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Author Topic: Paint effects for that clasic rust or old copper look  (Read 31032 times)
maduncle
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« on: December 30, 2008, 01:13:31 am »

Greetings all,

Thought I might provide a link to this supplier of very intersting paint in Melbourne.

http://www.porterspaints.com.au

I have used thier liquid metal and instant rust product on timber and it is superb - it actually rusts!

I have yet to try thier liquid copper and patina product, but no doubt I will soon.

Only hang up is the cost - over $150 for the 'small' container - so it needs to be a worthwhile project.

Still - for those who need to rust non metal objects and don't want to try a painted lookalike effect, I can recommend Porter's Paints products.

Cheers
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Lord.Escher
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« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2009, 05:05:58 pm »

I think you could achieve a similar effect using iron dust diluted in mineral spirits.
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copper shard
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« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2009, 03:00:30 am »

there is a special chemical for aging copper, brass, and silver, but i can't remember what it's called... it's a bit like hydrochloric acid...
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Hektor Plasm
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« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2009, 06:56:11 pm »

there is a special chemical for aging copper, brass, and silver, but i can't remember what it's called... it's a bit like hydrochloric acid...

Saturday morning wee?   Tongue

HP
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arcane
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« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2009, 07:07:04 pm »

http://houseofantiquehardware.com/s.nl/sc.13/category.145/.f?gclid=CP6d74PrypMCFQVxFQodD3colQ
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Professor Damien Tremens
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« Reply #5 on: January 06, 2009, 01:42:43 am »

there is a special chemical for aging copper, brass, and silver, but i can't remember what it's called... it's a bit like hydrochloric acid...


Liver of sulfur, I believe. Technical name is sulfated potash. but most jewelry supply places
will have it listed under the liver of sulfur name/brand.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potassium_sulfide
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Captain Mitarwan
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« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2009, 10:14:03 am »

There is also the two-part paint I've seen used in the model railroad hobby. You coat any surface with part A, and part B will cause it to rust. Very convincing.

http://www.rustall.com/
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Tommy Thumbscrew
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« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2009, 08:55:03 pm »

The Rustall system is all paint, in truth.  A pair of pre-diluted water-base washes, some sifted earth and a water-based dead-flat clear coat.  Experimenting with the order these product are applied can give some very convincing effects, and if you aren't pleased, a little ammonia-based cleaner (Windex, etc.) will remove it quite handily.

This one was done using lacquer bases with the rustall system over the top, though I was going more for an oxidized aluminum look, so I used very little of the "Rust" wash, and more of the "black" wash.


The rust on this one was applied before the "paint" coat - the rusty areas were masked with rubber cement and moistened table salt, then the ivory was sprayed over the top.  When it was dry, the "masked" areas were rubbed, exposing the "rust" underneath.


A similar method was used on the "bucket" section in the middle of this model - the car is only about 3-1/2" long.


There are a few things goin on in the following pic:

This is a 1/8 scale hotrod model I built a few years ago. The "rock chips" on the front suspension and the top of the radiator shell were done pretty much as I described previously - an oxidized patina was applied, and moistened salt was used to mask the "chips" before applying paint.  The skull and lug-wrench in the center of the radiator opening were painted flat black, and dry-brushed with different metallics before I gave them a light coating of the "Rust" wash.  The headlight buckets are really easy - to get a more uniform oxidized appearance, I grabbed two cans of hobby spray paint - Tamiya Light Gunmetal and Floquil Roof Brown - and alternated misting coats of each on the buckets until i got the look I was after.  This is a very simple and expedient way to get a realistically distressed appearance on "steel" pieces.  On areas that receive more wear, a brighter silver can be lightly drybrushed on the edges.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2009, 09:06:53 pm by Tommy Thumbscrew » Logged
bigsam
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« Reply #8 on: January 23, 2009, 02:26:18 pm »

I have yet to try it but my builder uncle informs me that if you put a blowtorch (or any other hot flame) to brass it makes it look aged. i'm not sure if it works with copper but im going to a scrapmetal yard in an hour so i may let you know Smiley
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Prof. Albrecht Von Taggërt
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« Reply #9 on: January 23, 2009, 04:24:32 pm »

Tommy,

I have to chime in and say your car models are awesome, any larger pics of the 1/8 hotrod? thanks for th tips!
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akumabito
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« Reply #10 on: January 23, 2009, 07:47:27 pm »

Any cheap & effective rust effect painting techniques for larger objects? Say you'd want to do an entire car, without the thing actually rusting..
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Tommy Thumbscrew
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« Reply #11 on: January 24, 2009, 02:21:25 am »

Tommy,

I have to chime in and say your car models are awesome, any larger pics of the 1/8 hotrod? thanks for th tips!


Here are some more shots - I don'y know if you can make out the coolant-soaked rag around the upper radiator hose, or the fact that I finished the six carburetors in three distinct levels of patina, but you should be able to get the gist of it.




As far as rust treatments for larger surfaces, there is a two-part system available at craft stores, and I'm sure there's some distributor that sells it in larger quantities.  The first coat is a paint that contains iron oxide - this should be sprayed over a sealed barrier primer.  The second coat has an activating agent that rusts the iron oxide powder in the first layer overnight.  You can leave it exposed, however to extend the lifetime of this special effect paint, it's probably best to overcoat it with a dead-flat clear.

There was a fiberglass-bodied hotrod on the circuit a few years ago that had some very convincing worn paint and rust effects applied - making many scratch their heads because it was a fairly popular phantom rod body, but had all the indications that it was vintage steel.

For more articles and info regarding these wear and patina techniques, try searching for "fauxtina".
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bigsuv
Swab

United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #12 on: May 15, 2009, 02:00:12 pm »

Tommy,

I have made a 1/4 scale model in GRP of a vehicle and am trying to make the rocker panels look like they're aged copper/bronze...

You mentioned in your previous post about the two stage paint, first layer containing iron oxide, second layer rusting it etc.

Do you know what it is called and where I might be able to find it? (I'm in the UK)

By the way, agree with the prof. the hot rod looks awesome!

Cheers

Adam
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sidecar_jon
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« Reply #13 on: May 18, 2009, 01:13:25 pm »

Re-turning copper green/aged i have discovered that cheap liquid plant food (i got mine from that font of cheap tools and food Lidels) painted on, pretty much instantly turns it green....
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Brutal Rust
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« Reply #14 on: June 09, 2011, 03:28:44 pm »

We have a new product called Brutal Rust. I think that our paint would be very helpful to a lot of the steampunk / model artists.
It's a paint that will rust in one hour. The paint is currently available and you can read more about it on our website.  http://brutalrust.com/

Please let me know if you have any questions.
Thanks Kirk.
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Joeynana
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Australia Australia


« Reply #15 on: June 10, 2011, 11:30:51 am »

Being an Aussie, I've looked over this site many times dreaming of the day I could afford their paint.  A cheaper option is Haymes Paints.  They have a small selection of iron and copper paint (and the aging solution) it's about $70.00 for 500ml or $140.00 a litre. Here are some pics of their product I've used in my bathroom.






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maduncle
Zeppelin Captain
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Australia Australia


Indubitably...

@maduncle
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« Reply #16 on: June 12, 2011, 11:21:56 am »

Being an Aussie, I've looked over this site many times dreaming of the day I could afford their paint.  A cheaper option is Haymes Paints.  They have a small selection of iron and copper paint (and the aging solution) it's about $70.00 for 500ml or $140.00 a litre. Here are some pics of their product I've used in my bathroom.









Nice work there!

I have just used the Porter's Paints product on our shop front door, I added original patina rusted parts to the door once the paint was dry to add some character.


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Joeynana
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« Reply #17 on: June 12, 2011, 03:00:36 pm »

It does appear as though Porters product is superior...  Or the painter's teqnique.  Love the valve handle by the way.
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Lucius Baxter
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« Reply #18 on: June 23, 2011, 11:46:20 am »

well, I suppose one could get some reddy rusty paint and dry brush it on....
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Herbert West
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« Reply #19 on: June 24, 2011, 09:34:22 pm »

 It takes a few treatments, but I've found that a mixture of salt dissolved in plain vinegar ages brass quite nicely. And of course, dissolving steel wool in vinegar makes an effective liquid rust (its good for aging pape rand wood as well). Though its a bit hard to control the placement.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2011, 02:59:14 pm by Herbert West » Logged

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