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Author Topic: Making paper look old  (Read 3839 times)
maduncle
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« on: January 16, 2009, 09:54:53 am »

I have been asked by Rowan to post this as a 'how to' following the old label I made for the elShoggotho care package.

Silas HarridenMD created a fantastic label using his computer graphic alchemy skills. Before I placed said label onto the old suitcase, I decided to try and 'age it up' a bit.

Here is how I did it.



Here is the label in untouched form from the colour copier (baking tray used for contrast).



First thing I did was brew some tea - a nice strong English Breakfast brew (tea of choice). I then sponged the tea brew over the print, being careful not to drag in case the ink ran.



After sponging, I then used the scourer side ofthe sponge to drag away some of the wet paper edges and give the label the scuffed worn look.



End result, a faded yellowing label with scuffed edges. I glued it to the old leather suitcase using spray adhesive, making sure to rub down the edges.

Tips:

Use tea - not coffee. I have used coffee in the past and whilst it may produce a similar colour effect, the stale coffee smell never leaves the paper. Tea does not leave a smell.

Make sure the label is well and truly dry before sticking down. It will crinkle and buckle nicely as it dries.

Don't be afraid to remove parts of the inside area of a label for effect - the older and more scuffed it looks the better!
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« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2009, 12:11:32 pm »

Great how to!
Now to get my damn printer working...lol
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Rowan of Rin
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« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2009, 01:55:04 pm »

Very nice maduncle, looks great Smiley

Another very good tutorial on paper ageing is this one, written by the very talented Tiffany of Curious Goods. Well worth a look (and have a poke around the rest of the site while you are at it!).
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« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2009, 03:34:02 am »

very good tutorial Grin quite easy to follow and quite informative

I have an addition if I may. I found you can add a light wash of brown watercolor paint to enhance the effect. it looks rather nice on corners and edges before you scrub them off. Also if you take some dry watercolor and crush it into a powder and sprinkle it onto the damp paper very lightly you get a neat blotching effect.
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alfa1
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« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2009, 03:14:51 pm »

One also supposes that if one has the idea that they might need something like this in the future, to now hang a sheet of paper where it gets a lot of exposure to sunlight.

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The Emblasochist
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« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2009, 05:03:29 am »

I have also heard that using lemon juice could produce much the same effect as the tea does for the coloring effect.  I myself have not tried this technique and wondered whether you might have.  Also, I really think that the use of the sponge to roughen the paper itself is pretty nifty.  I wouldn't have thought of that. 
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Fiereci
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« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2009, 10:43:44 pm »

Ah, thank you so much for this useful tutorial! I already knew this could be done by using tea and coffee, however, the technique of doing it is new to me.. many thanks!
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Havelock Oliphant
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« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2009, 11:22:45 pm »

Good post i was just in the process of using coffee and i was glad that i spotted this post. Thanks a million.
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Miss Aetherly
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« Reply #8 on: January 25, 2009, 12:02:41 am »

Very nice tutorial, especially good to know it will work for inkjet printed pages.

I have also heard that using lemon juice could produce much the same effect as the tea does for the coloring effect.  I myself have not tried this technique and wondered whether you might have.  Also, I really think that the use of the sponge to roughen the paper itself is pretty nifty.  I wouldn't have thought of that. 
I've used the lemon juice method. The problem is that the browning doesn't occur after its dried or heat has been applied. So it's harder to control the level of browning since you can't see it until after the damage is done.

I think I prefer the tea option.
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elShoggotho
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« Reply #9 on: January 25, 2009, 12:07:05 am »

Too bad I had to remove it from the suitcase, but it's neatly rolled up and put away. Oh, and I repaired some superficial damage of the case. It's my standard suitcase for now.
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Luella Dobson
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« Reply #10 on: January 25, 2009, 08:04:34 am »

another way of aging paper, and I've done this: hold it over your stove.

this only works if it's a gas stove to my knowledge and it takes practice to get right. of course, sometimes your edges will alight...
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Fiereci
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« Reply #11 on: January 25, 2009, 10:07:37 am »

I think strong dark coffee works better than tea, the colouring effect is much much stronger.
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vt13013
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« Reply #12 on: January 26, 2009, 04:15:34 am »

I think strong dark coffee works better than tea, the colouring effect is much much stronger.

The problem with coloring with coffee are the oils in it. You can see an example of them if you leave a cup to get cold and see a little slick on top. The oils will go rancid and cause the item to have a peculiar scent over time. I found this out the difficult way when I used coffee to dye a costume piece to make it look aged and dirty.

Cheers.

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von Corax
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« Reply #13 on: January 26, 2009, 06:02:49 am »

I think strong dark coffee works better than tea, the colouring effect is much much stronger.

The problem with coloring with coffee are the oils in it. You can see an example of them if you leave a cup to get cold and see a little slick on top. The oils will go rancid and cause the item to have a peculiar scent over time. I found this out the difficult way when I used coffee to dye a costume piece to make it look aged and dirty.

Cheers.



A short anecdote: For thirty years, my father had a small practice as a consulting civil engineer. In his office he had two concrete-lined fireproof filing cabinets. He retired several decades ago, but to this day the lining of those filing cabinets retains a faint odour of stale coffee — and that's just from having been in the same room. For a document which had been moistened with the coffee, I'm sure the effect would be far more pronounced.
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Fiereci
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« Reply #14 on: January 26, 2009, 11:43:56 am »

I think strong dark coffee works better than tea, the colouring effect is much much stronger.

The problem with coloring with coffee are the oils in it. You can see an example of them if you leave a cup to get cold and see a little slick on top. The oils will go rancid and cause the item to have a peculiar scent over time. I found this out the difficult way when I used coffee to dye a costume piece to make it look aged and dirty.

Cheers.



I see.. but it depends what you use it on I guess. When using it on paper, it doesn't really matter.
It's true that the paper I dyed a few months ago, got a strange smell when aged with coffee, however, I use pastels very intensively, and in order to stop smudging, I use hairspray to cover it up. The hairspray itself has a very strong smell, that eliminates any coffee smell. So, for me, coffee doesn't really matter!
However with clothing, that's a thing apart.. in that case it'd be indeed better to dye it with tea.
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