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Author Topic: Poltics , Religion and Sex  (Read 15482 times)
Albrecht
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« Reply #25 on: January 14, 2009, 12:57:11 pm »

Ethics classes have the most interesting exams.

I remember my own final exam from when I took an ethics class. This was the last question on the exam:

"For each ethical system we have studied this semester answer, and justify your answer to the following question: Assuming vampires are real, and must consume human blood to survive, should people be required to give blood to them?"

The craziest part, was that I had completely forgotten how one of the systems (the Ethics of Love, or something like that) worked, and for it I simply wrote: "Vampires? Gotta love 'em. And you never starve the ones you love."

I don't remember how well I did over all on the exam, but I did pass, and I will never forget that I got full credit for that particular answer.   Cheesy

There was an "open letter" printed in a German goth magazine years back. It was really fun to read and concerned various problems vampires face in the modern world. Everythng from lack of virgins to potential victims carrying mace and the dangers of jet-lag. It concluded something like that: "In case you meet a vampire, for Heaven's sake be nice, he's got it bad these days."
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Mlle A. Aurantia
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« Reply #26 on: January 15, 2009, 06:35:33 am »

I got full credit in my French History class when I was asked to tell who did something and I couldn't remember his name but described him as "that guy who designed the first gothic cathedral. . . what's-his-name???

But then my prof was more interested in our understanding of the culture of the period than our memorizations of dates.

I got kicked out of the philosophy department in my first year after I used geometrical singularites to prove that square triangles could, indeed, exist, as well as square circles. My mother had to Email an apology to the prof, and explain that she had been putting up with my arguments for 22 years. I coudl out-logic her at age 2, though.

I also had the bad luck of studying Descartes in all 4 of my classes (French, Philosophy of Religion, Enlightenment Thought, and Algebra.) at the same time while hopped up on cold medication. I've never quite recovered from that. . .  Undecided
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Magister
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« Reply #27 on: January 15, 2009, 07:13:12 am »

There was an "open letter" printed in a German goth magazine years back. It was really fun to read and concerned various problems vampires face in the modern world. Everythng from lack of virgins to potential victims carrying mace and the dangers of jet-lag. It concluded something like that: "In case you meet a vampire, for Heaven's sake be nice, he's got it bad these days."

Truly if one thinks about it the vampires do have it bad these days. But they really need to stop complaining about being restricted to nocturnal life, in this age of 24 hour Walmart stores, and night shift jobs.  Grin
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spcglider
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« Reply #28 on: January 15, 2009, 07:15:15 pm »

Ethics classes have the most interesting exams.

I remember my own final exam from when I took an ethics class. This was the last question on the exam:

"For each ethical system we have studied this semester answer, and justify your answer to the following question: Assuming vampires are real, and must consume human blood to survive, should people be required to give blood to them?"

The craziest part, was that I had completely forgotten how one of the systems (the Ethics of Love, or something like that) worked, and for it I simply wrote: "Vampires? Gotta love 'em. And you never starve the ones you love."

I don't remember how well I did over all on the exam, but I did pass, and I will never forget that I got full credit for that particular answer.   Cheesy

My answer would have been, simply, "Who's vampires? As soon as you answer that, I can answer the question."

Are we talking Anne Rice vampires? Bela Lugosi vampires? Underworld vampires? Blade vampires? Buffy vampires? Dark Shadows vampires? Lost Boys vampires? Fright Night vampires? I mean the list goes on and on and on and every single scenario bears different elements of consequence.  Are we talking mystical vampirism? Chemically caused vampirism? Biologically based vampirism?

And if leeches could talk, would we be obligated to supply them with human blood to live on?

Poor question, methinks.

-Gordon


« Last Edit: January 15, 2009, 07:17:15 pm by spcglider » Logged

Professor Gordon Elias Weatherbee, Tinker and Time Travel Machine Repair. All models serviced.
Magister
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« Reply #29 on: January 16, 2009, 12:31:42 am »


My answer would have been, simply, "Who's vampires? As soon as you answer that, I can answer the question."

Are we talking Anne Rice vampires? Bela Lugosi vampires? Underworld vampires? Blade vampires? Buffy vampires? Dark Shadows vampires? Lost Boys vampires? Fright Night vampires? I mean the list goes on and on and on and every single scenario bears different elements of consequence.  Are we talking mystical vampirism? Chemically caused vampirism? Biologically based vampirism?

And if leeches could talk, would we be obligated to supply them with human blood to live on?

Poor question, methinks.

-Gordon




I don't think the professor was familiar with the vagaries of vampirism. I still commend her for thinking outside the box, and crafting a truly original, entertaining, and thought provoking test question.
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Horse Brass
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« Reply #30 on: January 16, 2009, 01:24:55 am »

I'm glad all my exams were long ago...

First year physics, dynamics, the end of topic exam was 50 multiple choice questions. One of my friends had already decided to drop the class, having failed a previous exam, so he walked in proudly holding his role-playing dice, rolled for every question, and walked out after half an hour. I worked until the end of the exam.

I got 64%.

His dice got 72%.
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"Not without my hat." - Scott Anger, The Dame was Loaded
The_Steam_Master
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« Reply #31 on: January 16, 2009, 02:27:55 am »

I'm glad all my exams were long ago...

First year physics, dynamics, the end of topic exam was 50 multiple choice questions. One of my friends had already decided to drop the class, having failed a previous exam, so he walked in proudly holding his role-playing dice, rolled for every question, and walked out after half an hour. I worked until the end of the exam.

I got 64%.

His dice got 72%.


your friends dice +1 Grin
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Katrina Broekhart
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« Reply #32 on: January 16, 2009, 07:26:43 pm »

Name- Kat Molotov
Date- None currently.

1. Explain why you think you deserve an A in this class.

I think I deserve a B.



I got an A.
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Kaljaia
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« Reply #33 on: January 18, 2009, 09:30:12 am »

Got a real one for ya- my professor swears this one is true, as it happened to a fellow professor he knows well:

The professor was teaching on Daoism, and at the end of the quarter gave an essay exam on the concept. One student who had caught his eye as a consistent A in the class turned in his paper blank, no essay, nothing at all.

The professor called him in after class and asked what the problem was, as the kid had one very well up until then. The student replied "You of all people should have known...."

Then the professor understood. Foundation proverb of Daoism: "Those who speak do not know, and those who know do not speak."

The student got an A on the test but was admonished to never pull that stunt again.
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rovingjack
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« Reply #34 on: January 19, 2009, 01:09:35 am »

this reminds me of a few other educational quirks in life.

There was the elementary school math professor who caught me day dreaming and asked me rather loudly to compliment the angle on the board. I got up and with a completely serious expression I said "Wow, you are acute angle." Then returned to my seat. Even the teacher laughed at that because not only was it a fun pun, but it was true too.

Then there was a social studies teacher who included some intresting extra credit questions on the final. Like who is burried in grants tomb? What was the name of the lone rangers horse? and such questions. You'd be amazed by how many people get them wrong. The most common answer to the second question was Tonto... are you flipping kidding me?

And I'm annoyed by the question what grade do you think you deserve on this test. I was nervous and underconfident on how I did on my economics class final and wrote B. I was a teen with low self asteem to. So when the papers came back I was the only student in the whole class that didn't get an A despite having gotten something like 95% of the answers right and there where other who asked for an A and got it despite being way off on most of the answers.
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Sean Patrick O-Byrne
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« Reply #35 on: January 19, 2009, 04:09:01 am »

That should be a rhetorical question, and have nothing to do with the actual marks.
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living_soul12066
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« Reply #36 on: January 19, 2009, 06:13:03 am »

That should be a rhetorical question, and have nothing to do with the actual marks.
I second this notion! Sadly, I have no stories to tell, though you people have made me laugh  Grin
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Sean Patrick O-Byrne
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« Reply #37 on: January 19, 2009, 10:07:49 am »

That should be a rhetorical question, and have nothing to do with the actual marks.
I second this notion! Sadly, I have no stories to tell, though you people have made me laugh  Grin
You and me both.
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Katrina Broekhart
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« Reply #38 on: January 19, 2009, 03:49:38 pm »

That should be a rhetorical question, and have nothing to do with the actual marks.
I second this notion! Sadly, I have no stories to tell, though you people have made me laugh  Grin
You and me both.

In this case, it was either an A or you failed the class.
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Captain Lyerly
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« Reply #39 on: January 19, 2009, 05:05:32 pm »

Mlle. Aurantia:

As long as you could defend DesCartes before you were hoarse, no problem.


Cheers!

Chas.
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quantumcat
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« Reply #40 on: January 22, 2009, 09:02:10 am »

Oh,I loved that!!!

I remember being very nervous right before my Philosophy final my freshman year in college.

I panicked when the professor spotted me getting a snack in the student union building instead of cramming.

As I was heading back to the dorm,he asked "Why are you running off? You know everything on the test already."

He urged all his students there to relax,hang out,eat some real food and get a good night's rest.

(Which we could,thanks to him.)

The next day,instead of freezing up over the exam,I recalled the discussions,debates and jokes we'd had.

(I got an "A".  )

Later,I took a graduate level Philosophy course in one of those sterile,amphitheatre-type courses.

I'd not have known one answer on any of the tests given if I hadn't had that freshman course.

I came to find out that those in the know checked out the video-taped version of the graduate course and had someone punch in their student i.d. numbers on class days.

They or their surrogates would fill out the tests based on the material on the tapes.

For me,going to weekly sessions of that soulless,metastasized seminar was a waste of time and tuition.

I blew that course at Vandy but aced the conventionally-styled courses at Peabody and the independent studies even though they were supposed to be higher level courses.

I guess it's all about what you put into it and what matches your learning style.

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Mlle A. Aurantia
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« Reply #41 on: January 22, 2009, 09:18:06 am »

Descartes in a nutshell: If you run a fever into delerium and stare at the bugs on the ceiling, YOU TOO could be a mathematical and philosophical genius!!!!!
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Sean Patrick O-Byrne
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« Reply #42 on: January 22, 2009, 09:08:46 pm »

If I'd known that, I would have done much better in highschool math...  Wink
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DrTom
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« Reply #43 on: January 22, 2009, 09:18:03 pm »

That should be a rhetorical question, and have nothing to do with the actual marks.
I second this notion! Sadly, I have no stories to tell, though you people have made me laugh  Grin
You and me both.


Something I do when I teach social psychology to open up a discussion on prosocial behavior:

I offer students the opportunity to earn either 2 or 5 extra credit points on their final grade, which can be quite impactful.

All you have to do is write down how many points you want, don't speak to anyone during the voting process.  Those who ask for 3, get 3 points.  Those who ask for 5, get 5 points.

Here's the catch:  "If 15% or more of you ask for 5 points, all bets are off and no points are awarded."

In my 9 years of doing this, I've had to give extra credit points twice...both times due to my error in giving the instructions poorly.

After all votes are tallied and the bad (or, in those rare occasions, good) news is given, we discuss prosocial behavior, competition versus cooperation, "the prisoner's dilemma," and all that good stuff.

Boy...I've kinda gone off topic with this.... Embarrassed
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rogue_designer
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« Reply #44 on: January 22, 2009, 09:39:49 pm »

This is a bit long, so I will spoiler.

An interesting anecdote on the nature of free thought in education.
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

I enjoyed. And hope others will as well.
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(Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes. But deserve a nice glass of absinthe. I have some Montemarte in the cabinet, if you wish.)
Sean Patrick O-Byrne
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« Reply #45 on: January 23, 2009, 01:32:50 am »

That's an excellent story!
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Magister
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« Reply #46 on: January 23, 2009, 01:40:25 am »

I think it's rather sad that many people view educational institutions in such a disturbingly mechanical sense. Rather than asking "is the student knowledgeable and does he/she possess sufficient problem solving skills?" they too often seem to ask "has student # xyz demonstrated retention of data sets a, b, and c?"

I remember a bitter debate my Registrar's office once, when I was denied credit for a course because they claimed I had taken it twice. As it turns out, the class about classic literature of east Asia now had the same course number as a class about literature concerning childhood and growth that I had taken two years previously, and taught by a different professor. In the end I did win my claim that the content was sufficiently different that it should count as a separate class, but it was rather galling.

Too often, the education of people seems to be regarded as a factory process churning out interchangeable cogs meeting the parameters of the machine of the world.
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Zwack
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And introducing the wonderful Irish (Mrs Z).


« Reply #47 on: January 23, 2009, 01:59:22 am »


Something I do when I teach social psychology to open up a discussion on prosocial behavior:

I offer students the opportunity to earn either 2 or 5 extra credit points on their final grade, which can be quite impactful.

All you have to do is write down how many points you want, don't speak to anyone during the voting process.  Those who ask for 3, get 3 points.  Those who ask for 5, get 5 points.

Here's the catch:  "If 15% or more of you ask for 5 points, all bets are off and no points are awarded."

In my 9 years of doing this, I've had to give extra credit points twice...both times due to my error in giving the instructions poorly.

After all votes are tallied and the bad (or, in those rare occasions, good) news is given, we discuss prosocial behavior, competition versus cooperation, "the prisoner's dilemma," and all that good stuff.

Boy...I've kinda gone off topic with this.... Embarrassed

Before the voting process someone should shout out "everyone choose 4 points"  Smiley  or if they know you're going to say that in advance then they can collude to choose 4 points.  Maximum number of points all round.

Z.
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rovingjack
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« Reply #48 on: January 23, 2009, 04:21:14 am »

This is a bit long, so I will spoiler.

An interesting anecdote on the nature of free thought in education.
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

I enjoyed. And hope others will as well.

Yes I rather like that person. Most of the teachers I had would consider that to be smart@$$ talk and not only not valid answers but also worth of punishment.

Feh, seriously it leads to so downright foolish people like my first housemate. The man was a mathmatics teacher and a history teacher, but completely lacked common sense, and all his learning was reciting texts on those given topics. I'm not sure he even really understood them.

Unfortunately it's a product of our worlds progress that individuals with the ability to think like all those that this topic was started to discuss are acceptable if slightly annoying to the system which is really just looking for the replacable cogs that transfer what is given them to the next part of the system.
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Luella Dobson
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« Reply #49 on: January 23, 2009, 05:02:32 am »

I think it's rather sad that many people view educational institutions in such a disturbingly mechanical sense. Rather than asking "is the student knowledgeable and does he/she possess sufficient problem solving skills?" they too often seem to ask "has student # xyz demonstrated retention of data sets a, b, and c?"

I remember a bitter debate my Registrar's office once, when I was denied credit for a course because they claimed I had taken it twice. As it turns out, the class about classic literature of east Asia now had the same course number as a class about literature concerning childhood and growth that I had taken two years previously, and taught by a different professor. In the end I did win my claim that the content was sufficiently different that it should count as a separate class, but it was rather galling.

Too often, the education of people seems to be regarded as a factory process churning out interchangeable cogs meeting the parameters of the machine of the world.

tell me about it. I don't feel like I'm in college, it feels like a machine. and my college is run like a business too. I can't even minor in anything, it's so streamlined. which is sad, because I'd minor in fashion design to learn how to sew.
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General for the Study and Ultimate Disregard for the Laws of Universe through Strange and Ultimately Unfathomable Means
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