The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
October 18, 2017, 06:30:50 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Support BrassGoggles! Donate once or $3/mo.
 See details here.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: The Corpus Clock, Cambridge  (Read 5453 times)
Angel
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Chrome dome, goggles on, dressed all in rubber...


« on: January 13, 2009, 03:16:17 pm »

This thing is crazy.





http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corpus_Clock


It's ugly as sin, but damned if that's not a fantastic design.

I had the pleasure of seeing it in person a couple of weeks ago (one of my friends is in her first year at Cambridge and just so happens to be part of Corpus Christi college, so I visited it when I visited her  Tongue).
Logged

"With a rifle, you can kill one man; but with a machine gun, you can make a whole army keep its head down." - Jeremy Clarkson

Buns are obviously not designed for their aerodynamic properties.
Republic Defender
Gunner
**
United States United States

Wait for it...


WWW
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2009, 07:35:49 pm »

Very cool, but some how very freaky at the same time. I like the chronopagh beast, eating the seconds. Cheesy
Logged

"Let us speak courteously, deal fairly, and keep ourselves armed and ready."
— Theodore Roosevelt
http://manoftherepublic.blogspot.com/  and the Forge: http://therepublicforge.blogspot.com/
Rowan of Rin
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Australia Australia

~The Black Blood Alchemist~


« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2009, 12:55:09 am »

Great design, I love the chronophage, and the fact that is is mechanical.
Logged

I'm as mad as I am, but no madder!
Live in Victoria? Check out the Victoria Meet Up Thread!
NazT
Guest
« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2009, 09:31:18 am »

Very cool but I dont like the actual time bit and would prefer a proper clock mechanism....
Logged
Alex JR
Deck Hand
*
Australia Australia


« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2009, 03:48:40 pm »

Wow, my god :0

Especially: "the rippling gold-plated dial was made by exploding a thin sheet of stainless steel onto a mould underwater . . . [at] a secret military research institute in Holland."

Thanks for posting it Smiley
Logged
rogue_designer
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


clockwork gypsy


« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2009, 05:59:07 pm »

Very cool but I dont like the actual time bit and would prefer a proper clock mechanism....

It's about as proper a clock mechanism as you can get - the Grasshopper escapement was Harrison's breakthrough, and it is used to great, very literal, effect here.

The lights are not electronics moving around, it's a mechanical aperture that is geared to move in relation to the lights behind it.

Quite a nice mix of traditional methods, novel mechanics, and sculpture.
Logged

Catapultam habeo. Nisi pecuniam omnem mihi dabis, ad caput tuum saxum immane mittam.
(Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes. But deserve a nice glass of absinthe. I have some Montemarte in the cabinet, if you wish.)
HAC
Steam Theologian
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Canada Canada


HAC_N800
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2009, 06:05:42 pm »

Very cool but I dont like the actual time bit and would prefer a proper clock mechanism....
The Corpus clock uses on an old design called a "grasshopper escapement", which dates from 1772, and was invented by master clockmaker John Harrison, who used it in his revolutionary marine chronometers. SO, not only is it a "proper clock mechanism", its a historically important one, being one  of the first truly low friction escapements. Advantages of the grasshopper escapement are its regularity of operation and its lack of need for lubrication. The regularity of its operation is inherent in its design. One pallet is released only by the engagement of the other,  the impulse given to the pendulum is uniform in both power and timing. He later used the results and observations from this design to develop his gridiron pendulum.
 I do believe that the artistic design  of this clock was inspired by the name of the escapement, in that the sculpture on top actually is a grasshopper escapement mechanism.

Cheers
Harold
Logged

You never know what lonesome is , 'til you get to herdin' cows.
NazT
Guest
« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2009, 10:18:00 am »

Hmmm ok perhaps I should have put it better, I dont like the lights or the front and would prefer to see the actual (more accurate than proper) mechanism...  Grin  I love the beastie on the top and would prefer something more in keeping with that as the actual clock face...   Smiley
Logged
HAC
Steam Theologian
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Canada Canada


HAC_N800
« Reply #8 on: January 15, 2009, 07:02:48 pm »

The "beastie", actually is the escapement that controls the clock, quite the feat of building...

Cheers
Harold
Logged
Ben Franklin's Electric Kite
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Rex Libris


« Reply #9 on: January 15, 2009, 10:37:23 pm »

I do not find it ugly, but rather, beautiful.
Logged
NazT
Guest
« Reply #10 on: January 15, 2009, 10:38:22 pm »

The "beastie", actually is the escapement that controls the clock, quite the feat of building...

Just as a matter of interest would it have been more difficult to have made this escapement than say a good quality pocketwatch HAC?  Or is the complexity, in this case, with the size itself?
Logged
HAC
Steam Theologian
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Canada Canada


HAC_N800
« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2009, 01:43:24 am »

The grasshopper escapment is a low beat escapement, pendulum driven. Its a lot less complex in design than the typical high-beat lever escapements you see in a typical pocket watch.
The grasshopper escapment works like this:



and runs at 1 beat per second in a clock, as seen in this video..



John  Harris used a double grasshopper in his H1 chronomter that was quite resistant to movement, vibration and positional error.
Here's a video of a replica H1:



The lever escapement in a pocket watch is more complicated, and runs at a rate of anywhere from 3-5 beats per second, as in the German video of the balance and escapment of a Unitsa 6497 (which is a common modern pocket watch movement.




Cheers
Harold

Logged
rogue_designer
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


clockwork gypsy


« Reply #12 on: January 17, 2009, 01:48:39 am »

And again, regardless of its complexity (or simplicity), the use of this particular escapement (in honor of Harrison) was the whole point.

I like this version of the graphic for understanding how it works, personally.



Logged
HAC
Steam Theologian
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Canada Canada


HAC_N800
« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2009, 03:51:55 am »

And again, regardless of its complexity (or simplicity), the use of this particular escapement (in honor of Harrison) was the whole point.

Sometimes Occam's Razor works for movements too... Grin  The grasshopper is one of the lowest friction movements ever made.. Harrison's use of this escapement with the pendulum replaced by a balance spring with two 5 pound weights was pure genius. The H1 had an accuracy of 3 seocnds per 24 hours while at sea, ungeard of accuracy in that time.  H2 was essentially the same, save for the addition of a remontoire for improved isochronism .

AND, they looked a treat, too...

Cheers
Harold
Logged
rogue_designer
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


clockwork gypsy


« Reply #14 on: January 19, 2009, 06:21:44 pm »

The H1 had an accuracy of 3 seocnds per 24 hours while at sea, ungeard of accuracy in that time.  H2 was essentially the same, save for the addition of a remontoire for improved isochronism .

AND, they looked a treat, too...



Yes they did. I wouldn't mind having a replica H1 in my study. Smiley


Logged
NazT
Guest
« Reply #15 on: January 20, 2009, 09:31:54 am »

Yes they did. I wouldn't mind having a replica H1 in my study. Smiley




Now there you go!!!  You can see ALL of the workings in their glory!  Stunning... Smiley 
Logged
GypsyGurl
Officer
***
Australia Australia


A Dancer with Steampunk tendencies...


WWW
« Reply #16 on: January 21, 2009, 12:48:43 pm »

The grasshopper escapment is a low beat escapement, pendulum driven. Its a lot less complex in design than the typical high-beat lever escapements you see in a typical pocket watch.
The grasshopper escapment works like this:

and runs at 1 beat per second in a clock, as seen in this video..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lDJvzg3J1mM

John  Harris used a double grasshopper in his H1 chronomter that was quite resistant to movement, vibration and positional error.
Here's a video of a replica H1:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nJRa7vZqHJo


The lever escapement in a pocket watch is more complicated, and runs at a rate of anywhere from 3-5 beats per second, as in the German video of the balance and escapment of a Unitsa 6497 (which is a common modern pocket watch movement.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hv7lcmZ8OR4


Cheers
Harold




Oh my! Be still my beating heart!!! Shocked
Logged

"If you'll release restrain me, whatever you ask for ransom, you'll get it I promise you." What Princess Buttercup (The Princess Bride) SHOULD have said...
Dr von Zarkov
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


<Maddest Scientist>


« Reply #17 on: January 22, 2009, 04:02:39 am »

The current issue of WIRED magazine has an article on the Corpus Clock, which may be viewed here: Corpus Clock
Logged

"The fact that I wear the protective coloration of sedate citizenship is a ruse of the fox — I learned it long ago."
– Loren Eiseley
MadmanMachine
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #18 on: January 30, 2009, 08:40:21 am »

This Corpus Clock looks like it should be the instrument of the apocalypse or something.

When the clock dies down, so does the world.
Logged
Miss Kins
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Several palm trees short of a fruit cake.


« Reply #19 on: February 11, 2009, 01:31:21 pm »

The current issue of WIRED magazine has an article on the Corpus Clock, which may be viewed here: Corpus Clock


...Words fail me.  What a beautiful feat of craftmanship.  Personally I love the method they've used to show the time, the LED's look lovely in that gold face.

I want one.  Grin
Logged

''Sure, it's all fun and games until the tentacled lizard-spider that was your crotch tells you that everything is made of Tuesday because only the sky can cook happiness.''
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.149 seconds with 18 queries.