model soldiers
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Captain Thaddeus Crunch
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« Reply #38 on: February 13, 2009, 09:46:19 pm »

I am, at this very moment, immersing a pair of poorly painted copper sconces in a vat of "Pine-Sol".  These specimens had what appeared to be a layer of black acrylic primer underneath a clumsy and inexpert acylic job of verdigris.  As a matter of fact I believed them to be formed of aluminum.  That is, until I dropped one and a scratch revealed the hue and shine of copper!

They have been bathing in my solution since this Monday last.  It wasn't until Wednesday that the paint began to yeild, however only the thinnest layers were released.  Scrubbing with a pot scrubber served to clear off a fair amount of the loose paint.  I returned the two to their immersion and repeated the scrubbing yesterday.  It seems that the various pits and crevases of the metal are going to hold their burden of paint and that I will have to resort to abrasives to bring about a shine. 

As the resulting forms are due to be cut apart to become part of a matched pair of rather agressive ray projectors I have not yet decided if the final look is to be something on the order of Factory New or long time in the field.

I will continue to report my success or failures in this de-acrylicing of copper in the hopes that it may be of some use to others.
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Beatrice VonFalon
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« Reply #39 on: June 20, 2009, 06:45:35 am »

i have done it!

all that god-awful paint is gone, and beautiful brass lights are not in my room.

i will post pictures soon!
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