The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
October 23, 2017, 11:47:17 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Support BrassGoggles! Donate once or $3/mo.
 See details here.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: How to preserve a fox's brush?  (Read 5884 times)
Prof. Brockworth
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Choppy Warburton rides again!


« on: January 09, 2009, 10:47:40 pm »

I've just acquired a deceased dog fox, whose head is heading for the flensing tank and a project.  This fellow has a splendid tail on him too -- what's the best way to preserve it?
Logged

Recovering from pennyfarthing bruises...
Siliconous Skumins
Server Monk
Governor
Rogue Ætherlord
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2009, 11:18:45 pm »

Well, You need to remove the tail bone, split the tail skin open and apply salt to dry it (will end up hard / brittle). Or you could just rip the tail bone out, then pack the 'tube' with salt and dry it that way..
If you want for a soft / supple tail your going to have to tan it. Dunno about that. (taxidermist?)  Undecided

SS
Logged

[Server Prayer]
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
Myriad
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2009, 11:41:07 pm »

The easiest method for tanning is what the American Indians did, its called Brain tanning. The old adage was "every animal has the brains to tan its own hide." 

The basics of the method are as follows:
Split the tail. Scrape all the fat from the inside surface.Simply pulp some real brain and rub it into the inner surface of the hide where you scraped. Sound nasty but works wonders.

Here is a complete tutorial.
http://www.braintan.com/articles/furs/george1.html
Logged
Prof. Brockworth
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Choppy Warburton rides again!


« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2009, 12:21:34 am »

hack hack hack
slice crunch twist
splort ew thud


Right, the head is being fed to my invertebrate minions, the tail is in the fridge in about six nested baggies.  Unfortunately, I need the skull intact so I can't get to the brain -- so, any advance on brain tanning?  Is this something where you need tannin?  Drat my lack of basic survival skills!
Logged
Myriad
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2009, 12:37:52 am »

All you need is brains (that sounds wrong on so many levels, sorry). A trip to your local butcher might be the easiest answer. No tannins or anything else is required. Make the brain into a paste rub into scraped hide and keep warm so it soaks in, easy.
Logged
Doc Rivets
Officer
***
Australia Australia


Relative Density Tester


« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2009, 12:49:27 am »

This fellow has a splendid tail on him too -- what's the best way to preserve it?

I was going to be a complete barstand, and say something facetious like "don't kill the fox in the first place"...but I'm so glad I didn't.  Grin

Actually I was curious... what were you going to do with the tail? Hang it from the aerial on the car? People used to do that once.

Doc
Logged

"The law of gravity, may need to be repealed."
JingleJoe
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
United Kingdom United Kingdom


The Green Dungeon Alchemist


WWW
« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2009, 01:15:06 am »

All you need is brains (that sounds wrong on so many levels, sorry). A trip to your local butcher might be the easiest answer. No tannins or anything else is required. Make the brain into a paste rub into scraped hide and keep warm so it soaks in, easy.
I thought the idea was to mush the brains up in warm water or a warm pan? Not cook them but get them warm to the touch, then rub in, anyway I suppose that's just another way of keeping them warm Smiley
Logged

Green Dungeon Alchemist Laboratories
Providing weird sound contraptions and time machines since 2064.
Prof. Brockworth
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Choppy Warburton rides again!


« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2009, 10:04:14 pm »

I was going to be a complete barstand, and say something facetious like "don't kill the fox in the first place"...but I'm so glad I didn't.  Grin

Actually I was curious... what were you going to do with the tail? Hang it from the aerial on the car? People used to do that once.

Roadkill is unending in its dubious bounty.

At least nobody dared me to eat it Wink

Dunno what I'll do... it's just too good to leave to the crows, y'know?

I wonder if the local butcher does branes?
Logged
Ben Franklin's Electric Kite
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Rex Libris


« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2009, 09:52:36 am »

Yep. Split it, scrape all the fat and nasty off but don't scrape so far you expose the hair roots. Rub warm puree of brains on, repeatedly, that is essentially soaks overnight. This process should make it feel hideously slimey, much much more nasty than it felt after being scraped clean. It will create a dreadful pong. Rinse it, and then whack it against a rock and twist it and stretch it and mess around with it as it dries. It is fragile in this state and you're likely to rip it and even experience won't help you much 'cause a young animal's skin is more fragile than an older one's and it's hard to tell until you've accidentally destroyed it. It'll go all hard again every time it gets wet, requiring you to do this again, unless you smoke it as well.

I have heard tell that egg-yolk will work as a substitute for brains. It is a myth that every critter has enough brains to tan its own hide.

There are easier, more pleasant methods that don't require the scraping (the fat will turn into the most disgusting sheet of soap the world as ever known, and pull off the skin in an amazing, grotesque sheet) but they will take the hair off, too.
Logged
Prof. Brockworth
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Choppy Warburton rides again!


« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2009, 11:23:12 pm »

Egg yolk sounds workable.  I need those eggwhites for my lean mean fightin' cuisine.  Smiley

So how long do you let it stand once it's been scraped and brained?  Overnight?  Weeks? 
Logged
Doc Rivets
Officer
***
Australia Australia


Relative Density Tester


« Reply #10 on: January 12, 2009, 07:57:52 am »



Roadkill is unending in its dubious bounty.

At least nobody dared me to eat it Wink



Ah yes... death by Ranger Rover. In Louisiana where my wife is from, the Cajuns have a "roadkill cookbook". Basically they'll eat anything, live or dead, that doesn't eat them first. Fresh alligator is a problem...

1) Protected.
2) Mean, bad tempered, no sense of humour animals

Doc
Logged
Prof. Brockworth
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Choppy Warburton rides again!


« Reply #11 on: January 12, 2009, 11:24:33 pm »

I'll eat any herbivore (I get shouted at by friends for pausing on bike rides to check out bunnies) but so far, have shied away from carnivores.  Gator, which is a helicoptered-over-in-little-baggies delicacy in the UK, isn't bad.  I hear 'dillo is tasty too Smiley
Logged
Wayland2002
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #12 on: January 14, 2009, 09:46:20 am »

Contact Dave at www.houseofdeclifford.co.uk he'll be able to give you some advice (or prehaps sell you a ready preserved tail), his phone number is in the bottom left corner of the page.
Logged
Ben Franklin's Electric Kite
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Rex Libris


« Reply #13 on: January 15, 2009, 10:06:15 pm »

Egg yolk sounds workable.  I need those eggwhites for my lean mean fightin' cuisine.  Smiley

So how long do you let it stand once it's been scraped and brained?  Overnight?  Weeks? 

With brains, overnight or for about four hours. It'll raise an unholy stink. Some people let it alone to dry and then rub more brains on, let that soak a bit and then do the stretching and rock-walloping business. Thing is, if it doesn't work you'll notice this hard rawhide patch in the skin after it's dry, and you just rub more brains on and have another go. Beats me about egg yolk, but if it does substitute for brains in the same process, you should be set.
Logged
Kaljaia
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States



« Reply #14 on: January 18, 2009, 12:08:51 am »

I have used a preservative tan in the past- worked lovely for a beaver and coyote- left them stiff but flexible and kept the bugs out and hair on. Unfortunately I am one full state away from the magic bottle; however a taxidermist should know the name of it. It was a one-application chemical, required no mixing or solvents, and was a dark brown color with a mild smell.

If the tail skin is greasy, soak the thing in gasoline to remove it or rub with borax and scrape. I keep borax rubbed into the fur of my pelts to discourage moths and mites as well.
Logged

Every good "Why" deserves a "Why Not?"
Gracie Fullman
Deck Hand
*
United States United States

A delicate flower with far too many thorns


« Reply #15 on: January 20, 2009, 03:22:28 am »

Borax is a pretty good bug repellent. I haven't done any tanning, but in my experiance borax sounds like it would help with preserving it.

Can you post a picture of the tail?
Logged
stockton_joans
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #16 on: January 20, 2009, 01:53:28 pm »

http://freespace.virgin.net/sts.northwales/cat.htm

is a rarther good taxidermy site by the look of it, it sells all the stuff you need in various quantaties as well as mounting supplys (cases, bases and habitat pieces)

i havent got round to ordering from them yet but as soon as i have a reason to i will be
Logged

Stockton Joans:
Gentleman
Tinkerer
Part time Illithid hunter
SalieriAAX
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #17 on: January 20, 2009, 02:36:29 pm »

Bring it to a long, rolling boil in a big pan with heaps of sugar and pectin, cool in a Kilner jar and serve on toast or scones.
Logged

None so knowing as he
At brewing a jorum of tea
Haha Haha
A pretty stiff jorum of tea
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.276 seconds with 18 queries.