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Author Topic: I've picked up these awesome brass lights, but they have been painted!  (Read 4750 times)
Beatrice VonFalon
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The Green Dungeon Alchemist's Apprentice


« on: February 01, 2009, 08:37:56 pm »

I was wondering, should i try to paint them over again, to look brassy, or what's the best way to remove the paint on them, without damaging them.

I read the link of how to paint something to look brass, but I'm not sure if this is what i should do.

Here are the lights Cheesy




« Last Edit: February 01, 2009, 08:48:01 pm by Beatrice VonFalon » Logged
jringling
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« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2009, 08:50:56 pm »

First, pictures?

Second, can you take it apart enough to soak it in acatone safely?
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Beatrice VonFalon
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« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2009, 09:00:04 pm »

yes first pictures.

and no they cannot be taken apart Sad
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jringling
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« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2009, 09:15:40 pm »

I have used spray-on paint removers in the past, sold for graffitti removal. Or you could use a paste product and a toothbrush. Either way, I would remove the paint. Why try to paint it to look like brass, when it is brass?
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Beatrice VonFalon
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« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2009, 09:17:49 pm »

it's going to be hard to remove the paint in all the little crevices.
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Reverend Redmond Farrier
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« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2009, 09:20:35 pm »

Very nice find there!  I agree about using paint stripper.  You just have to be careful not to get it on your skin.  Trust the voice of experience, it is not pleasant! lol  It may take a good bit of work to get it out of the crevices, but if there is brass under there it should be worth it.

Rev. R. Farrier
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Beatrice VonFalon
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The Green Dungeon Alchemist's Apprentice


« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2009, 09:26:40 pm »

there is indeed brassss!!!!

what if i were to sand then wax?
« Last Edit: February 01, 2009, 09:28:38 pm by Beatrice VonFalon » Logged
Reverend Redmond Farrier
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« Reply #7 on: February 01, 2009, 09:31:46 pm »

Sanding would remove the paint and do so quickly, but it would also scratch up the brass something terrible and it would be even more difficult to get into the little nooks and crannies.

Rev. R. Farrier
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Beatrice VonFalon
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The Green Dungeon Alchemist's Apprentice


« Reply #8 on: February 01, 2009, 09:47:31 pm »

Thank you.


It makes me sad that someone would paint these beautiful lights!

Especially GOLD!
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The_Steam_Master
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« Reply #9 on: February 01, 2009, 09:51:19 pm »

some people dont see true beauty of all that is brass
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jringling
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« Reply #10 on: February 01, 2009, 10:04:23 pm »

To get into the tight spaces, use a good stiff brush and LOTS of toothpicks. If you have one, use an aircompressor to blow the stripped paint out of the little spaces. I do think the effort will be worth it once you see it finished.
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Beatrice VonFalon
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The Green Dungeon Alchemist's Apprentice


« Reply #11 on: February 01, 2009, 10:10:54 pm »

Thanks a lot!

i've never had to strip paint before.. as you can tell.. and these are such beautiful pieces i can't stand to leave them painted gold!!
« Last Edit: February 01, 2009, 11:25:54 pm by Beatrice VonFalon » Logged
Propnomicon
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« Reply #12 on: February 02, 2009, 12:44:01 am »

Drop it in a bucket filled with PineSol and wait a week.  The paint will dissolve and  your house will smell piney fresh.
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scarrmrcc
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« Reply #13 on: February 02, 2009, 01:32:16 am »

BUT!!!

perhaps the paint left over in the crevices would add an aged look to it?

personally i would say start with the acetone.

see what you get after that (and show pics)

you might be surprised.

if you then want to get the crevices clean... well all th big stuff would be gone by that point.  either way the paint remover is the best way to start.
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Redmund Playfoot
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« Reply #14 on: February 02, 2009, 01:35:55 am »

paint remover and a soft toothbrush for the crevices mayhaps?
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Ben Franklin's Electric Kite
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Rex Libris


« Reply #15 on: February 02, 2009, 01:38:52 am »

Heat, perhaps? You will probably want to re-wire them anyway, and it doesn't require enormous heat to peel paint from metal.
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Schizo
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« Reply #16 on: February 02, 2009, 02:29:45 am »

If you had a friend that had a syphon fed sand blaster you could use baking soda as a light abrasive and blast them I suppose. That should get to all the nooks and crannies but I would test it on some other brass first to make sure it wouldn't hurt it. Just a theory mind you, I've read it done before on some small motorcycle projects. Also the baking soda can just be washed away no worry about spraying any silicates around.
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Tommy Thumbscrew
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« Reply #17 on: February 02, 2009, 03:13:06 am »

As long as there's no plastic to damage, soaking in acetone should work just fine.  You will have to scrub the crevices to remove paint in the cracks, but it should work.  You can lay them in a pan and just do one side at a time if you don't want to use so much acetone, but be aware that the larger the surface area of your "pond", the faster the acetone will evaporate.  Also, as the acetone does its work, it will steadily lose effectiveness, so you may have to drain and re-fill your pond if you use this method.

Most of the foaming or gooey chemical paint strippers will be safe on brass, but you may want to try them first on the inside surface, or somewhere that won't show too much in case you have an adverse reaction that pits/corrodes the surface.

Once you've cleaned them all up and polished them a bit, you could clear-coat them if you're worried about future oxidation.  Personally, I prefer a bit of patina on my brass, silver, pewter and nickel-plated parts.

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Lock
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Don't laugh Madam. Your daughter may be aboard.


« Reply #18 on: February 02, 2009, 04:48:31 am »

Nice find. Can't help you w/the refinish but the motifs are interesting... Maybe faux, but the three feathers look French and the dolphin is entirely nautical.
tks
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alfa1
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« Reply #19 on: February 02, 2009, 08:24:41 am »

Soak in brake fluid, then remove what little paint remains with a toothbrush.


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maduncle
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« Reply #20 on: February 02, 2009, 02:33:27 pm »

Soak in brake fluid, then remove what little paint remains with a toothbrush.




Works a treat!

I have not tried molasses on brass yet but it does an amazing job of removing rust (and any paint) from metal.

Four parts hot water to one part molasses in a bucket. leave to ferment for a day or two. Submerge part to be stripped and check twice a day (leave it too long and the metal starts to get eaten away).

This old molasses trick is used by car restorers to clean old parts.
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jringling
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« Reply #21 on: February 02, 2009, 02:37:45 pm »

Wait... molasses or brake fluid?
molasses, as in the sugar goo? will eat metal?
 Huh
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maduncle
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« Reply #22 on: February 02, 2009, 02:52:18 pm »

Wait... molasses or brake fluid?
molasses, as in the sugar goo? will eat metal?
 Huh



Brake fluid will work on paint.

Molasses (as in the sugar goo) will eat paint and particularly rust and eat metal if left in the goo too long.

http://virtualindian.org/projrust.htm#molasses

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jringling
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« Reply #23 on: February 02, 2009, 03:08:03 pm »

hmmm... Molasses..... I will have to try this on something.

I have used an electrolytic tank for de-rusting in the past. Same set up as etching, but switch the +  and -, and use a baking soda (calcium carbonate) solution, 1 box per 2 gallons of water. The electrolytic process reverses the "rusting" reaction and actually plates new steel (well, iron) to the piece. As with the molasses trick (or any stripping technique) the piece must be quickly rinsed  and covered to prevent flash rusting. I would just wipe everything down and paint with a good primer.
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elliot
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« Reply #24 on: February 02, 2009, 06:40:14 pm »

Greta find!

I, personally,  am always hesitant to remove paint is such a detailed piece as this.
Paint strippers are awful to use and I try to use an alternative method if possible.

If this lamp were mine,  I would do the following:

I would spray paint it matte black. After fully dry, I would use sandpaper, (probably starting with a 120 grit)
and start removing the black paint AND the gold paint underneath.
Maybe one of those sandpaper/sponge things would be good to use!

I would then go to higher grits:  220 and then 400. 
This will polish the brass and the crevices (or low relief) areas will still have black paint
making a nice "antique" kind of look.

The effect should be convincing.  Also you don't have to worry about chemicals or taking the lamp apart and re-wiring it.

Hope this helps.

best Regards,  Art Donovan
,
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